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Who Makes The Generator on the Dream/Triumph


NBCNewsGuy

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when the splendor replaced it had to go to drydock and they cut a hole in side to replace

 

They now say they will be a port canaveral midweek, replace the emertgency genset and sail on Saturday

 

How big is the genset and how can they replace at a dock ?:confused:

 

The emergency generator (and I think from the Carnival Q&A that is posted here at CC that it is the generator not the engine) is about one third the size of a main generator. The emergency generator is also usually located up high, around the sports deck level, by the funnel. The generator weighs a few tons, and can be lifted in with a crane. There may be what we call a "soft patch" or bolted cover over the emergency generator to facilitate removal. Otherwise, you would need to cut out the overhead or bulkhead and then weld it back in after repairs.

 

The main engines are down below the waterline, and cutting out the side is pretty typical for an engine or generator replacement.

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This has nothing to do with who builds what, but who is in charge and whether they take the time to take care of equipment that is required for operation and safety. Like the Concordian disaster the human element is the most critical, and here leadership and focus on profit above other elements is the most likely root cause.

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Carnival has more ships and carries more passengers, logic would lead one to conclude that they would have a higher rate of casualties than the other cruise lines.

You have one of the funniest AE on CC

 

. I have seen MAN main engines on ships with Caterpillar emergency engines."

?

 

No wonder our stock is going down:rolleyes:

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interesting note to add on why the power outage lasted about 20 minutes.

An emergency transfer switch has a built in delay before switching back to mains to prevent a situation where the switch bounces repeatedly which is very damaging to anything connected to that line.

 

The ETS on a backup generator I had installed and maintained took about 15 minutes after a test or failure to accept that the mains power was safe for transfer.

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interesting note to add on why the power outage lasted about 20 minutes.

An emergency transfer switch has a built in delay before switching back to mains to prevent a situation where the switch bounces repeatedly which is very damaging to anything connected to that line.

 

The ETS on a backup generator I had installed and maintained took about 15 minutes after a test or failure to accept that the mains power was safe for transfer.

Wow........ Halcyon the first blue pill:cool:

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interesting note to add on why the power outage lasted about 20 minutes.

An emergency transfer switch has a built in delay before switching back to mains to prevent a situation where the switch bounces repeatedly which is very damaging to anything connected to that line.

 

The ETS on a backup generator I had installed and maintained took about 15 minutes after a test or failure to accept that the mains power was safe for transfer.

 

A shipboard emergency generator is required to start, run up to speed, and close the circuit breaker within 60 seconds of sensing loss of power on the emergency power bus. Transition back to main power requires only a few seconds, just long enough for the breakers to cycle. From Carnival's Q&A posted on CC, it appears to me as if the generator itself has shorted, and will be replaced. That is assumming that what is actually required has not been lost in the translation to a press release. It may be just a circuit breaker, or the generator itself. Since there is mention of a crane, I'm assumming the generator.

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I was on the Dream and while we were still docked the "routine testing" found the problem.That is what we were told over the PA by the Captain. My family was glad that they didn't try to set sail with just the primary.

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A shipboard emergency generator is required to start, run up to speed, and close the circuit breaker within 60 seconds of sensing loss of power on the emergency power bus. Transition back to main power requires only a few seconds, just long enough for the breakers to cycle. From Carnival's Q&A posted on CC, it appears to me as if the generator itself has shorted, and will be replaced. That is assumming that what is actually required has not been lost in the translation to a press release. It may be just a circuit breaker, or the generator itself. Since there is mention of a crane, I'm assumming the generator.

 

True, my experience is with an 100KW Cummings generator, our ETS wouldn't switch back to mains for several minutes by design unless I cracked it open and threw the switch by hand.

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