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Down Under Souveniers


MVPinBoynton

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We will be heading for New Zealand in 3.5 weeks. Are their any "must get" souveniers from down under. It is always fun to bring back unique things from our travels and we are hoping that there will be some unique things in NZ and Oz.

Hi Mike

 

Theres a great selection of arts and crafts, with some amazing local artists using a variety of materials. maori carving in wood, bone and green stone are always popular and can be found in many locations. NZ wine is another good one though you may have to square that with the ship to allow it on board. Most good gift and art shops can also organise postage back to the US so you do not have to carry it with you. Regards Ian

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It is always fun to bring back unique things from our travels and we are hoping that there will be some unique things in NZ and Oz.

 

Here are a couple to think about..........

 

Buzzy Bee is a NZ Icon............

29-BUZ-78162.jpg

 

Generations of little New Zealanders have pulled Buzzy Bee around since the mid 1940's. Buzzy Bee is a real nursery adventure in colour, sound and movement and has become a favourite icon of New Zealand. When pulled the wings spin and antenae wobble, while making a clanking sound as it moves along. Buzzy Bee is made from wood and measures approx. 150mm long.

 

fishhook.jpg

 

The Maori Fish Hook will bring you strength, prosperity, abundance, fertility and great respect for the sea.

It is also said to provide good luck and safety when travelling over water.Also represents power and authority.Available everywhere in NZ and comes in many varieties from cattle bone to greenstone (jade)

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Ian,

We couldn't resist the beautiful wood carvings in the Marquesas last year. They will be quite tempting.

 

Kiwi Kruzer,

Thank you so much for posting the pictures. Since we have a new granddaughter, a buzzy bee will definitely be coming back home with us. I am glad to know about the fish hook. That could be a great souvenir to bring back for a lot of folks and it wouldn't take up much space.

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Is vegemite any good? I don't recall hearing anything positive about it.

 

I'm personally not a big fan of Vegemite, but it is something you must try. Why go to another country and not try a specialty there? And it also depends on who you spoke to about it..hehe

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Globaliser,

Is vegemite any good? I don't recall hearing anything positive about it.

 

It's a great cure for seasickness. Feel at little nauseous? Take a spoonful of the ol' Vegemite...you'll then know what sick really is...;)

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When we cruised around Australia two years ago, my niece, who teaches 4th grade had her class work on a unit on Australia. From every port, I sent them emails about the history, geography, flora and fauna of the region. I bought them books, CD's and posters and for good measure I put in some Australian candies (caramel koalas) and a jar of Vegemite. Two years later, they are still talking abou the Vegemite! They are now cool, sophisticated 6th graders but when they see my niece, they always remind her about the "nasty black stuff" that her Auntie sent.

 

Everyone in the class sent me thank you letters and they suggested that for my next trip, I come to Cleveland so they can meet me! I thought that was adorable. This is an inner city school and most of them have never been out of Cleveland.

 

Tonight is the first leg of our journey to board the Statendam in Auckland and I will again be providing information for this year's 4th grade class.

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Lots of people who try Vegemite for the first time put too much on their toast or sandwich. That's why they don't like it. Just use a little Vegemite, its not spread like peanut butter! You should be able to see the butter underneath the Vegemite. A little goes a long way. Its also a great source of vitamin B.

 

I also use Vegemite (just a little) in sauces, gravies, soups etc. when I cook as it adds a nice flavor. Plus my dog loves Vegemite (straight from the spoon or on toast)!

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Vegemite is certainly an acquired taste, but I believe it's addictive!

 

Once you eat it, you will be forever hooked. It has the same effect as Tabasco ...

 

"My name is Bruce, and I'm a Tabasco-holic ..."

 

Ooops, sorry -- wrong meeting! :D

 

Vegemite is best eaten:

 

• on warm toast, over melted butter

• on fresh, straight-from-the-oven bread, with plenty of butter

• on crackers, mixed with cream cheese

• in soups and stews, as stock (with hot water)

 

Once you're used to it, you can use it thicker -- as a "native", I can spread it 1/4" thick over 1/4 butter on bread and not turn a hair.

 

Here's a tip: If you find Vegemite "burny", put it on your bread or cracker first, THEN put the butter/marg on top -- it seems to smooth it out.

 

Cheers

 

Bruce

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What does "burny" mean? Is it a "down under" expression?

 

No, Mike, just me being silly :rolleyes:, that's all. Some people find Vegemite so "salty" that it burns their tastebuds.

 

Cheers

 

Bruce

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Now this will really confuse you Mike!

 

marmite.gif

 

In Australia they have Vegemite ,and in NZ we have Marmite.....

you will be spoiled for choice!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Marmite

Marmite is New Zealand’s original yeast spread that’s been long valued as an excellent source of B complex vitamins, folate and vitamin B12. It’s the original yeast spread with iron. Try Marmite with avocado on hot toast, bread or crackers. And for a tasty addition, add Marmite to stir-fries, pasta and soups.

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My Kiwi colleague is gonna hate this :D , but Marmite is no competition whatsoever for Vegemite. It is overly-sweet, bland and just ... yerk by comparison. :rolleyes:

 

Forget these false prophets -- stay with the "real thing".:D

 

Bruce

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My goodness, I certainly didn't want to start an international conflict here. :D

I will just have to try both and give an unbiased opinion of which one is my favorite. Notice that I won't say which one is best, since I don't want to add another country to this very important issue.

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Thank you for adding a little confusion to these down under delights. Do marmite and vegemite have a similar taste? Are they basically the same product with a different name?

 

Yep, sure are - both taste like axle grease...:D

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  • 1 month later...

Most of the souveniers were made in China from Aussie designs but were well priced. There were some Oz made t shirts with great designs at 20-30$ au vs, $5 for China made, boumerangs ran from a few $ to over $100 for hand made and Digeridoos well over $100 and too big for your suitcase.

As for Veimite, there are small packs on the ship's buffet and try it there or take afew to bring back to friends you don't like. It's a yeast product and tastes like S---.

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Like almost everyone born in Australia, I was brought up on the stuff.

There are two main classes of Vegemite eaters in Australia, the thick spreaders and the thin spreaders. It all depends on how your mother introduced you to the stuff.

All people who try Vegemite for the first time should be 'thin spreaders'.

Take a piece of hot toast an apply liberal amounts of butter. Apply a small amount of Vegemite (just covering the tip of the knife - less than quarter of a teaspoon), evenly over the toast. (It should just look like a few dark streaks across the toast).

 

At home, a small jar lasts me about 2-3 years, having one or two slices of toast a week. I sit firmly in the 'thin spreader' camp. I really enjoy the taste, but if it's spread too thickly it tastes revolting (JMHO).

 

Enjoy (or not;) ).

 

Steve.

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Take a piece of hot toast an apply liberal amounts of butter. Apply a small amount of Vegemite (just covering the tip of the knife - less than quarter of a teaspoon), evenly over the toast. (It should just look like a few dark streaks across the toast).

Steve.

 

then.....scrape off all the vegemite and eat the buttered toast

David :D :rolleyes:

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