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Mom needs to bring oxygen to cruise


Woodfaerie

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Has anyone cruised with an oxygen tank? We are planning a big family cruise for 2010. My mother is on oxygen, uses a portable unit but needs the "mother ship" to refill it, especially for 5 days or so. I think I can get the oxygen company to get the main tank (Mother ship) to the pier so it can be put into her room. Looks like airlines will let her travel with her portable unit with a ton of paperwork filled out by her doctor. It would be very helpful to hear of any personal experiences any of you have had regarding traveling with oxygen units.

 

Carnival FAQ's say she can travel with her unit as long as its not liquid oxygen.

 

Mom is spry, she even teaches line dancing to seniors, but bottom line is, needs her o2 for healthier breathing.

 

thanks so much for any input you can give.

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Has anyone cruised with an oxygen tank? We are planning a big family cruise for 2010. My mother is on oxygen, uses a portable unit but needs the "mother ship" to refill it, especially for 5 days or so. I think I can get the oxygen company to get the main tank (Mother ship) to the pier so it can be put into her room. Looks like airlines will let her travel with her portable unit with a ton of paperwork filled out by her doctor. It would be very helpful to hear of any personal experiences any of you have had regarding traveling with oxygen units.

 

Carnival FAQ's say she can travel with her unit as long as its not liquid oxygen.

 

Mom is spry, she even teaches line dancing to seniors, but bottom line is, needs her o2 for healthier breathing.

 

The lack of standardized rules within this industry can make traveling with oxygen on cruise lines quite challenging. Each cruise line, and sometimes, even ships within a cruise line, can have slightly different requirements for passengers who need oxygen.

Here are the most prevalent guidelines involved with shipboard oxygen.

Before making a reservation, potential passengers need to get a letter from their physician describing their fitness for travel, the oxygen dosage required, and a statement attesting that they require medical oxygen.

Your next step is to contact the cruise line’s medical department before the cruise so that your medical issues can be evaluated. If approved for travel by the cruise line, you may then proceed with your reservations.

You will be required to make arrangements with both the oxygen supplier and the cruise line for the delivery and onboard storage of enough oxygen to last the entire trip. If planning shore excursions, you will have to make separate arrangements for the delivery of oxygen to your ports of call. Generally, you will not be allowed to take oxygen off the ship.

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My mother just went on a cruise and used O2. You can't fly with O2 tanks, it has to be a concentrator. That said, unless you are driving to the ship you would have to rent a concentrator for the flight and cruise. If she can fly without the O2 you can then rent O2 in the bottles to be delivered to the ship. my mother took the concentrator and 3 batteries. Also, check the Disabled board for more info.

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I would email

 

specialneeds@carnival.com

 

they will send you a medical form to fill out.

 

ALSO...I would go over to the Disabilities section of this board. There are lots of folks who have already had this experience and can share some tips!!!

 

I lost Mom 2 years ago at the spry age of 97. Cherish these years you have left to made great memories!!

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My brother in law sailed with us 2 times on oxygen. Both Carnival - both treated the tanks differently.

 

Elation (was out of galveston then). Let him bring all his Medium size bottles with him to the room. He also had his concentrator machine for use at night and in the room. He brought enough bottles to last the week.

 

Conquest (was then out of New Orleans). Took all his oxygen (this time the smaller backpack size) and stored them elsewhere on the ship -he was only allowed 2 bottles at a time in the room. Which meant if he was running out he had to find the room steward who would exchange the bottles. He had his concentrator in the room for use in the room and at night.

 

Both times we booked inside cabins and were upgraded to outside, I believe this was due to the oxygen bottles in the room. Fire safety issues.

 

And since all 4 of us were carrying bottles, we were whisked through the VIP and right onto the ship.

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.............Looks like airlines will let her travel with her portable unit with a ton of paperwork filled out by her doctor.........
.........You can't fly with O2 tanks, it has to be a concentrator.............
dlbutler5 is right about the concentrator on an airline. If it isn't an approved unit then no amount of paperwork by her doctor will get it on the plane. They also require spare batteries since there is no way to plug it in while on the plane. Below are some excerpts from the Southwest FAQ on Oxygen:

"While Portable Oxygen Concentrator (POC) devices may be brought onboard our flights, in accordance with Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) No. 106, 14 CFR Part 121, only the AirSep FreeStyle, AirSep LifeStyle, Inogen One, Respironics EverGo, and SeQual Technology Eclipse POC models are approved for use during flight."

 

".....To be used onboard the aircraft, the AirSep FreeStyle, AirSep LifeStyle, Inogen One, Respironics EverGo, and SeQual Technology Eclipse POCs must have a label attached indicating that it has been approved for use in aircraft......"

 

"....The Customer must have a sufficient number of fully charged batteries to cover the duration of the flight and anticipated delays, plus one extra battery for unanticipated delays. Extra batteries must be packaged for carryon in a manner to prevent short circuit. Battery terminals must either be recessed or packaged so as to prevent contact with metal objects, including terminals of other batteries."

 

"....The Customer must have a letter from his/her physician on letterhead with an issue-date of no more than one year prior to flight departure date. You may have your physician draft his/her own letter or have your physician select the link and print and fill out our Physician Consent Form. (This document will only be accepted if it is printed on the physician's letterhead.)......."

 

http://www.southwest.com/travel_center/disability.html#oxygen

 

I'm not trying to overwhelm you with this airline info, but I know of a friend who was totally blindsided by all the airline requirements and I don't want your trip cut short in the beginning because of the airline. I'm sure that her oxygen supplier will know the requirements but I'd double check with your specific airlines to make sure everything is approved to their standards.

 

I hope you have a wonderful trip/cruise and you're starting off right by making sure you are prepared.

 

Edit: Since you aren't traveling until 2010 the technology for concentrators should have them even smaller with a longer battery life by then.

 

John

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I had no idea there was a disabilities sections of the boards. that will be a great help in addition to all of the helpful information and links you all have provided.

 

Mom went on one cruise and loved it. I want to create as many memories with her as possibile and don't want her condition to stop that from happening.

 

Though my posting is minimal on these boards, I have always received so much help with the few questions I have asked for feedback on.

 

What a great bunch of fellow travelers you all are. thank you!

Deb aka Woodfaerie

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I meet a lady on the Conquest who was quite put out that Carnival required a $25 deposit on a extention cord for her CPAC? breathing unit. Apparantly other cruise lines dont require a deposit.

 

Bring your own extension cord or be prepared to pay the deposit.

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I just sailed with my dad and his oxygen. It was a lot of work to get all the ducks in a row, but was worth it! We sailed out of Miami on valor. We ordered small tanks from cruise ship assist. He has a portable Inogen. We used that for flights on Continental. We had paperwork for both air and ship. Valor said they were going to store all but 2 tanks, but never took them. When you check in for the airline, make sure you remind them about the portable.

 

good luck

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