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Flaming Baked Alaska Parade


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In my 2005 Sapphire Princess cruise to Alaska, on the last formal night there was a waiter parade in which displayed the Baked Alaska dessert authentically in that the actual flame was used and the entire dining room played the Arrow song Hot Hot Hot. Attached is a picture from my 2005 Sapphire Princess cruise showing the Baked Alaska with the real fire.

 

In my 2022 Emerald Princess cruise across the Panama Canal, there was another Baked Alaska parade but there was no accompanying music but even worse, an artificial light was put on the cake and there was no real flame.

 

Do you know if there's any other cruise lines which serve Baked Alaska with a real flame these days?

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19 hours ago, Robbie555 said:

In my 2005 Sapphire Princess cruise to Alaska, on the last formal night there was a waiter parade in which displayed the Baked Alaska dessert authentically in that the actual flame was used and the entire dining room played the Arrow song Hot Hot Hot. Attached is a picture from my 2005 Sapphire Princess cruise showing the Baked Alaska with the real fire.

 

In my 2022 Emerald Princess cruise across the Panama Canal, there was another Baked Alaska parade but there was no accompanying music but even worse, an artificial light was put on the cake and there was no real flame.

 

Do you know if there's any other cruise lines which serve Baked Alaska with a real flame these days?

 

 

Highly unlikely due to Fire Detection & Extinguishing Regulations.

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Those days are long gone…sadly.  As Heidi said…the fire regulations have killed the Baked Alaska parade.  I, for one, love a good Baked Alaska…cake and ice cream smothered in a nougat meringue…yummm.  I was witness to many a dining room parade over the years and I enjoyed every one of them.

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On 1/15/2023 at 7:14 PM, CGTNORMANDIE said:

Those days are long gone…sadly.  As Heidi said…the fire regulations have killed the Baked Alaska parade.  I, for one, love a good Baked Alaska…cake and ice cream smothered in a nougat meringue…yummm.  I was witness to many a dining room parade over the years and I enjoyed every one of them.

 

The Baked Alaskas back in the 70's and 80's on the Princess ships were very enjoyable, as I often had a piece every week. By the mid-2000's I found the quality started to decline, especially the meringue - just didn't taste the same as the originals.  Consequently, I haven't tried it since.

 

I concur, the MDR parades were enjoyable to watch, even having them every week, regardless of where we were cruising.

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  • 6 months later...
28 minutes ago, DC225 said:

I'm all for nostalgia, but I always thought the Baked Alaska parade was so incredibly cheesy.  It's one of the few aspects of "old time cruising" I don't really miss.

It got to be cheesy but years ago it was a fun spectacle that pax expected at the end of their cruise.  This was in a time when cruises lasted two weeks or more.  Everyone was dressed in their best formal attire, the lights were dimmed and the waiters appeared marching in cadence to the Radetsky March.  It was a right of passage and a grand tradition.  

Edited by CGTNORMANDIE
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4 hours ago, DC225 said:

I'm all for nostalgia, but I always thought the Baked Alaska parade was so incredibly cheesy.  It's one of the few aspects of "old time cruising" I don't really miss.

 

Just wondering what time frame you are making reference to with respect to, "Old time cruising". Back in the 1970's, I actually enjoyed the parades and I used to see them every week for 4 months.

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5 hours ago, CGTNORMANDIE said:

It got to be cheesy but years ago it was a fun spectacle that pax expected at the end of their cruise.  This was in a time when cruises lasted two weeks or more.  Everyone was dressed in their best formal attire, the lights were dimmed and the waiters appeared marching in cadence to the Radetsky March.  It was a right of passage and a grand tradition.  

Those were the days that nobody on the cruise wore a tee shirt daytime.Men wore button down shirts .

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1 minute ago, CGTNORMANDIE said:
1 hour ago, lenquixote66 said:

Those were the days that nobody on the cruise wore a tee shirt daytime.Men wore button down shirts .

Back in the time I’m talking about men wore tuxedos and evening jackets depending on the climate.  (You wouldn’t want to see Humphrey Bogart wearing a tux in Casablanca would you?)  Everyone was dressed formally and the MDR was decked out along with all the waiters.  

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2 hours ago, CGTNORMANDIE said:

Back in the time I’m talking about men wore tuxedos and evening jackets depending on the climate.  (You wouldn’t want to see Humphrey Bogart wearing a tux in Casablanca would you?)  Everyone was dressed formally and the MDR was decked out along with all the waiters.  

I am older than you and vividly remember those days.

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14 hours ago, CGTNORMANDIE said:

Yes Len you might be older than I but I started crossing and cruising in 1965…lol.  I think that makes us even. 🙂

I am 100% positive that I am older than you.I was vacationing as far back as 1961 but just not cruising

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Enjoying the banter.😁 I'll suggest it's a safe bet I'm younger than both you chaps, but still remember the great days of cruising. I was fortunate to catch the last 10 yrs, or so.

 

Used to dress up every evening in my heavily starched Mess Kit, enjoying great company, meals and service from professional waiters/waitresses. Proper "Silver Service" is an art and they were masters of their trade.

 

In addition to everyone dressed in their finery, who can forget the pastas, banana flambe, cherry jubilee, etc finished at the table.

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43 minutes ago, Heidi13 said:

Enjoying the banter.😁 I'll suggest it's a safe bet I'm younger than both you chaps, but still remember the great days of cruising. I was fortunate to catch the last 10 yrs, or so.

 

Used to dress up every evening in my heavily starched Mess Kit, enjoying great company, meals and service from professional waiters/waitresses. Proper "Silver Service" is an art and they were masters of their trade.

 

In addition to everyone dressed in their finery, who can forget the pastas, banana flambe, cherry jubilee, etc finished at the table.

And don’t forget the flaming Crepes Suzette!  

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  • 2 weeks later...

Baked Alaska came our way in 1867, after the USA bought Alaska from Russia.

The dish was originally from France and called "Omelette Norwegge"

A Chef at Delmonicos in NYC ripped off the recipe and changed the name.

 

Over the past 150 years countless people on cruise ships have been seriously burned when their hair and clothing caught fire from the passing parade in the dining room.

Today's fire and safety regulations on most cruise lines prohibit flaming parades of any kind.

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