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Coral Princess currently down with a nasty case of the noro illness


Goldryder

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# Cruise Line: Princess Cruises

# Cruise Ship: Coral Princess

# Voyage Dates: 2/3-2/13

# Number of ill passengers out of total number of passengers at the end of the voyage: 164 of 1996 (8.22%)

# Number of ill crew out of total number of crew at the end of the voyage: 10 of 885 (1.13%)

# Predominant symptoms: diarrhea and vomiting

# Actions: In response to the outbreak, Princess Cruises and the crew aboard the ship took the following actions:

 

* increased cleaning and disinfection procedures,

* is sending daily updates to CDC and will do so until the number of ill people returns to expected levels,

* the ship has collected stool specimens onboard for analysis; results are pending.

 

# On February 11th, VSP staff will board the ship Ocho Rios, Jamaica to conduct an onboard environmental health assessment. Princess Cruises will continue to send daily updates to VSP until the number of ill people returns to expected levels.

 

Still got a couple days of the cruise to finish, so figure could well go upwards. There is also a good chance of a knock-on effect to the next cruise too.

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What the heck is a "knock-on" effect:confused:

 

It's English (UK) terminology which is a phenomenon that follows and is caused by a previous phenomenon. In other words, the next cruise is going to have lots of restrictions re: sanitary procedure.

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If you become sick with this virus during a cruise and need IV fluids or a doctor's care, who pays for it? If your vacation is ruined due to the fault of the cruise line not maintaining safe and sanitary conditions, are they not required to provide the cruiser with medical care if it is needed? I ask this question not in an accusatory manner, but only to know what to expect in the future.

 

I do hope they are able to rid the ship of the virus so people can enjoy their cruise without the fear of being sick.

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If your vacation is ruined due to the fault of the cruise line not maintaining safe and sanitary conditions...
With all due respect, I think this statement is unfair. It is not the cruise line's fault. Every ship I've been on is virtually immaculate. Cleaning is constant. It is WE PASSENGERS who are the culprits. We bring it onboard, and we spread it by not practicing good hygiene ourselves. I can't tell you how many times I have seen people leave a bathroom without getting their hands wet. Let alone washing them thoroughly as required.

 

Crew members are culpable, too. They visit ports and contract the virus. But the figures above indicate that the problem is more with passengers than crew.

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We're boarding the Coral on Friday. Any advice on how to keep the nasty "noro" away? We have our hand sanitizer and will scrub down our cabin with Clorox wipes before we leave, but any other tips? Thanks.

 

Some of the things we do (call me paranoid, but we haven't been sick yet):

 

1. Don't use the salt shakers.

2. Don't touch the elevator buttons (I use my finger covered by my blouse.)

3. Wipe down your cabin during the week. Germs get transferred by the cabin stewards who are cleaning multiple cabins. Even use those Clorox wipes on the toilet (all parts), and especially door handles and light switches.

4. Don't drink water that is left in a pitcher in the Horizon Court. Drink bottled water.

5. Wash your hands right after eating every meal.

6. Avoid using the heavily used public bathrooms and if you must, do not touch anything! Use your blouse-covered-hand to open doors, lock the bathroom door and use your foot to flush the toilet.

7. In the public bathrooms, do not turn off the bathroom water faucet with your bare hand. People who had dirty hands have been turning it on. Your clean hand will be touching germs. Use a paper towel whenever possible.

8. Bring antibacterial soap. We always bring 2 pumps full of it. I know it doesn't kill a lot of germs, but the peace-of-mind is worth it. Who wants to use a slimmy soap bar that's been sitting in water that has been used for other dirty hands and possibly sprayed with who knows what kind of cleaners by the cabin steward? bleck.

 

Any other tips anyone?

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Some of the things we do (call me paranoid, but we haven't been sick yet):

 

1. Don't use the salt shakers.

2. Don't touch the elevator buttons (I use my finger covered by my blouse.)

3. Wipe down your cabin during the week. Germs get transferred by the cabin stewards who are cleaning multiple cabins. Even use those Clorox wipes on the toilet (all parts), and especially door handles and light switches.

4. Don't drink water that is left in a pitcher in the Horizon Court. Drink bottled water.

5. Wash your hands right after eating every meal.

6. Avoid using the heavily used public bathrooms and if you must, do not touch anything! Use your blouse-covered-hand to open doors, lock the bathroom door and use your foot to flush the toilet.

7. In the public bathrooms, do not turn off the bathroom water faucet with your bare hand. People who had dirty hands have been turning it on. Your clean hand will be touching germs. Use a paper towel whenever possible.

8. Bring antibacterial soap. We always bring 2 pumps full of it. I know it doesn't kill a lot of germs, but the peace-of-mind is worth it. Who wants to use a slimmy soap bar that's been sitting in water that has been used for other dirty hands and possibly sprayed with who knows what kind of cleaners by the cabin steward? bleck.

 

Any other tips anyone?

 

Sounds more like a combat course than a holiday !!!

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Some of the things we do (call me paranoid, but we haven't been sick yet):

 

1. Don't use the salt shakers.

2. Don't touch the elevator buttons (I use my finger covered by my blouse.)

3. Wipe down your cabin during the week. Germs get transferred by the cabin stewards who are cleaning multiple cabins. Even use those Clorox wipes on the toilet (all parts), and especially door handles and light switches.

4. Don't drink water that is left in a pitcher in the Horizon Court. Drink bottled water.

5. Wash your hands right after eating every meal.

6. Avoid using the heavily used public bathrooms and if you must, do not touch anything! Use your blouse-covered-hand to open doors, lock the bathroom door and use your foot to flush the toilet.

7. In the public bathrooms, do not turn off the bathroom water faucet with your bare hand. People who had dirty hands have been turning it on. Your clean hand will be touching germs. Use a paper towel whenever possible.

8. Bring antibacterial soap. We always bring 2 pumps full of it. I know it doesn't kill a lot of germs, but the peace-of-mind is worth it. Who wants to use a slimmy soap bar that's been sitting in water that has been used for other dirty hands and possibly sprayed with who knows what kind of cleaners by the cabin steward? bleck.

 

Any other tips anyone?

 

Guess I live life on the wild side when it comes to risking germs. I don't practice any of those recommendations, although they are all valid ways that Noro could potentially be spread. And, unrelated to your post, I couldn't possibly disagree more with the earlier post blaming the ship for the transmission of Noro, I've yet to be on a ship that wasn't maintained in immaculate condition. Look at the ratings for the ships, they're almost all in the mid to upper 90's for their maintenance and hygiene.

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We always use hand sanitizers, either towelettes or in a small liquid dispenser, after handing back the menus to our waiter in the dining rooms. We also always use the hand sanitizers before AND after we getting food in the buffet. Knuckles on the elevator buttons. So far we have escaped any stomach problems. Now as for all those damn sneezers on board who never cover their mouth before letting go, usually sitting behind you in the theater.........

 

49er

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I am not happy to hear this, but oh well. We sail out on the Coral on the 9th. Hopefully they will get this taken care of. I have never been on a cruise that had Noro, and I don't want my first 14 day one to be the first that does.

 

I understand the need for precaution, but I really don't want to spend 2 weeks not being able to serve myself at the buffet. That will be really annoying.

 

I guess I will just carry a small bottle of hand sanitizer with me to use before I eat.

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There was no blame intended of the ship in my earlier post. :confused: I have not yet cruised even though I have booked my first one later in the year. I asked the question so that I would KNOW what to expect should there be such an event during my cruise. People should have a reasonable expectation of being in a safe and sanitary environment regardless of the origination of any virus. As it has been stated on this board previously, there are instances when crew are as culpable as passengers. I am sure they do an admirable job in containing any potential outbreak. Otherwise, I personally would not want to board a cruise ship. since I am sure they do such a good job, I am looking forward to my first cruise.

 

I notice that my original question has still not been answered as of yet. I have hope that it will be answered though, instead of being flamed for asking it.

 

I do appreciate the good tips being offered! ;)

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# Cruise Line: Princess Cruises

# Cruise Ship: Coral Princess

# Voyage Dates: 2/3-2/13

# Number of ill passengers out of total number of passengers at the end of the voyage: 164 of 1996 (8.22%)

# Number of ill crew out of total number of crew at the end of the voyage: 10 of 885 (1.13%)

# Predominant symptoms: diarrhea and vomiting

# Actions: In response to the outbreak, Princess Cruises and the crew aboard the ship took the following actions:

 

* increased cleaning and disinfection procedures,

* is sending daily updates to CDC and will do so until the number of ill people returns to expected levels,

* the ship has collected stool specimens onboard for analysis; results are pending.

 

# On February 11th, VSP staff will board the ship Ocho Rios, Jamaica to conduct an onboard environmental health assessment. Princess Cruises will continue to send daily updates to VSP until the number of ill people returns to expected levels.

 

Still got a couple days of the cruise to finish, so figure could well go upwards. There is also a good chance of a knock-on effect to the next cruise too.

 

:confused: Where do I send the stool sample ?

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If you become sick with this virus during a cruise and need IV fluids or a doctor's care, who pays for it?

 

You do.

 

 

If your vacation is ruined due to the fault of the cruise line not maintaining safe and sanitary conditions, are they not required to provide the cruiser with medical care if it is needed? I ask this question not in an accusatory manner, but only to know what to expect in the future.

 

If your vacation is ruined (and that's really stretching it), it is not the fault of the cruise line. They are cleaning constantly. And they will provide you with medical care, but you will be billed for it.

 

.

 

Here is the answer to your original question, though I don't think you will like these answers.

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was on the RCCL Liberty when they had a BIG outbreak of the noro- 2 people in our family got it while on board and 1 child throwing up at disembark and all the way home in car>EWWWW Even the customs people were had masks on as we left.

I think the buffet is a big spreader of the illness. You sanitize your hand on the way in get your food, eat with hands ect then go back to get more food and touch the handles. I always sanitize before i sit down to eat each time. Also wash wash wash your hands. The ship should be fine next cruise. The liberty had a few outbreaks after ours and none after that one..

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There was no blame intended of the ship in my earlier post. :confused: I have not yet cruised even though I have booked my first one later in the year. I asked the question so that I would KNOW what to expect should there be such an event during my cruise. People should have a reasonable expectation of being in a safe and sanitary environment regardless of the origination of any virus. As it has been stated on this board previously, there are instances when crew are as culpable as passengers. I am sure they do an admirable job in containing any potential outbreak. Otherwise, I personally would not want to board a cruise ship. since I am sure they do such a good job, I am looking forward to my first cruise.

 

I notice that my original question has still not been answered as of yet. I have hope that it will be answered though, instead of being flamed for asking it.

 

I do appreciate the good tips being offered! ;)

 

Sorry, neglected to answer your question. If you become sick or injured on the ship for any reason, your personal health insurance (and your travel insurance if need be, you did make sure to get travel insurance correct?) are generally, but not always, responsible for all costs incurred. Health insurance on board or in a port-of-call can be extremely expensive in some cases, make sure you have adequate insurance to cover the possibilities. A friend had to be put on a medical evacuation for an injury (stupid but serious injury influenced by his own negligence) and the costs totaled well over $75,000 once it was all said and done and it was covered by travel insurance and personal insurance.

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As jhannah stated, "It's we passengers who spread it". We were on a cruise when the Noro was going around and one of the people seated at our table for lunch said he was supposed to be in quarantine because of it but he came to lunch anyway. Some people have no consideration for others. We use the hand sanitizer and wash our hands frequently and still had the Noro twice on cruises. We were not charged for medical treatment and one cruise line gave us $200 onboard credit. We were quarantined in our cabin for 24 hours and then given a medical release. I don't know about all cruise lines and whether they charge. I can only give you info about our experiences.

Jimanne1

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...I notice that my original question has still not been answered as of yet. I have hope that it will be answered though, instead of being flamed for asking it.

 

Following my recent "illness" onboard the Emerald Princess 1/19-1/29, DH and I fully expected to be charged for the nurse's visit to our stateroom on the morning of January 27 after I had reported vomiting and diarrhea and suspected that I might have the dreaded Noro. I did not summon the nurse, but the Chief Physician wanted her to see me to determine the severity of my symptoms. We were pleasantly surprised to see no medical charges on our final shipboard statement.

 

Below is an earlier post about my brief illness on the Emerald. While no one wants to be sick on vacation, I was treated like a queen, and not being charged for the "house call" was a royal treat :)

During the wee hours of Tuesday (the 27th), the ship was really rocking and rolling. I don't often get seasick but woke several times with a knot in my stomach and dizziness. We didn't get up in time for breakfast in the dining room and went to the IC for coffee. Even while sitting, I felt faint and told DH that I really should get back to the cabin and lie down. I vomited once and had an episode of diarrhea about an hour later. Since there is always the possibility of Norovirus onboard, we reported my symptoms to Passenger Services.

 

A nurse called an hour or so later and wanted to know if I was still unwell. DH told her that I had taken Immodium and was resting. After the initial episode, I had no symptoms other than feeling weak and a little dizzy. Nurse Andrea said that I should stay in my stateroom and that she would contact me again later to see how I was feeling. The ship's doctor must have decided to investigate further, so the nurse came to our cabin to see me. She took my temp (low-grade fever), BP (fine), and asked me about my symptoms. I told Nurse Andrea that I thought the overnight sailing had been rough and that I had probably had too much sun, a little too much food, and too much wine, all of which contributed to my feeling unwell.

 

Since I had already taken Immodium and had plenty of Tylenol, the nurse didn't give me additional meds. I wasn't nauseous and didn't require an injection. The nurse requested that I remain in the cabin for 24 hours following the initial episode (11:00AM). DH was free to come and go as he pleased but was advised to not eat at the buffet. I had not eaten since dinner the night before and was encouraged to order items from a special room service menu. Nurse Andrea suggested chicken broth, rolls, and tea, and I had to drink plenty of water to stay hydrated. She also made arrangements for a special cleaning team to sanitize our stateroom.

 

DH ordered the suggested items that were delivered promptly by a friendly and concerned crew member. He said that he hoped that I would feel better soon and wished me Happy Birthday. The cleaning team was also very caring and expressed their well-wishes. Our cabin steward, who was always attentive and personable, wasn't allowed to come into the room but expressed his well-wishes from the doorway and wished me Happy Birthday. The nurse had told him that I wasn't very sick and would most likely be able to leave the cabin the following day.

 

I slept for a little while and woke up feeling hungry, so I ordered Jello, crackers, and tea. I watched news programs and did some word puzzles. This wasn't exactly the way that I had intended to spend my shipboard birthday, but I was feeling much better about 12 hours after my symptoms began. I slept well during the night and ordered oatmeal, toast, and tea for breakfast. The nurse called at 10:30, and since I had experienced no further symptoms and was feeling fine, I was released from my "confinement" at 11:00. At no time did the ship's nurse indicate that I had NV, but DH and I were pleased that every precaution is taken to quell the possibility of spreading the virus among additional passengers.

 

DH and I rarely eat in the buffet and had breakfast there only once during the cruise on the morning that we were in St. Thomas; we had no plans and slept later than usual. If I were to attribute my brief "illness" to something very specific, it would have to be a bagel, lox, or cream cheese. Both DH and I had eggs cooked to order, DH had bacon and brown toast, while I had the bagel w/lox & cream cheese. I can't imagine someone handling lox or cream cheese without tongs, but we saw a passenger help herself to an English muffin with her bare hands. This is precisely the reason that we try to have our meals in the dining room and rarely visit HC/CC. If I did have a very mild case of Noro, the onset was within the 24-hour incubation period of the virus following breakfast in HC.

 

Bon Voyage!

Chris

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Just basically repeating what others have said... Passengers arriving on planes from all over the country are the ones who bring the virus on board, and like somebody else said, it's amazing how many people don't bother to wash their hands after using the public restrooms. After 14 cruises and never yet having gotten sick (knock on wood!) I'm convinced that hand washing with soap and warm water makes more of a difference than sanitizer gel. Also, try to avoid door handles, elevator buttons, hand rails and other commonly touched surfaces. And wipe down remotes, reading light knobs, refrigerator handles, the handle on the safe etc.

 

One of the first indications that there is an outbreak is when the salt and pepper shakers and the bread baskets disappear from the tables!

 

Let's face it, anywhere where 3000 people are in a confined space you can catch something! You really have to be proactive...

 

BTW, the use of the medical staff and onboard clinic is not free by any means!!! The charges will show up on your bill and they can be amazing. :eek:

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