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A Silver Shadow Over The World - December 2023 to May 2024


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I think it was @Port Power who mentioned that they wore a mesh net for their morning walks.  I wanted something that would fit over our hats.  Myster and I both wear Tilley hats on our adventures.

 

My Tilley

 

Michele1.JPG.151cfc72b56404801699ea7f3156ff92.JPG

 

 

Myster's Tilley

Bill.jpg.cbeab22c5bf1ea689265b1a0cf192978.jpg

 

I ordered a 2 pack of mesh nets.

 

https://www.amazon.ca/EVEN-NATURALS-Mosquito-Protection-Chemical/dp/B09GGDC37Y/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1PFNGNGFVXFRC&keywords=mosquito%2Bhead%2Bnet%2Bmesh&qid=1696252454&refinements=p_36%3A12035760011&rnid=12035759011&s=hpc&sprefix=Mosquito%2BHead%2BNet%2Caps%2C255&sr=1-1&th=1

 

 


 

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30 minutes ago, mysty said:

I think it was @Port Power who mentioned that they wore a mesh net for their morning walks.  I wanted something that would fit over our hats.  Myster and I both wear Tilley hats on our adventures.

 

My Tilley

 

Michele1.JPG.151cfc72b56404801699ea7f3156ff92.JPG

 

 

Myster's Tilley

Bill.jpg.cbeab22c5bf1ea689265b1a0cf192978.jpg

 

I ordered a 2 pack of mesh nets.

 

https://www.amazon.ca/EVEN-NATURALS-Mosquito-Protection-Chemical/dp/B09GGDC37Y/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1PFNGNGFVXFRC&keywords=mosquito%2Bhead%2Bnet%2Bmesh&qid=1696252454&refinements=p_36%3A12035760011&rnid=12035759011&s=hpc&sprefix=Mosquito%2BHead%2BNet%2Caps%2C255&sr=1-1&th=1

 

 


 

I bought a hat with mesh attached for Uluru

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7 minutes ago, JoGay said:

I bought a hat with mesh attached for Uluru

 

Excellent!   I think I'm also going to fashion a cork creation that will fit over our hats and sit on the inner junction of the brim.  Something like this...

 

cork.jpg.e934d3b5223528650b4c109cf64c977e.jpg

Twine and wine corks.  Not sure how effective it would be.  However, a fun project!  😅

Edited by mysty
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5 hours ago, mysty said:

I think it was @Port Power who mentioned that they wore a mesh net for their morning walks.  I wanted something that would fit over our hats.  Myster and I both wear Tilley hats on our adventures.

 

My Tilley

 

Michele1.JPG.151cfc72b56404801699ea7f3156ff92.JPG

 

 

Myster's Tilley

Bill.jpg.cbeab22c5bf1ea689265b1a0cf192978.jpg

 

I ordered a 2 pack of mesh nets.

 

https://www.amazon.ca/EVEN-NATURALS-Mosquito-Protection-Chemical/dp/B09GGDC37Y/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1PFNGNGFVXFRC&keywords=mosquito%2Bhead%2Bnet%2Bmesh&qid=1696252454&refinements=p_36%3A12035760011&rnid=12035759011&s=hpc&sprefix=Mosquito%2BHead%2BNet%2Caps%2C255&sr=1-1&th=1

 

 


 


Yes, that is similar to the net I have. My net is green, which is good for blocking the sun a bit more.  I’m glad you found one.

 

The net is actually enough.  Keep those corks for a pin board.

Edited by Port Power
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19 minutes ago, Port Power said:


Yes, that is similar to the net I have. My net is green, which is good for blocking the sun a bit more.  I’m glad you found one.

 

The net is actually enough.  Keep those corks for a pin board.

 

@Port Power , thank you!  I'm very glad that you mentioned the net!  A much better option for us! 😁

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Just as @Grand Duchess ,  I really enjoy Bill Bryson.  Unfortunately Janet Maslin apparently did not enjoy this particular book..  Here is a link to her review of In  A Sunburned Country titled Say, Mate, Just What Is It About You Australians?  Needless to say, I do not agree with her.

 

https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/library/books/060500bryson-book-review.html

 

Here are some bits from the article....

.

"Because if I open them I'm afraid I'll bleed to death," replies a hung-over Mr. Bryson to a friend who asks why his eyes are shut."  .......(I could not stop laughing at this line in the book.  I don't think Ms. Maslin shares my sense of humour).

 

"The monumental emptiness of Australia is not easy to convey," Bryson also notes. And in a book that also finds time for observations about houseflies and the biting ants that have infested Brisbane: "That's the thing about Australia, you see. It teems with interesting stuff, but at the same time it's so vast and empty and forbidding that it generally takes a remarkable stroke of luck to find it." 

 

"There is also a surprising obliviousness to the wild-eyed popular culture behind such eccentric creations as "Mad Max," "Muriel's Wedding," "Crocodile Dundee," with no glimpse of what it is about Australians that is reflected in such idiosyncratic hits. And the rowdy, bone-dry Australian sense of humor, which the reader might expect to find celebrated here, is only occasionally heard above the more subdued Brysoniana. But when the author expresses surprise to learn that a cricket match is being held in Adelaide, a bystander does say to him: "Well, either that or thirty thousand people have made one pretty amazing bloody mistake, wouldn't you say?""

 

This article is the main reason that I avoid reading book critics.  I usually go by reviews from the great unwashed.  😁

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This morning I was checking http://mysilversea.com as I do every day checking for updates for excursion listings.  I also had to change the address of our emergency contact.  Surprise!  There is now a Health Confirmation that is required to be completed.  I'm very sure this wasn't there when I completed the Guest Information information a long while ago.  It outlines the requirements regarding the COVID vaccine and requires that you upload your vaccine records.  If you haven't checked the completeness of your Guest Information, you might just check that all is in order.

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Look for this...

 

Capture.JPG.e7d3653fdbd1b632ea52d983b4968fde.JPG

 

 

Silversea Vaccination Status Requirements

Fully Vaccinated Guests: All embarking crew and guests aged 12 years and older must be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 at least two weeks prior to embarkation. Only guests fully vaccinated with approved WHO vaccines (see here) will be permitted to board. A copy of your vaccination certificate must be uploaded in advance of your travels. In addition, in order to board the ship, the vaccination certificate must be printed in two copies and presented at the terminal during the check-in and embarkation process.

 

Up To Date Vaccinated Guests: You will need to be fully up to date with your vaccine status (‘up to date’ means a person has received all recommended COVID-19 vaccines, including any booster dose(s) when eligible), in accordance with each of the countries you plan to visit on your respective itinerary. We recommend that you refer to each country’s official government website to understand the complete vaccination status requirements for entry, as well as the ability to roam freely, enter restaurants, cultural institutions, etc.

 

Unvaccinated Guests: Silversea will accept unvaccinated guests aged 0 to 11 years old ONLY. All other Silversea guests must be fully vaccinated to board one of our vessels.


Country requirements: Whilst Silversea will facilitate entry into each port of call during each voyage, guests are responsible for complying with entry requirements for the country of embarkation, as well as the travel requirements affecting their return journeys.
 

Note:  Guests over the age of 11 must now be fully vaccinated.

 

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7 hours ago, mysty said:

This morning I was checking http://mysilversea.com as I do every day checking for updates for excursion listings.  I also had to change the address of our emergency contact.  Surprise!  There is now a Health Confirmation that is required to be completed.  I'm very sure this wasn't there when I completed the Guest Information information a long while ago.  It outlines the requirements regarding the COVID vaccine and requires that you upload your vaccine records.  If you haven't checked the completeness of your Guest Information, you might just check that all is in order.

 

Thanks for the heads up; I log in once a week but it's always good to know if/when changes are made.

 

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One of the niceties from past big adventures was a booklet listing the names of the passengers taking the full world cruise.  You could opt out of having your name listed, of course.    The list was very helpful for keeping track of the folks we met especially at the beginning of the cruise when we were meeting many new people.  I hope they continue to do this.

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Hi Mysty, thanks for that Dave Barry book suggestion. It sounds so good and I will be reading it while on the Nova next month🙂

I am sure it will be a fun read while I am crossing the Atlantic!

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1 hour ago, mysty said:

Myster and I are off to celebrate Thanksgiving with our daughter and grandsons.  We'll be back on Wednesday.  Happy Thanksgiving to all who choose to celebrate!

 

1 hour ago, mysty said:

Myster and I are off to celebrate Thanksgiving with our daughter and grandsons.  We'll be back on Wednesday.  Happy Thanksgiving to all who choose to celebrate!

Happy Thanksgiving!

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I've explored literary sources for our big adventure.  Time to move to music and dance.

Hawaii -
"Traditional Hawaiian music is expressed primarily in the form of chanting. music that is designed to accompany traditional dances and ceremonies with strong ties to Hawaiian religion. It has long been thought that Hawaiian music has had a huge impact on the unification of the other Polynesian islands. Hawaiian music is celebrated throughout the year with a number of festivals and events including the Merrie Monarch Hula Festival, the Big Island Slack Key Guitar Festival, the Gabby Pahinui/Atta Isaacs Slack Key Festival, the Steel Guitar Association Festival as well as Aloha Week and the Moloka'i Music Festival. A number of jazz festivals are also hosted in Autumn.

Perhaps one of the most famous instruments used in Hawaiian music is the ukulele, a small guitar-like instrument that can be played using finger picking or strumming techniques. Despite its reputation as a distinctly Hawaiian instrument and sound, the ukulele was actually introduced to the islands by Portuguese Madeiran immigrants in the late 19th Century. However, its popularity and long history with the Hawaiian people and culture has seen it become a style of music synonymous with the islands. There are four types of ukulele available; the soprano, concert, tenor and baritone."

 

http:// https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMK6V2h2vHo


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMD1hYuAL40

 

Samoa - 

"The Music of Samoa is a complex mix of cultures and traditions, with pre- and post-European contact histories. Since American colonization, popular traditions such as rap and hip hop have been integrated into Samoan music.

Traditional Samoan musical instruments include several different distinctive instruments, including a fala, which is a rolled-up mat beaten with sticks and several types of slit drum."

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4vkaagvRJU

 

Fiji - 

"Fijian folk styles are distinct in their fusion of Polynesian and Melanesian traditions. Folk music is dominated by vocal church music, as well as dances characterized by rich and dull harmony and complex percussion made from slit drums or natural materials, such as drums.

Like their Polynesian neighbours, modern Fijians play guitar, ukulele and mandolin along with a variety of indigenous instruments, most commonly lali drums, which are now used to call the people of an area together. Lali drums were an important part of traditional Fijian culture, used as a form of communication to announce births, deaths and wars. A smaller form of the lali drum (lali ni meke) is used as a form in instrumentation. Meke is a kind of spiritual folk dance, in which dancers bodies are said to be possessed by spirits. Other percussion instruments include the derua, which are tubes made of bamboo which are stamped on mats or on the ground. "

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSZd-Fk2cNQ


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqqTi6ZGaeI

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Continuing on with the music exploration we come to

 

New Zealand - 

From Wikipedia.....https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Māori_music
"Traditional Māori music, or pūoro Māori, is composed or performed by Māori, the indigenous people of New Zealand, and includes a wide variety of folk music styles, often integrated with poetry and dance.

In addition to these traditions and musical heritage, since the 19th-century European colonization of New Zealand Māori musicians and performers have adopted and interpreted many of the imported Western musical styles. Contemporary rock and roll, soul, reggae, and hip hop all feature a variety of notable Māori performers."

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=372q8rAaVRA

 

https://folkcloud.com/folk-music-by-country/new-zealand

 

Australia - 

From Wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_music_of_Australia
"Indigenous music of Australia comprises the music of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of Australia, intersecting with their cultural and ceremonial observances, through the millennia of their individual and collective histories to the present day. The traditional forms include many aspects of performance and musical instrumentation that are unique to particular regions or Aboriginal Australian groups; and some elements of musical tradition are common or widespread through much of the Australian continent, and even beyond. The music of the Torres Strait Islanders is related to that of adjacent parts of New Guinea. Music is a vital part of Indigenous Australians' cultural maintenance.

In addition to these Indigenous traditions and musical heritage, ever since the 18th-century European colonization of Australia began, Indigenous Australian musicians and performers have adopted and interpreted many of the imported Western musical styles, often informed by and in combination with traditional instruments and sensibilities. Similarly, non-Indigenous artists and performers have adapted, used and sampled Indigenous Australian styles and instruments in their works. Contemporary musical styles such as rock and roll, country, rap, hip hop and reggae have all featured a variety of notable Indigenous Australian performers."

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyDv3oY5qkE

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAcH8TNkWOQ

 

https://folkcloud.com/folk-music-by-country/australia

 

Indonesia -

From Wikipedia .....    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Indonesia
"As it is a country with many different tribes and ethnic groups, the music of Indonesia (Indonesian: Musik Indonesia) itself is also very diverse, coming in hundreds of different forms and styles. Every region has its own culture and art, and as a result traditional music from area to area also uniquely differs from one another. For example, each traditional music are often accompanied by their very own dance and theatre. Contemporary music scene have also been heavily shaped by various foreign influences, such as America, Britain, Japan, Korea, and India.

The music of Java, Sumatra, Bali, Flores (Lesser Sunda Islands) and other islands have been well documented and recorded, and further research by Indonesian and international scholars is also ongoing. The music in Indonesia predates historical records, various Native Indonesian tribes often incorporate chants and songs accompanied with musical instruments in their rituals. The contemporary music of Indonesia today is also popular amongst neighbouring countries, such as Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei.

In general, traditional music and songs of Indonesia compromises a strong beat and harmony with strong influence from Indian, Java, Arabic, Chinese and Malay classical music. The influence is strongly visible in the popular traditional music genre of Dangdut."

 

https://www.holidify.com/pages/music-of-indonesia-2192.html

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MwDJR1iPuI

 

https://folkcloud.com/folk-music-by-country/indonesia
 

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We received an email from Silversea this morning.  This is what they did in 2016 and 2019 as well.

 

"We are thrilled that you will be joining us for our Far East-West 2024 World Cruise, an extraordinary journey that will broaden your horizons like never before.

Sailing aboard our beloved Silver Shadow, you’ll enjoy all the hallmarks of our signature luxury with one of the highest space-to-guest ratios at sea. Your time on board promises to be as enthralling as the destinations we will explore, as we aim to create the most personalised experience imaginable for you.

To that end, we ask that you please complete the form below so that we may customise a door plaque for your suite, provide you with complimentary business cards in your name, and collect your size for a jacket that you will receive as a gift.

To ensure we have these personalised items ready for your arrival, we ask that you submit the form no later than October 20, 2023.

Please be sure to also confirm the address to which you would like your complimentary travel journal sent.

Just one person per suite needs to complete the form below."

 

Looks like we will be getting jackets for this cruise.  Bonus!  We won't have to pack ours.  

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Next up on the music exploration tour .....

Singapore - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Singapore
According to Wikipedia:
"Singapore has a diverse music culture that ranges from rock and pop to folk and classical. Its various communities have their own distinct musical traditions: the Chinese form the largest ethnic group in Singapore, with Malays, Indians as well as a smaller number of other peoples of different ethnicities including Eurasians. The different people with their traditional forms of music, the various modern musical styles, and the fusion of different forms account for the musical diversity in the country.

It has an urban musical scene, and is a center for pop, rock, punk and other genres in the region. The country has produced in the 1960s bands like The Crescendos and The Quests, right up to the new millennium with pop singers such as Stefanie Sun and JJ Lin. Folk music of Singapore includes the ethnic music traditions of the Chinese, Malay and Tamil communities. Singapore also has a lively Western classical music scene."

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSe5IQSnO9s

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4NdorV6UAI

 

https://folkcloud.com/folk-music-by-country/singapore

 

Malaysia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Malaysia
According to Wikipedia:
"Music of Malaysia is the generic term for music that has been created in various genres in Malaysia. A great variety of genres in Malaysian music reflects the specific cultural groups within multiethnic Malaysian society: Malay, Chinese, Indian, Dayak, Kadazan-Dusun, Bajau, Orang Asli, Melanau, Kristang and others.

In general, music of Malaysia may be categorised as classical, folk, syncretic (or acculturated music), popular and contemporary art music. Classical and folk music emerged during the pre-colonial period and exists in the form of vocal, dance and theatrical music such as Nobat, Mak Yong, Mak Inang, Dikir barat, Ulek mayang and Menora. The syncretic music developed during the post-Portuguese period (16th century) and contains elements from both local music and foreign elements of Arabian, Persian, Indian, Chinese and Western musical and theatrical sources. Among genres of this music are Zapin, Ghazal, Mata-kantiga, Joget, Jikey, Boria and Bangsawan.

Both Malaysian popular music and contemporary art music are essentially Western-based music combined with some local elements. In 1950s, the musician P. Ramlee helped in creating a Malaysian music that combined folks songs with Western dance rhythms and western Asian music."

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUslFYyWP2Q

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zc6vS1uuOE4

 

https://folkcloud.com/folk-music-by-country/malaysia

 

Vietnam - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Vietnam
According to Wikipedia:
"Traditional Vietnamese music encompasses a large umbrella of Vietnamese music from antiquity to present times, and can also encompass multiple groups, such as those from Vietnam's ethnic minority tribes.

Royal Vietnamese court music first appeared in the congetiveness of europas after a successful seaborne raid against Champa led by emperor Lý Thái Tông in 1044. Cham women were taken as singers, dancers and entertainers for the court. The chronicles recorded that a special palace for Cham women was built in 1046, then in 1060 the emperor ordered a translation of Cham songs, and incorporated Cham drum known as trống cơm into the royal band. During the 13th century, a new trend of music came from China: songs set to Chinese tunes with Vietnamese lyrics.

Nhã nhạc is the most popular form of royal court music, specifically referring to the court music played from the Trần dynasty to the last Nguyễn dynasty of Vietnam, being synthesized and developed by the Nguyễn emperors. Influenced from Ming Chinese music, it slowly emerged in the royal court in the 1430s.  Along with nhã nhạc, the imperial court of Vietnam in the 19th century also had many royal dances which still exist in present times. The theme of most dances is to wish the emperor or empress longevity and the country prosperity.
Traditional orchestra performing at the Temple of Literature, Hanoi
Classical music is also performed in honour of gods and scholars such as to Confucius in temples and shrines. These categories are defined as Nhã Nhạc ("elegant music" or "ritual and ceremonial" music), Đại nhạc ("great music"), and Tiểu nhạc ("small music") are classified as chamber music, often for entertainment for the ruler.  In Vietnamese traditional dance, court dances were encompassed văn vũ (civil servant dance) and võ vũ (military dance)."

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BieMdOAZjsI

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3yOcxEsJZU

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxMszTA0Kko

 

https://folkcloud.com/folk-music-by-country/vietnam

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Next up on our magical music tour....

Hong Kong - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Hong_Kong#:~:text=Cantopop is one of the,Cantonese opera within Hong Kong.
According to Wikipedia:
"The Music of Hong Kong is an eclectic mixture of traditional and popular genres. Cantopop is one of the more prominent genres of music produced in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra and the Hong Kong Sinfonietta regularly perform western classical music in the city. There is also a long tradition of Cantonese opera within Hong Kong.

Cantonese opera - The art form is one of the first organised forms of entertainment in Hong Kong. The art form still exists today in its traditional format despite the changing trends in other industries. There is a debate about the origin(s) of Cantonese opera, but it is universally accepted that the predecessors of Cantonese opera originated from the northern part of China and slowly migrated to the southern province of Guangdong in late 13th century, during the late Southern Song Dynasty. Beginning in the 1950s, massive waves of immigrants fled Shanghai to destinations like North Point, boosting its fanbase.

Naamyam - Cantonese Naamyam is a unique narrative singing tradition in Cantonese dialect/language, different from Fujian Nan Yin. A singer would be engaged for a single performance or for regular performances over an extended period of time. Before the first half of the 20th century, naamyam sung by blind singers was a popular form of entertainment in Hong Kong and Canton. Common venues for performance included public places such as restaurants, teahouses, brothels, and opium dens, semi-public clubs and gathering places that catered to a particular trade or craft, such as butchers or rice merchants, and private households.

Cantopop - Prior to the development of popular music in the 1960s, Hong Kong's musical output was dominated by Cantonese opera and English pop. Prominent singers included Tang Kee-chan , Cheng Kuan-min . The godfather of Cantopop Roman Tam  made significant strides in the industry. The youth began to gravitate towards Cantonese pop in the 70s.

Around 1971, Sandra Lang was invited to sing the first Cantonese TV theme song, "The Yuanfen of a Wedding that Cries and Laughs". This song was the creation of the legendary songwriter Joseph Koo and the songwriter Yip Siu-dak. The genre was launched to unprecedented levels with virtually every TV drama using localised cantopop songs. Other notable pioneers for cantopop were Sam Hui, Jenny Tseng, Liza Wang and Paula Tsui."

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9MsS6w1ZEq0


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLZRYnmbjDM


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1XaW4joFVk

 

China - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_China
According to Wikipedia:
"Music of China refers to the music of the Chinese people, which may be the music of the Han Chinese in the course of Chinese history as well as ethnic minorities in today's China. It also includes music produced by people of Chinese origin in some territories outside mainland China using traditional Chinese instruments or in the Chinese language. It includes forms from the traditional and modern, Western inspired, commercial popular music, folk, art, and classical forms, and innovative combinations of them.

Documents and archaeological artifacts from early Chinese civilization show a well-developed musical culture as early as the Zhou dynasty (1122 BC – 256 BC) that set the tone for the continual development of Chinese musicology in following dynasties. These developed into a wide variety of forms through succeeding dynasties, producing the heritage that is part of the Chinese cultural landscape today. Traditional forms continued to evolve in the modern times, and over the course of the last centuries forms appropriated from the West have become widespread. Today's Chinese music is both rooted in history and part of a global culture."

According to legends, the founder of music in Chinese mythology was Ling Lun who, at the request of the Yellow Emperor to create a system of music, made bamboo pipes tuned to the sounds of birds including the phoenix. A twelve-tone musical system was created based on the pitches of the bamboo pipes, the first of these pipes produced the "yellow bell"  pitch, and a set of tuned bells were then created from the pipes."

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-Y4ncLy9LA


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMZrlB2-8SY


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jv9p8sr9m_s

 

Japan - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traditional_Japanese_music
According to Wikipedia:
"Traditional Japanese music is the folk or traditional music of Japan. Japan's Ministry of Education classifies hōgaku as a category separate from other traditional forms of music, such as gagaku (court music) or shōmyō (Buddhist chanting), but most ethnomusicologists view hōgaku, in a broad sense, as the form from which the others were derived. Outside of ethnomusicology, however, hōgaku usually refers to Japanese music from around the 17th to the mid-19th century. Within this framework, there are three types of traditional music in Japan: theatrical, court music, and instrumental."

Theatrical - Japan has several theatrical forms of drama in which music plays a significant role. The main forms are kabuki and Noh.

Court music (gagaku) - Gagaku is court music, and is the oldest traditional music in Japan. It was usually patronized by the Imperial Court or the shrines and temples. Gagaku music includes songs, dances, and a mixture of other Asian music. Gagaku has two styles; these are instrumental music kigaku  and vocal music seigaku.

Shōmyō - Shōmyō is a kind of Buddhist chanting of sutra syllabically or melismatically set to melodic phrasing, usually performed by a male chorus. Shōmyō came from India, and it began in Japan in the Nara period. Shōmyō is sung a capella by one or more Buddhist monks.

Jōruri - Jōruri  is narrative music using the shamisen. There are four main jōruri styles. These are centuries-old traditions which continue today."

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzp6dmjz_Fo


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6WJIDCuHus


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wCgmXlDBwg


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4V5dO9_hW-Y

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Now moving to the traditional music of :

Alaska - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Alaska

According to Wikipedia:
"Alaska's original music belongs to the Inupiaq, Aleut, Tlingit, and other Alaska Native communities. Russian, English and Irish immigrants brought their own varieties of folk music. Alaska was home to some of the United States' renowned performers, such as the singer Jewel (who had two No. 2 Hot 100 hits, including "You Were Meant for Me" and "Foolish Games"), and Hobo Jim, who was legislatively declared "Alaska's state balladeer". Traditional Aleut flautist Mary Youngblood, singer-songwriter Libby Roderick, the traditional performing group Pamyua, and performing artist Karrie Pavish Anderson also identify as Alaskan. Alaska also has a prominent metal and rock scene. Metalcore band 36 Crazyfists originated in Alaska, as did indie rock bands Portugal. The Man and The Builders and the Butchers."

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwzZwaqF_Fc

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWP6DwyLpl4

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=38ek4RFSUr0

 

Canada - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Canadian_cultures
According to Wikipedia:
"Music of Canadian Cultures is a wide and diverse accumulation of music from many different individual communities all across Canada. With Canada being vast in size, the country throughout its history has had regional music scenes. The music of Canada has reflected the multi-cultural influences that have shaped the country. First Nations people, the French, the British, the United States and many others nationalities have all made unique contributions to the musical heritage of Canada.

First Nations - Traditionally, First Nations, being resourceful and creative, used the materials at hand to make their instruments for centuries before Europeans immigrated to Canada. First Nations people made gourds and animal horns into rattles, many rattles were elaborately carved and beautifully painted. In woodland areas, they made horns of birchbark and drumsticks of carved antlers and wood. Drums were generally made of carved wood and animal hides. Drums and rattles are percussion instruments traditionally used by First Nations people. These musical instruments provide the background for songs, and songs are the background for dances. Many traditional First Nations people consider song and dance to be sacred. For many years after Europeans came to Canada, First Nations people were forbidden to practice their ceremonies.

Inuit music - Approximately 25,000 Inuit live in Northern Canada, primarily spread across Nunavut, the Northwest Territories, and Nunavik (northern Quebec). Prior to European contact, Inuit music was based around drums but has since grown to include fiddles and accordions. Music was dance-oriented and requested luck in hunting, gambling, or weather, and only rarely, if ever, expressing traditional purposes like love or specialized forms like work songs and lullabies. In the 20th century, Inuit music was influenced by Scottish and Irish sailors, as well as, most influentially, American country music. 

Katajjaq, or "Inuit throat singing", has become well known as a curiosity. In this traditional singing style, female singers produce melodies from deep in their throats.[citation needed] A pair of singers stare at each other in a sort of contest. Common in Northern Quebec and Baffin Island, katajjaq singers perform in sync with each other, so that one is producing a strong accent while the other is producing a weak one. The contest ends when one singer begins laughing, runs out of breath or the pair's voices become simultaneous. To some extent, young Inuit have revitalized the genre, and musicians like Tudjaat have even incorporated pop structures.

French-Canadian music - French settlers brought music with them when inhabiting what is now Quebec and other areas throughout Canada. Since the arrival of French music in Canada, there has been much intermixing with the Celtic music of Anglo-Canada. French-Canadian folk music is generally performed to accompany dances like the jig, jeux dansé, ronde, cotillion, and quadrille. The fiddle is a very common instrument, played by virtuosos like Jean Carignan, Jos Bouchard, and Joseph Allard. Other instruments include the German diatonic accordion, played by the likes of Philippe Bruneau and Alfred Montmarquette, spoons, bones, and jaw harps.

Maritime music - The traditional genre is heavily influenced by the music brought to the region by the European settlers, the most well known of which are the Scots & Irish Celtic and Acadian traditions. Folk songs are those passed on orally, usually composed by unknown persons. In the Maritime Provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island), sea shanties are widespread among the whaling and fishing workers. The most well known of these is Farewell to Nova Scotia. The lumber camps of New Brunswick have also produced their own body of folk songs. Irish and Scottish settlers in the eastern provinces of Canada brought traditions of fiddling and other forms of music. Having declined in popularity during the 20th century, a revival of Maritime traditional inspired music began in the late 1970s, led by artists such as John Allan Cameron and Stan Rogers and later, The Rankins, Mary Jane Lamond, Natalie MacMaster, Ashley MacIsaac, Barra MacNeils, and Barachois."

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=755HZydxL3w

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwhrofoOzMc

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGO258OxXBE

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5MaYWQgreQ

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At the risk of being repetitive, we are so impressed with Silversea's outreach!  We had a phone call today just to say they look forward to welcoming us and to see if we had any questions.  Were told luggage instructions would arrive around Thanksgiving for shipment around Christmas time.  They also assured us that Flavio would be on for the entire world cruise.  It is always great to have continuity on such a long voyage.  Calling was a lovely gesture and this lovely welcome made us feel as though Silversea is happy to have us on the cruise. 

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20 minutes ago, profpeabody said:

At the risk of being repetitive, we are so impressed with Silversea's outreach!  We had a phone call today just to say they look forward to welcoming us and to see if we had any questions.  Were told luggage instructions would arrive around Thanksgiving for shipment around Christmas time.  They also assured us that Flavio would be on for the entire world cruise.  It is always great to have continuity on such a long voyage.  Calling was a lovely gesture and this lovely welcome made us feel as though Silversea is happy to have us on the cruise. 

 

Very happy to hear that you are feeling welcomed before you even board the Silver Shadow.  The call was definitely a great way to connect.  

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Yesterday we received an email from Silversea presenting the lineup for our upcoming adventure.....

 

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Myster and I have sailed with Gilbert Lanza on previous World Cruises and really enjoyed it.  The rest of the lineup will be new to us.  

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