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A Silver Shadow Over The World - December 2023 to May 2024


mysty
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Sam Lord's Castle was a Hilton resort back in 1983 when we honeymooned next door at Crane Beach!  Other than the historic "castle" building, it looks entirely new, so it must have closed and completely updated.  It does look fantastic.  Be careful of the beach - the sand is like talcum powder but the water can be treacherous.  

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13 minutes ago, dawntrdr said:

Sam Lord's Castle was a Hilton resort back in 1983 when we honeymooned next door at Crane Beach!  Other than the historic "castle" building, it looks entirely new, so it must have closed and completely updated.  It does look fantastic.  Be careful of the beach - the sand is like talcum powder but the water can be treacherous.  

 

Apparently Sam Lord's Castle had a huge fire in the early 2000s and was rebuilt.  It isn't open yet.  Scheduled to open September 30th.   It's all-inclusive which was a surprise.   Thank you for the warning about the beach!

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1 minute ago, Stumblefoot said:

I’ll be interested in reading your POV after staying there.  Hopefully they run it better than their timeshares in our state.

 

I'll definitely report back.  It does look too good to be true. 🤨

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My curiosity was piqued about Sam Lord's Castle.  I went in search of the history and the fire.

 

https://nextstopbarbados.com/sam-lords-castle-barbados/#:~:text=About Sam Lord's Castle History,architecture throughout the historic property.

 

"Located on the cliffs in the southern part of the island, you can find the fascinating Sam Lord’s Castle in St. Philip Barbados. Sam Lord’s Castle Barbados is a must-see attraction on the island for history buffs and beach-lovers alike!

 

Who was Sam Lord?
Sam Lord was a well known known Buccaneer from Barbados who lived in the late 1700s – mid 1800s. He is most famous for the bizarre way in which he plundered ships.

According to legends, Sam Lord would hang lanterns around his property to trick ships into thinking they were approaching Bridgetown. They would crash on the reef and he would then steal any valuables they had on board.

 

About Sam Lord’s Castle History
Sam Lord’s castle was built in 1820. The beachfront mansion was his home and the place where he stored the riches he allegedly plundered.

Years later, the estate was turned into a hotel. Guests remember antique furniture and stunning architecture throughout the historic property. Unfortunately, the hotel burned down in 2010 and Sam Lord’s castle has mostly fallen to ruin. That said, but you can still get a clear picture of how impressive this home must have been.

 

And the fire...http://.https://www.nationnews.com/2010/10/20/fire-at-sam-lords-castle/

Article by Carol Martindale 
"PEOPLE WATCHED IN awe, despair, disgust and a slew of other emotions as historic Sam Lords Castle burned this evening.
Spectators from the surrounding area gathered to watch fire officials unsuccessfully battle the blaze which consumed the once stately building.
Shareholder, Thomas Grant, called it a “disgrace”.
“It is a disgrace to see the building left this way and now it has gone up in smoke,” he said.
Grant said most of the buildings had already been destroyed by CLICO, who were in the process of acquiring the property, and the castle section was one of the few buildings left.
Divisional Officer, Tyrone Trotman, said one of the problems they faced was a lack of nearby fire hydrants so they had to collect water from hydrants in the surrounding area and bring it to the combined ladder platform appliance for distribution.
As the evening wore on, the fire continued to burn, when asked, Trotman said he had little hope of saving the building."

 

5e97f5184a01084bd329f500181289ad.jpg.e8f8c6343624bb43c5368d4815071f4f.jpg

Edited by mysty
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For the segment from Hong Kong to Tokyo - Hong Kong  I would like to request Curry Fishballs. I found this recipe.

 

https://www.nomss.com/hong-kong-curry-fish-balls/

 

"Hong Kong Curry Fish Balls 港式咖哩魚蛋 (街頭小食) is a classic street food snack served with an addictive spicy curry sauce that is bold, fiery, and aromatic. Fried fish balls are typically served on wooden skewers with daikon and pork skin.

Hong Kong street foods are delicious and iconic in areas like Mong Kok, Causeway Bay, and Kwun Tong. The Asian street food style is second to none and is characterized by its ready-to-eat snacks and drinks. Although street vendors (小販 Xiǎofàn) have a long history from dynastic China, Hong Kong-style curry fish balls started selling on mobile food carts in the 1950s.

 

HK Chinese Curry Sauce vs Other Types of Curries
Chinese curry sauces are much different from Indian curry, which consists of saturated fats or ghee (goat milk butter). Indian curry is thicker, pungent and often contains yogurt and heavy cream.

Thai Curry: Thai curries have a thinner consistency, are brightly flavoured with fresh herbs and is lighter tasting flavour profile.

Malaysian Curry: Malaysian-style curry combines Indian and British preferences dating back to 15th Century Colonization. Sweet and savoury notes dominate Malaysian curry powder, while chili peppers, galangal, and ginger add heat and are smoothed out by adding coconut milk or Belacan (fermented shrimp paste).

Hong Kong Curry - Similar to Malaysian curries, Hong Kong curries are tailored to the Cantonese palate. 

Chinese curries are thick and delicious! The bold, fragrant, fiery melting pot of rich red and yellow curry sauces packs a spicier and darker punch. 

The unbeatable signature curry mixture is elevated by a secret ingredient: Douban sauce (Chilli Bean Sauce là dòubàn jiàng, 辣豆瓣酱).

 

Hong Kong Curry Fish Balls 港式咖哩魚蛋 (街頭小食)

Author: Nancy Prep Time: 10
Cook Time: 10 Total Time: 20 minutes
Yield: 2-4 persons 

 

INGREDIENTS

1 lbs Fried Fish Balls
3 Shallots, finely chopped
8 Cloves of Garlic, minced
2 tbsp Green Peppercorn Oil or Homemade Fragrant Oil or Vegetable Oil

Homemade HK Curry Sauce Base
1 tbsp Sacha Sauce 沙茶酱
1 tbsp Satay Sauce 沙爹酱
1 tsp Douban Sauce 辣豆瓣酱
1 tsp Chu Hou Paste 柱侯酱
1 tsp Tumeric Powder

Other Seasoning
3 tbsp Shaoxing Cooking Wine 紹興酒
1 tbsp Oyster Sauce 蚝油
1 tsp Light Soy Sauce 生抽
1 tsp Dark Soy Sauce 老抽
1 tbsp Brown Sugar
250 ml Chicken Stock or Chicken Essence Powder mixed with water
1 tsp Curry Powder (optional)
1 tsp Chilli Powder (optional)


INSTRUCTIONS
1. In a small bowl, prepare the curry paste base.
2. Add Sacha sauce, Douban sauce, curry paste, Chuhou sauce, and Satay sauce. Mix well and combine. Set aside.
3. Add cooking oil or homemade green peppercorn fragrant oil to a non-stick pan or wok. Heat oil over low-medium heat.
4. Add minced garlic and finely chopped shallots to the hot pan. Saute and simmer until they start to get fragrant. Stir frequent and avoid burning. Bring the heat down if it starts to brown too quickly.
5. Add the curry paste base to the caramelized shallots and garlic in the wok. Set to low heat. Frequently stir and push the paste
around for a few minutes. Have a dose of patience when frying up curry sauce so that it does not burn. It is essential to take your time with this step.
6. Turn the heat up to medium-high heat.
7. To enhance the flavour, add Shaoxing cooking wine around the perimeter of the wok to deglaze the wok. Allow it to vapourize
briefly.
8. Add chicken stock to the wok. Bring to a boil.
9. Add seasoning to the curry sauce by adding oyster sauce, light soy sauce, and dark soy sauce for colour. Bring to a boil and let it steep for a few minutes.
10. Add two tablespoons of brown sugar to the wok.
11. Bring to a boil, stir fry and push the paste around to combine. Avoid burning.
12. Now we can tighten the sauce. Slowly add a cornstarch slurry (dissolved corn starch with a little water) to the curry mixture while stirring frequently.
13. Refrain from over-reducing the sauce. You want to save some sauce for your white rice or for another meal like curried beef
briskets!
14. Bring the sauce back to a boil. Ensure that the curry sauce is thoroughly cooked, or it will flop, separate and break apart.
15. Turn off the heat and let it steep for 2-3 minutes.
16. In a large pot, cook fried fish balls in salted water according to packaged instructions.
17. Refrain from boiling the fried fish balls in high heat. Chinese fish balls lose their tender texture and become less bouncy!
18. Pierce cooked four to five fish balls with a bamboo skewer.
19. Evenly coat each fish ball skewer with curry sauce.
20. Enjoy hot.

 

NOTES
Homemade curry sauce can be stored in an air-tight container or mason jar for up to five days in the refrigerator.
 

HONG-KONG-CURRY-FISH-BALLS-RECIPES-NOMSS-1.jpg.ed2897d6cb11d9c6ce4d2c7d592ab30a.jpg

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Inquiring minds. 

 

Doubanjiang (Chinese: 豆瓣酱, pinyin: dòubànjiàng, IPA: [tôʊpântɕjâŋ]), also known as douban, toban-djan, broad bean chili sauce, or fermented chili bean paste, is a hot and savoury Chinese bean paste made from fermented broad beans, chili peppers, soybeans, salt and flour.

 

Chee Hou Sauce (zhù hóu jiàng, 柱侯酱), also sometimes called “chu hou paste,” is a fermented soybean sauce similar to Hoisin sauce but with a different mix of seasonings, including more unusual ingredients like salted plums, salted lemons and fermented bean curd (though ingredients vary by brand).

 

Shacha Sauce (shāchá jiàng, 沙茶酱) is a Chinese condiment made from oil, garlic, shallots, chilies, and seafood (usually brill fish and dried shrimp). It has an intensely savory, mildly seafood-y flavor.

 

 

Amazon here I come.

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2 minutes ago, highplanesdrifters said:

Inquiring minds. 

 

Doubanjiang (Chinese: 豆瓣酱, pinyin: dòubànjiàng, IPA: [tôʊpântɕjâŋ]), also known as douban, toban-djan, broad bean chili sauce, or fermented chili bean paste, is a hot and savoury Chinese bean paste made from fermented broad beans, chili peppers, soybeans, salt and flour.

 

Chee Hou Sauce (zhù hóu jiàng, 柱侯酱), also sometimes called “chu hou paste,” is a fermented soybean sauce similar to Hoisin sauce but with a different mix of seasonings, including more unusual ingredients like salted plums, salted lemons and fermented bean curd (though ingredients vary by brand).

 

Shacha Sauce (shāchá jiàng, 沙茶酱) is a Chinese condiment made from oil, garlic, shallots, chilies, and seafood (usually brill fish and dried shrimp). It has an intensely savory, mildly seafood-y flavor.

 

 

Amazon here I come.

 

You go @highplanesdrifters !  😁  Should you attempt to cook with these exotic ingredients, kindly provide your assessments.  😁  We wait with bated breath!

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On 8/23/2023 at 6:02 AM, mysty said:

 

Excellent question @rojaan19 !  It is not heavy.  The balls are wooden.  

Hi Mysty, love that necklace🙂 wow, had no idea those were wood. They look like some sort earthy gemstone.

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15 minutes ago, Lois R said:

Hi Mysty, love that necklace🙂 wow, had no idea those were wood. They look like some sort earthy gemstone.

 

The wooden balls are wrapped in the silk that forms the back of the neck part of the necklace.   It makes the wooden balls look like they're marbled.   It is the silk wrap that creates that effect. 

 

IMG_0128.JPG.0935ed07eae8a48f54655c9ef6244d3c.JPG

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1 hour ago, mysty said:

 

The wooden balls are wrapped in the silk that forms the back of the neck part of the necklace.   It makes the wooden balls look like they're marbled.   It is the silk wrap that creates that effect. 

 

IMG_0128.JPG.0935ed07eae8a48f54655c9ef6244d3c.JPG

Beautiful!!!! And thank you for explanation. How interesting too.

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Mysty, why bother with the ship's galley?  Just go to one of the many street markets in HK for curry fish balls!  Available all over HK, they are going to be more authentic than whatever the galley tries to whip up.  Plus, on the street fish balls are cheap and freshly deep fried in front of you.

 

Have you had stinky tofu?  That's another local tasty treat available at HK street markets day and night.  It doesn't stink and its delicious.  Push through the salivating crowds, then gobble down using a small toothpick.  I realize you don't like heat but I douse them with sambal or siracha on the counter.

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9 minutes ago, wristband said:

Mysty, why bother with the ship's galley?  Just go to one of the many street markets in HK for curry fish balls!  Available all over HK, they are going to be more authentic than whatever the galley tries to whip up.  Plus, on the street fish balls are cheap and freshly deep fried in front of you.

 

Have you had stinky tofu?  That's another local tasty treat available at HK street markets day and night.  It doesn't stink and its delicious.  Push through the salivating crowds, then gobble down using a small toothpick.  I realize you don't like heat but I douse them with sambal or siracha on the counter.

 

Thank you @wristband !  I appreciate your suggestions.  We haven't had stinky tofu.   We'll see how this rolls! 😁

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Highplainsdrifter, may I recommend you try the vinegar Oyster Sauce, the very one with a colorful label showing a Chinese lady & lad grinning ear to ear in a small boat. MMMM mmmm good!

 

"Spicy Hot Chili Sauce" clearly noted as "Crunchy" (says so on the label) is not a favorite of mine.  Textures of chili paste with that weird crunch is off putting on lo mein or chow foon.  I really like heat you get from adding a hot sauce - a Olek Sambal say - but that Capt. Crunch aspect is no go for me.  Label has a lady in a white apron looking dazed & confused.

 

You probably have noticed Gochujang paste (more Korean than Chinese) hyped these days, widely available in supermarkets and Amazon.  Its a fermented soy bean paste which you can marinate meats in or toss into a prepared dish.  Ugh. Not to my liking - that soy bean flavor is uber intense.

 

 

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2 hours ago, wristband said:

Mysty, why bother with the ship's galley?  Just go to one of the many street markets in HK for curry fish balls!  Available all over HK, they are going to be more authentic than whatever the galley tries to whip up.  Plus, on the street fish balls are cheap and freshly deep fried in front of you.

 

Have you had stinky tofu?  That's another local tasty treat available at HK street markets day and night.  It doesn't stink and its delicious.  Push through the salivating crowds, then gobble down using a small toothpick.  I realize you don't like heat but I douse them with sambal or siracha on the counter.

 

@wristband , I think I need to give a little context for my special meals plan.  I know I can easily find the "for real" versions of these dishes.  That is not why I am approaching it this way.  Each of the chefs that have prepared special meals for us on other cruises have been recognized with a personal thank you note and a glowing acknowledgement on the cruise surveys.  This gives "unrecognized" chefs in the galley recognition that they may not otherwise receive.   If the dish falls short in terms of authenticity I don't care.  It will give people in the galley a chance to shine.  😁

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For the segment from Tokyo to Seward (Anchorage, Alaska) - Japan  I would like to request Tonkatsu.  I found this recipe.

 

https://drivemehungry.com/tonkatsu-pork-katsu/   Published: Nov 16, 2022 by Jamie 

 

"Tonkatsu is a delicious Japanese dish made of juicy, tender pork coated in crispy panko breadcrumbs and fried until golden brown. It's served with a sweet and tangy tonkatsu sauce that's the perfect complement to this pork katsu. Read my tips on how to make this the best tonkatsu with the crispiest panko breadcrumb coating you'll find!"

 

Extra Crispy Tonkatsu (Japanese Pork Katsu)

Capture.JPG.150cd326d8d1292b5ae21ead712a4524.JPG
 

Ingredients
2 slices boneless pork loins or pork chops pounded to ¾ inch thick; 5oz each
1 cup Japanese panko bread crumbs See Note 1
½ cup all-purpose flour
1 egg beaten
salt & pepper
vegetable oil for frying

 

Tonkatsu Sauce
4 tablespoons ketchup
2 ½ tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
⅛ teaspoon garlic and onion powder
1 ½ teaspoons sugar (optional)

 

Instructions
Make the Tonkatsu Sauce
1. Tonkatsu sauce: Combine the ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, and garlic & onion powder in a small bowl. Taste and add sugar if desired (start with less if you want a Bull-dog sauce copycat). Set it aside.
4 tablespoons ketchup,2 ½ tablespoons Worcestershire sauce,1 tablespoon soy sauce,⅛ teaspoon garlic and onion powder,1 ½ teaspoons sugar

 

Bread the Pork
1.  Prep the pork loins: Cut slits into the white connective tissue on the outer edge of each pork loin or pork chop. This prevents it from curling up as it cooks. Flatten each pork loin to about ¾ inch thickness.

2.  Dredge the pork loins: Add the egg, flour, and panko bread crumbs to separate bowls. For a crispier crust, mix a tablespoon of flour with the egg to create a thicker egg wash for more bread crumbs to adhere to.
Salt and pepper the pork, then coat it in flour and shake off the excess. Next, dip it into the beaten egg and then firmly press it into the panko bread crumbs for a thick, generous layer of breading. See Note 2 for a crispier crust.
1 cup Japanese panko bread crumbs,½ cup all-purpose flour,1 egg

 

Deep-fry the Pork Cutlets
1. Heat oil: In a large heavy-duty pot or fryer, add enough oil to deep fry the cutlets. Heat the oil to 340°F over medium heat to ensure the pork fully cooks without burning the bread crumbs.
If you don't have a thermometer, drop some bread crumbs into the oil. It's ready when it begins to sizzle.
2. Fry the pork cutlets: Gently place a pork cutlet into the oil and deep-fry for 5 to 6 minutes per side or until the pork is fully cooked and the panko coating is golden brown and crispy.
Use a skimmer to clean up loose breadcrumbs and try to keep the oil temperature at 340°F. Repeat with the remaining cutlets and work in batches to avoid lowering the oil temperature. See Note 3.

Serve: Slice the tonkatsu and serve with tonkatsu sauce, shredded cabbage, and rice. 

 

Notes
1.  Japanese panko bread crumbs -  I recommend this Japanese brand of panko for this recipe. It has a crispier texture with larger flakes, which is ideal for tonkatsu.
2.  For an extra crispy crust, press the pork cutlets into the panko bread crumbs one more time right before frying. Some of the bread crumbs will absorb the egg wash and become soggy, so cover any bare spots to ensure the pork is completely coated. This creates a thick, crispy layer of bread crumbs that not only creates more texture but also protects the pork from overcooking thereby making it tender and juicy.
3. Oil temperature - Adjust the heat depending on how light or dark the bread crumbs get while frying. Avoid overcrowding the fryer as that can cause a drop in oil temperature.

 

tonkatsu-recipe-japanese-breaded-and-deep-fried-pork-2031274-hero-01-31a9f4e17fc04eeba22dee6c0caf27b7.jpg.5366213487163743b3f0f84c2f63d3f3.jpg

 

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10 minutes ago, Port Power said:

I’m going to ask for this at Indochine next week (with a substitution of panko crumbs).  The chef has offered to make us off-menu dishes, so this might be the perfect challenge.  I hope so, as it sounds delicious.

 

That's awesome @Port Power !  I hope your wish will be granted and that you enjoy it!  Please report back if you have time.  And enjoy your cruise! 🥰

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For the last segment Seward (Anchorage, Alaska) to San Francisco (California) I would like to request  Alaska Dungeness Crab (Crab Cakes).  I found this recipe.

 

https://www.alaskaseafood.org/recipe/alaska-crab-cakes/

 

Alaska Crab Cakes - Recipe courtesy of Chef Maya Wilson, author of “Alaska from Scratch.”

 

"These crispy and quick Alaska crab cakes are the perfect treat to share with friends, make for a snack or serve as an appetizer for anytime from special to everyday occasions."

 

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Servings: Approx. 8 cakes
Yield: Approx. 8 cakes

 

Ingredients
¼ cup mayonnaise
1 egg, beaten
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon lemon zest
½ teaspoon Old Bay seasoning
½ teaspoon black pepper
1 pound Alaska king, snow or Dungeness crab meat
2 tablespoons red bell pepper, finely diced
2 tablespoons celery, finely diced
2 tablespoons flat leaf parsley, finely chopped
⅔ cup panko
Cooking oil, for pan frying

For serving
Lemon wedges
Chipotle mayo, Sriracha aioli, or tartar sauce
Sliced scallions or chives

 

Preparation
Step 1
Make the crab cakes
To a mixing bowl, add the mayonnaise, egg, Worcestershire, Djion, lemon zest, Old Bay seasoning, and pepper. Stir to combine. Add the crab, bell pepper, celery, parsley, and panko. Fold together to combine. Using your hands, form the mixture into 8 patties.

Step 2
Fry the crab cakes
Coat a skillet with cooking oil and heat over medium-high. When the oil is hot and shimmering, add the patties to the pan. Cook until crispy and browned on both sides, about 3 minutes per side.

Step 3
Plate and serve
Serve with lemon and dipping sauce of choice. Sprinkle with scallions or chives to serve.

 

image0-4-crop-1636670806-3365x1969.jpeg.d4a42bf3574f4d6edebddaffcbd5bdd3.jpeg

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On 9/22/2023 at 2:04 PM, wristband said:

Highplainsdrifter, may I recommend you try the vinegar Oyster Sauce, the very one with a colorful label showing a Chinese lady & lad grinning ear to ear in a small boat. MMMM mmmm good!

 

"Spicy Hot Chili Sauce" clearly noted as "Crunchy" (says so on the label) is not a favorite of mine.  Textures of chili paste with that weird crunch is off putting on lo mein or chow foon.  I really like heat you get from adding a hot sauce - a Olek Sambal say - but that Capt. Crunch aspect is no go for me.  Label has a lady in a white apron looking dazed & confused.

 

You probably have noticed Gochujang paste (more Korean than Chinese) hyped these days, widely available in supermarkets and Amazon.  Its a fermented soy bean paste which you can marinate meats in or toss into a prepared dish.  Ugh. Not to my liking - that soy bean flavor is uber intense.

 

 

Spicy kindred spirits! Sambal is my go to Asian kick. Thanks for all the tips! I like modified  Gochujang - Korean catsup. 😃  Agree on the Capt. Crunch and Vinegar Oyster sauce.

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There are currently rumblings about the remergence of the nasty that shut down our world.  This could have implications for our travel.  I found a resource that provides up-to-date information on the situation by country.  I intend to keep an eye on what is happening around our world.

 

https://www.traveloffpath.com/countries-without-any-travel-restrictions-or-entry-requirements/

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4 hours ago, mysty said:

There are currently rumblings about the remergence of the nasty that shut down our world.  This could have implications for our travel.  I found a resource that provides up-to-date information on the situation by country.  I intend to keep an eye on what is happening around our world.

 

https://www.traveloffpath.com/countries-without-any-travel-restrictions-or-entry-requirements/

Noooooooo!  Dont they know you're coming?

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Mysty, we were on Regent's 2023 World Cruise (yes, this year).  Despite being fully vaxed + all the  boosters we both got Covid at different times (Singapore then Mumbai) and were isolated. 

 

Paxlovid did the trick but we were put (separately) into isolation for six days each.  A good number of staff & passengers contracted Covid at different times during the five month cruise.  Management was tight lipped about numbers so who knows how many.  Gossip and the obvious facts (people missing from public view and attending to your cabin) filled the vaccum.

 

My point is Covid is everywhere all over the world and on board, even among those who exhibit no symptoms.  The best we can do is take precautions.  If you have an "underlying co-morbidity" take extra steps - social distancing and mask wearing. 

 

But who knows where we are vulnerable - the ship elevator, theater, lounge, tender or in port?

Purell and wiping surfaces with a sanitizer is not an antidote for the Airborne virus.

 

Personally, I accept the risk of being on a cruise ship for a long period in close proximity to staff and passenger.  I realize I bear the consequences - as we did just months ago - of Covid's reach.

 

 

 

 

 

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