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Any truth to this rumor?


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As I said when we were on the Royal Promenade, it was kind of a funny view to see everyone stray to the right.. and then to the left.. with the rocking of the boat. :D

 

The rocking was noticeable at times, but we never really hit rough seas, at all.

yes, but those under the influence of alcohol walked straight!!! :D

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As I said when we were on the Royal Promenade, it was kind of a funny view to see everyone stray to the right.. and then to the left.. with the rocking of the boat. :D

 

You also have to have an understanding of how these automatic stabilizers work. The stabilizers do not know to pitch prior to a wave. It isn't until the ship starts to roll that the stablizers pitch in order to right the ship. Without them, the rolling would be much worse. Also, the direction of wind and seas is a huge factor.

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Just got off the Independence of the Seas on Sunday and we had a very rocky trip going down to San Juan and I also wondered if he was using the stabilizers. The entire trip was definitely rocky. Some seasick. Met a poor lady who was on her first cruise and was wondering if it's always like that. We were at the service desk and another woman was telling the staff that she wanted to get OFF the ship at San Juan and go home. She never had such a rocky trip and wanted her money back!!! ( Like that would ever happen :rolleyes:) I took a Bonine myself which I haven't done in years. I have been on other ships where the captain did NOT use the stabilizers and you can tell the difference.

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I laugh everytime I hear someone complaning about a ship rocking. Duh, you are on a ship, in the ocean!!

 

No kidding! Stabilizers only assist in rough seas. They do not guarantee a smooth ride. Despite the size of todays ships, some people tend to forget how miniscule they are compared to the ocean.

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We were on the Independence and leaving Fort Lauderdale on 3/1/09 and the following sea day the ship was rocking pretty good. The sick bags were out around the ship and green apples were eveywhere, as well as green people. ;) I was told the Captain said the swells were 9 feet. The water did not look that rough to me, there were whitecaps but nothing that looked close to 9 feet. I did not expect to feel anything with the ship being as big as it is but I was surprised. We were going 20 knots (if that is the correct term) and the winds were maybe 50. So anyway, when I ready this thread I wondered if the stabilizers could have anything to do with all the motion we had. I usually do not pay much attention to the size of the waves and we normally do not feel much of anything on a cruise. Only once were we bouncing from one wall to another walking down the hallways and that was out worse experience and on a much smaller ship.

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AKS368 you were on the cruise right before ours. Interesting the Capt told us the same thing about 9 foot seas. Didn't really look all that bad to me either. I've been on over 40 cruises and have experienced many bad days and mostly good days. The trip on the Independence was such that you hit the walls on each side as you tried to walk down the hallway. I've cruised before stabilizers were popular. I think the stabilizers make a significant difference. Cruised on the Carnival Legend a couple of times several years ago. The captain at the time was notorious for not using the stabilizers. Also rocky each time.

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Perhaps you are on to something with the fuel savings. Rccl dropped our first port (San Juan) on our 10 night Explorer cruise from NJ to the caribbean. Instead we will have 3 sea days and then dock in St. Thomas.

 

I am disappointed we only have 4 ports at this point. I was hoping they would revamp the itinerary so we could have at least one more day on land. I love 2 consecutive sea days but that 3rd day makes me anxious to touch the sand.

 

Right now RCCL is doing something with our Jan 14 cruise so who knows what is happening.

 

Love reading CC to get the updates.

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At a time when the cruise lines stocks are in the toilet and they are cutting back on services, and nickle and diming you to death, don't you think they'd be interested in keeping fuel costs as low as possible? The stabilizers create drag, increasing fuel consumption.

 

I took a backstage a few years ago when fuel prices were below today's level. The production manager who gave the tour said THIS Captain was good about deploying the stabilizers during the production shows. That statement led me to believe that some Captains aren't. Either those Captains like the ship to rock them to sleep, or there is a bonus or other incentive to conserve fuel.

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Sailing last week on the Mariner, I believe the stabilizers were being used. A very smooth sailing it was. Or maybe the Pacific was as smooth as glass... :cool:

If the seas are''as smooth as glass'', ( happens frequently), stabilizers are not at all used; no need whatsoever for them

Cheers

:)

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It's true that stabilizers increase the drag which then requires increased RPM or propeller pitch to maintain speed. However there is an offsetting increase in propeller efficiency when stabilizers, (which will cut a 20 deg roll down to 2 deg) are in operation. Thus the added fuel costs are very small.

 

The ships officers do not contact the cruise director to keep him up to date as to when the stabilizers are in use, except during particular events such as the champagne waterfall when they will either give the go ahead or suggest a better time or day.

 

The wind has a very small direct affect on the ships motion, other than to cause it to heel, which is then corrected by shifting ballast. However a wind which blows from a constant direction will develop a 'swell' and these longer and deeper waves are what will cause a vessel to roll.

 

I've had passengers tell me they feel seasick - before we've even sailed.

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Last November/December on the Ruby at the Captains Cocktail party... during his speech the Captain made a comment that they were not using the stabilisers in order to conserve fuel!! due to the sea state being reasonable and the fact that they were in the Gulf stream which was carrying the ship along at 25 knots while they were using 3 of their 4 Engines.

 

So i guess that they do house the stabilisers at certain times in order to conserve fuel....:) and of course being in control of the ship it woul dhave been his decision.

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[quote name='Merion_Mom']And that should lay to rest this latest baseless rumor.

Thanks, Paul. :)[/quote]

You know Carol, no matter what you say, some people will not read all the posts and will still make up their own opinions. :rolleyes:

How does one prove that they are of an organization that regulates cruise ships?
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