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dorothyl

Destiny broke a propeller

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I have family on the Destiny. They were supposed to dock at 7 AM tomorrow morning in San Juan but are limping back because of a broken propeller and won't be in port until tomorrow night. My SIL and family have been told they will miss their flights and are being put up somewhere until new flights can be arranged. Anyone heading to the dock to board tomorrow morning will be disappointed.

 

How can they fix it in time for the next cruise to start? It will have to leave late, probably on Monday or can they get it done quicker? Anyone ever been in that postion?

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I don't think they can fix something like that without going into drydock.

Hopefully I'm wrong and it can be fixed fast without too much inconvenience to anybody.

 

Something like that happened to a NCL ship and it took them months to get it fixed. They cut out certain ports of calls because the ship couldn't go as fast.

 

Hopefully this is a quick fix.

 

Bill

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If it truly is a broken prop the only way to fix it is to go to drydock. Maybe it is an engine issue that they can fix without going into the dock.

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OMG, I hope it's a quick fix. We're scheduled to go in two weeks. When you are saying it has to go into dry dock to fix, are we talking days? or weeks? :confused:

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okay I just called Carnival and they said it was not a propeller it was the prolportion (sp?) and it has already been fixed and the ship will arrive in San Juan at 3pm tomorrow.

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The response from Carnival is interesting.

The last email from our family was the ship was moving very slow. They have been told on ship that they will be in tomorrow evening. As of 2 hours ago the problem was NOT fixed.

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Dorothyl

I dunno that is what Carnival told me. Let us know what you know since you have someone on the ship and could keep us posted if you don't mind.

Thanks:)

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Dorothyl

I dunno that is what Carnival told me. Let us know what you know since you have someone on the ship and could keep us posted if you don't mind.

Thanks:)

 

don't fret as CCL reps have very little knowledge of what is happening on the ships while they are cruising.

 

I believe if it goes into drydock it takes a bout 1-2 weeks. On the NCL ship that had a similar problem they had to order the part and wait for it to be delivered.

 

Don't put the cart before the horse. Wait until you find out what the problem is first before getting worried.:)

 

Bill

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The Destiny, as well as the Conquest class, uses six Sultzer diesel electric generators/alternators to supply 63,000 KW of power using ABB equipment to the ship at 6,600 Volts . The two synchronous ac motors propelling the ship are mounted within the hull and are rated at 20,000 KW each. The propellers spin at a constant speed, around 150 rpm, and have controlled pitch propellers. The higher the pitch, the more the props bite the ocean, and the faster the ship goes. Almost all the bearings are inside the hull, which can be replaced fairly quickly without a drydock, unlike ships using azipods.

 

If there were a problem with one of the diesels or generators, the Destiny would be slowed, but not to a crawl. If there were a problem with one of the propulsion motors, the ships speed would be slowed in half. If there were a problem with the props pitch controllers or mechanisms, the ship could be slowed to a crawl. Seaweed can foul the pitch mechanisms, which can be cleared by divers fairly quickly. A controller problem could be fixed by swapping circuit boards, or fixing the hydraulics. Without knowing the exact problem, it's difficult to predict how long it will take to repair. It could be a few hours to repair, or months for the replacement parts to be made, depending upon what is broken.

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In terms of ports, if the propeller is broken, is that St. Thomas will not be missed, since it is VERY close to SJU. However, dominica may be missed, since it is a long way away, but Barbados may not. After Barbados, I think aruba would me missed. Good luck.

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If not a broken propeller, then a blown generator or two would account for a slow speed.

 

If a screw is damage, they will shut that one down because the shaft could be bent and the other screw is currently in use, this could be the reason why its moving but moving at a slower rate.

 

Either way if its true that a shaft is bent then next weeks cruise is cancelled and the ship will need to head up to Drydock, they have spare Prop blades sitting by the bow by the anchor chains and that would be a quick fix, 3 days max but a bent shaft if its shaft driven, the reduction gears are also going to be replaced. your talking at lease 1 month in drydock. Good Luck all, hope its nothing serious.:confused:

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The Destiny, as well as the Conquest class, uses six Sultzer diesel electric generators/alternators to supply 63,000 KW of power using ABB equipment to the ship at 6,600 Volts . The two synchronous ac motors propelling the ship are mounted within the hull and are rated at 20,000 KW each. The propellers spin at a constant speed, around 150 rpm, and have controlled pitch propellers. The higher the pitch, the more the props bite the ocean, and the faster the ship goes. Almost all the bearings are inside the hull, which can be replaced fairly quickly without a drydock, unlike ships using azipods.

 

If there were a problem with one of the diesels or generators, the Destiny would be slowed, but not to a crawl. If there were a problem with one of the propulsion motors, the ships speed would be slowed in half. If there were a problem with the props pitch controllers or mechanisms, the ship could be slowed to a crawl. Seaweed can foul the pitch mechanisms, which can be cleared by divers fairly quickly. A controller problem could be fixed by swapping circuit boards, or fixing the hydraulics. Without knowing the exact problem, it's difficult to predict how long it will take to repair. It could be a few hours to repair, or months for the replacement parts to be made, depending upon what is broken.

 

What would we do without the Internet? Actually if one of the propulsion motors was gone, I would think it would slow down less than 50% - neglecting any compensation to keep the ship going in a straight line. Isn't horsepower vs speed one of them squared relationships ?

 

If Destiny can make it from Aruba to San Juan anytime on Sunday, it is moving faster than a crawl.

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I could, but have to keep mine reserved for any that complain about blue jeans in the dining room.

 

Since Destiny has three ports of embarkation/disembarkation, (where shorts would be allowed the first night), this could get interesting if they have to modify the schedule.

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Don't they have any duct tape? Couldn't the passengers loan them some?

 

Dan

 

 

No way Dan, they used the last piece of Duct tape to patch their other Prop:confused: Rumors are that the passengers are holding out on their Tape, They are saying they can get 150.00 a roll on ebay:eek:

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From conjr on Roll Call for 03/19/06:

 

"I called Carnival. Embarkation will not begin until 8:30 PM on Sunday now. They said to call back on Sunday and re-verify."

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