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We will be docked in Ashdod end of October for the day and would like advise on tours. We have been to Jerusalem before so are thinking either Masada and the Dead Sea or Jaffa. Or other suggestions welcome.

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We will be docked in Ashdod end of October for the day and would like advise on tours. We have been to Jerusalem before so are thinking either Masada and the Dead Sea or Jaffa. Or other suggestions welcome.

 

Masada and the Dead Sea is a great option if you didn't visit there.

Jaffa is also a great option too but totally different .

While for the Masada option you'll need to join a tour, Jaffa is one of those options that you can do independently, taking a taxi from the port, or even use the cruise shuttle service to Ashdod and take the bus, cheaper but yet I would have recommended the first option more.

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  • 3 months later...

What can we do in Haifa for a day on a Saturday(Shabbat) we were in Israel last year and spent a day in Haifa visiting the beautiful gardens there. Any suggestions\ for something different.Any food tours there?

Edited by wendyp247
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What can we do in Haifa for a day on a Saturday(Shabbat) we were in Israel last year and spent a day in Haifa visiting the beautiful gardens there. Any suggestions\ for something different.Any food tours there?

 

First of all, I recommend searching this thread for previous relevant posts.

 

There are museums close to the cruise ship terminal in Haifa. For example, the Haifa City Museum and the Haifa Museum of Art (http://www.hma.org.il/eng). I've recently been to both and enjoyed my visits.

 

I have enjoyed walking along the Bat Galim beach front, which is also withing walking distance, a few times. At the western end of Bat Galim, there are a couple of museums, but only one of them is open on Saturdays (Shabbat), The National Maritime Museum (also http://www.hma.org.il/eng), which I also recently visited and enjoyed.

 

There is a cable car that connects Bat Galim with the Stella Maris Monastery, which I have also visited and found interesting. Unfortunately, the cable car's official website (http://cablecar-haifa.co.il/) is only in Hebrew, but you should be able to find up-to-date information in English.

 

Trains won't be running until Shabbat ends, but some bus lines provide limited service throughout the day. I believe the Haifa Center Train Station (https://goo.gl/maps/jX9wXeVPHYp) is the closest bus stop to the cruise ship terminal.

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First of all, I recommend searching this thread for previous relevant posts.

 

 

 

There are museums close to the cruise ship terminal in Haifa. For example, the Haifa City Museum and the Haifa Museum of Art (http://www.hma.org.il/eng). I've recently been to both and enjoyed my visits.

 

 

 

I have enjoyed walking along the Bat Galim beach front, which is also withing walking distance, a few times. At the western end of Bat Galim, there are a couple of museums, but only one of them is open on Saturdays (Shabbat), The National Maritime Museum (also http://www.hma.org.il/eng), which I also recently visited and enjoyed.

 

 

 

There is a cable car that connects Bat Galim with the Stella Maris Monastery, which I have also visited and found interesting. Unfortunately, the cable car's official website (http://cablecar-haifa.co.il/) is only in Hebrew, but you should be able to find up-to-date information in English.

 

 

 

Trains won't be running until Shabbat ends, but some bus lines provide limited service throughout the day. I believe the Haifa Center Train Station (https://goo.gl/maps/jX9wXeVPHYp) is the closest bus stop to the cruise ship terminal.

 

 

 

Haifa is a great place to be on Saturday (Tel Aviv, too)

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  • 1 month later...

We are on a cruise that goes to Aqaba. Have been to Petra, Wadi and the Dead Sea. We would like to go to Eilat. Does anyone have any experience with crossing the border? Our ship will be in port for 12 hours, so time is not a problem.

Thank you

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Ruth,

We will be in Ashdod in October and the ship,leaves at 1400. There is a shuttle into Ashdod city. We would like to see Jaffa and wonder if it is feasible to DIY via a taxi or do you have other suggestions? Would we be better with a tour??We will have been to Bethlehem, Jerusalem, Masada and the Dead Sea. Thanks in advance for your help

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Hi Ruth,

We will be in Ashdod in October and the ship,leaves at 1400. There is a shuttle into Ashdod city. We would like to see Jaffa and wonder if it is feasible to DIY via a taxi or do you have other suggestions? Would we be better with a tour??We will have been to Bethlehem, Jerusalem, Masada and the Dead Sea. Thanks in advance for your help

 

I am not Ruth but will try to help anyway. A lot depends when you can disembark. Between 7-9 AM it could take you up to an hour to get to Jaffa. After that maybe a half hour or so.. You would probably have to leave at about 12 noon and the trip should take about a half hour depending on port traffic on road 42.

 

You could see Jaffa in that time but it would be a run and you will always be looking at your watch. My suggestion would be to consider the National Park in Ashkelon and the nearby Marina. It is a short, up to 30 minute drive, with no traffic as you are heading south not north.

 

There are antiquities, walking trails, a nearby beach, (probably no lifeguards at that time of year) and a large new marina with cafes etc. The official one way taxi fare is 112NIS or about $32. You could try to arrange for your driver stay with you to take you to the marina (it is about a 35 minute walk) and then back to Ashdod, or maybe just come back to return you to Ashdod

 

You can check it out on Google and see if you like it.

Edited by Ba' Datz
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Hi Ruth,

We will be in Ashdod in October and the ship,leaves at 1400. There is a shuttle into Ashdod city. We would like to see Jaffa and wonder if it is feasible to DIY via a taxi or do you have other suggestions? Would we be better with a tour??We will have been to Bethlehem, Jerusalem, Masada and the Dead Sea. Thanks in advance for your help

 

Not Ruth, nevertheless. ..

Your best option is a Taxi.

In the terminal there is a taxi dispatch with an official price list. Your price is to Tel Aviv.

Mind you it is one way and it will cost you around 80USD.

You'd better negotiate with the driver for the price waiting for you and take you back. It should be around 25USD for an hour of waiting.

Enjoy your visit.:cool::'):cool::cool::cool::cool:

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In the terminal there is a taxi dispatch with an official price list. Your price is to Tel Aviv.

Mind you it is one way and it will cost you around 80USD.

 

The OP said that there is a shuttle to the city. He could get a taxi there for a lot cheaper. Like I wrote the official rate is about $32

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The OP said that there is a shuttle to the city. He could get a taxi there for a lot cheaper. Like I wrote the official rate is about $32

 

I don't.know were you get you information.

The official price Ashdod-Tel Aviv is 68USD.

When taken from the port, it is a bit more.

The problem.is that only authorised taxis can take you all the way to.inside the port...

All the hassle of taking a shuttle to the city, finding a taxi and negotiating the price, and then do the same in Jaffa, and still have the issue of getting into the port... just doesn't worth it!

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I don't.know were you get you information.

...

I'm not a moderator, and I realize English might not be everyone's first language, but I still would like to see posts that are polite to each other. We are all simply trying to help each other.

 

Inter-city rates do not appear at and a point-to-point calculator is not available at the following government webpage (in Hebrew): https://www.gov.il/he/Departments/policies/price_list_and_taxi_rates. Only metered rates appear on that page.

 

However, https://taxitariff.co.il/ (also in Hebrew), provides a July 2018 government document with inter-city rates (https://taxitariff.co.il/%D7%A7%D7%95%D7%91%D7%A5%20%D7%94%D7%AA%D7%A7%D7%A0%D7%95%D7%AA-8034.pdf). According to page 13 of that document, tariff 1 - between 05:30-21:00 - for Ashdod to Tel Aviv (which also applies to Jaffa) is ILS 206.

 

That website also provides a calculator for point-to-rate metered rates. From the Port of Ashdod to the Port of Jaffa, that calculator says it should cost between ILS 159.6–173.4 on the meter (again, at tariff 1 between 05:30-21:00).

 

As someone previously mentioned and also as far as I can tell, only authorized taxis can enter the Port of Ashdod. If I am accurately understanding the relevant section of https://www.ashdodport.co.il/serviceslist/passengers/TourVessel/TourVesselMsg.pdf (in Hebrew), the following taxi companies are authorized to enter the port:

 

Sea Mall Taxis: *5533

HaLev Ashdod Taxis: 08-8022221

Ashdod Mall Taxis: *6868

HaIr Ashdod Taxis: 08-8669966

 

HTH

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  • 1 year later...

Hi there - we will be docking at Eilat this April 12, which is Easter and just a few days after Passover.  Excuse my lack of knowledge - I haven't visited Israel before - is this likely to have an impact? will everything be closed, or conversely, crazy-busy? Are there likely to be any special events that we might want to seek out? We are not thinking of going anywhere near Jerusalem which is very far away anyhow; hoping to organize a tour more locally, do some birding or perhaps go on a hike or to the beach.  appreciate any advice, thank you

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On 11/26/2019 at 11:32 PM, JTor said:

Hi there - we will be docking at Eilat this April 12, which is Easter and just a few days after Passover.  Excuse my lack of knowledge - I haven't visited Israel before - is this likely to have an impact? will everything be closed, or conversely, crazy-busy? Are there likely to be any special events that we might want to seek out? We are not thinking of going anywhere near Jerusalem which is very far away anyhow; hoping to organize a tour more locally, do some birding or perhaps go on a hike or to the beach.  appreciate any advice, thank you

A few items regarding Passover in Israel:

 

  • The evening before the first day, the first day (until sunset), the evening before the seventh day, and the seventh day (until sunset) are national holidays. As such, (almost all) public transportation does not operate. Kosher restaurants and many supermarket chains are closed. In 2020, that would be Wednesday evening, April 8; Thursday, April 9; Tuesday evening, April 14; and Wednesday, April 15. So, this does not affect your particular visit.
  • During Passover, many restaurants, hotels, and stores do not serve or sell anything leavened - even if they are not kosher (but bread and so on can be found). Most bakeries are closed.
  • The days between the two Passover holidays are also holidays, albeit minor ones. Schools are out and it is a vacation period for Israelis. As such, I believe Eilat will be pretty packed on April 12, and to a lesser extent Aqaba, Petra, Taba, and maybe other parts of the Sinai as well. In any case, for a one-day cruise ship visit, I would recommend against crossing the border, unless you are on a organized tour.

I think going to the Eilat bird watching center is a great idea. Or, you could go to the slightly less-popular beaches such as Coral/Almog Beach or Dolphin Beach, south of the Eilat port, away from the city center.

If I think of any other possible issues, I'll let you know.

Edited by jlajr
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Hi,

we will be in Haifa, Wednesday 14 October 2020 6am - 7pm. On a cruise ship.  We would like to spend the day in Haifa (maybe with a guide).  Have thought about visiting the Baha’i Gardens, Clandestine Musuem & other sights in the City,

 

what are your recommendations?

 

Gillian.

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Hi,

 

Wonder whether you can help, please.

 

Sailing next week, very last-minute late-booked cruise. Ship will be berthed in Ashdod overnight, with two full days.

We''ve been to Jerusalem, Ein Gedi and Herod's fortress at Masada before, and the Sea of Galilee etc from Haifa,  (brilliant, I'd recommend all for a first-timer in Israel), so we're looking at striking out on a circular drive in a rented car and overnighting ashore.

We know that we can't take the car out of the country or into Palestinian-controlled territory but having difficulty figuring out those borders.

Here's our planned route

https://goo.gl/maps/ZvLiMwBsFPP3hV6D9

(yes, we know it's not the quickest :classic_rolleyes:, but apart from wanting to visit the crusader castle at Acre we drive more for the journey than the destination, hence the route up the coast and totally avoiding the main Hwy 6  :classic_smile:)

 

Main query is, does that route steer clear of areas that are no-go for a rented car?

And is it tolerably interesting or scenic?

 

But a few others if you can oblige....

Googlemaps shows the coast to be as quick as Hwy 6. But googlemaps doesn't always get it right - if it's congested or massively slower perhaps we should reconsider ?

When we get close to Jerusalem, depending on time & weather, we'll consider re-visiting the Dead Sea or Jerusalem or simply head straight back to the ship. Our planned route again avoids Hwy 6, mainly to avoid grief with tolls in a rented car Or are there tollbooths where we can pay?  (we're aware that if we use the Carmel tunnel at Haifa there's a "cash" lane) 

 

I do my best to help out on these boards.

Now I'm looking for help myself.

 

TIA

 

JB :classic_smile:

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, John Bull said:

Hi,

 

Wonder whether you can help, please.

 

Sailing next week, very last-minute late-booked cruise. Ship will be berthed in Ashdod overnight, with two full days.

We''ve been to Jerusalem, Ein Gedi and Herod's fortress at Masada before, and the Sea of Galilee etc from Haifa,  (brilliant, I'd recommend all for a first-timer in Israel), so we're looking at striking out on a circular drive in a rented car and overnighting ashore.

We know that we can't take the car out of the country or into Palestinian-controlled territory but having difficulty figuring out those borders.

Here's our planned route

https://goo.gl/maps/ZvLiMwBsFPP3hV6D9

(yes, we know it's not the quickest :classic_rolleyes:, but apart from wanting to visit the crusader castle at Acre we drive more for the journey than the destination, hence the route up the coast and totally avoiding the main Hwy 6  :classic_smile:)

 

Main query is, does that route steer clear of areas that are no-go for a rented car?

And is it tolerably interesting or scenic?

 

But a few others if you can oblige....

Googlemaps shows the coast to be as quick as Hwy 6. But googlemaps doesn't always get it right - if it's congested or massively slower perhaps we should reconsider ?

When we get close to Jerusalem, depending on time & weather, we'll consider re-visiting the Dead Sea or Jerusalem or simply head straight back to the ship. Our planned route again avoids Hwy 6, mainly to avoid grief with tolls in a rented car Or are there tollbooths where we can pay?  (we're aware that if we use the Carmel tunnel at Haifa there's a "cash" lane) 

 

I do my best to help out on these boards.

Now I'm looking for help myself.

 

TIA

 

JB :classic_smile:

 

 

 

If you look on your map you will see a dotted black line, which is the green line. You are nowhere near it. Personally, on my last 3 trips not including the one I’m currently on I have never taken route 6. If I remember correctly route 2 which goes closer to the sea is somewhat faster than route 4 which is a little further inland. However, off route 4 a bit north of Atlit (on Route 2) if you take 7111 up onto the Carmel range you will find the artist village of Ein Hod which I enjoy. Lots of artist’s studios and galleries to visit. 
 

Also, there is some fantastic Bauhaus architecture in Tel Aviv which I am currently enjoying. 

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On 11/28/2019 at 10:24 PM, gnome12 said:

If you look on your map you will see a dotted black line, which is the green line. You are nowhere near it.

I disagree. The map shows you driving south from Beit She'an toward Jericho and then west into Jerusalem. Without getting into a whole geopolitical discussion, those roads and highways are on what was the Jordanian side of the Green Line. If you don't go into Jericho itself and follow the roads and highways that are under Israeli control, you might not have any issues with a rental car - but I'm not sure. I recommend checking with the rental car company whether you are allowed to drive on Highway 90 from Beit She'an to the Dead Sea and on Highway 1 from the Dead Sea to Jerusalem.

 

I don't think you would be able to pick up a rental car - I don't think there are any companies right at the Ashdod port - and then drive that entire route in one day. Highways 20 (aka the Ayalon) and 2 along the coast are limited access highways, but they usually have a lot of traffic throughout the day in at least one direction. Highway 4 is technically not a limited access highway, but there aren't any traffic lights on it from Rishon Lezion until Ramat Hasharon. In any case, it also has a lot of traffic on it in at least direction throughout the day. Highway 6 is probably the fastest way north, but it also is usually backed up at a number of places depending on the time of day. Also, I agree, you might have an issue with the toll. Finally, Highway 85 is not a limited-access highway and can be pretty backed up in at least one direction for many hours of the day.

If you ask me, I would figure out the best way to get from the ship to the Ashdod train station and take a train north to Haifa. I would recommend buying an anonymous Rav Kav card and a one-day pass that allows unlimited transportation all along the route, so you could basically use trains and buses as a hop-on-hop-off system. Click here to see a map and English explanation of the passes available. Click the Daily pass tab. You would buy the daily pass for what they call "predefined code" 919, which costs ILS 40.

You could also take the train to Beit She'an through the Jezreel Valley, stay in Beit She'an, and then take trains back to Ashdod. I personally like the IYHA youth hostel there, although it is not close to the train station. In this case, you would probably be best off buying a daily pass for what they call the entire country, although it does not include Eilat, predefined code 950, for ILS 60.

Edited by jlajr
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On 11/28/2019 at 4:05 PM, Faival said:

Hi,

we will be in Haifa, Wednesday 14 October 2020 6am - 7pm. On a cruise ship.  We would like to spend the day in Haifa (maybe with a guide).  Have thought about visiting the Baha’i Gardens, Clandestine Musuem & other sights in the City,

 

what are your recommendations?

 

Gillian.

If you choose to hire a guide, I recommend Gary Kamen, a good friend of mine. Please tell him that I recommended him to you.

 

If you are on your own, depending on your mobility, I recommend:

  • Walking from the ship to the Baha'i Gardens via the German Colony, to the right/west of Gate 5, where you will likely exit the port. I've enjoyed visiting the Haifa City Museum there.
  • Walking around the neighborhoods to the left/southeast of Gate 5, on both sides of the main street passing through the area (Derech Ha'atsmaut - Independence Road). For example, if you like brewpubs or just want reference points, look up Libira (colloquially, "I have beer") or Ma'ayan Habira (The Beer Spring).
  • Taking the recently-renovated Carmelit funicular from Paris Square up to Masada station and walking along Masada street, and then taking it all the way up to HaCarmel Center (Merkaz HaCarmel). At HaCarmel Center, there are pubs, cafes, restaurants, and hotels, along with great views down into "the lower city" aka downtown and across the bay to the north. The station is also close to the Baha'i Gardens upper entrance, if you want to go up first and then back down through the gardens to the German Colony.

I forget whether the admins allow this, but if you'd like to read about and see photos of other places in Haifa I've enjoyed visiting, click here (it's my public, not-for-profit Google Photos album of a recent short trip to Haifa).

Edited by jlajr
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11 hours ago, jlajr said:

I disagree. The map shows you driving south from Beit She'an toward Jericho and then west into Jerusalem. Without getting into a whole geopolitical discussion, those roads and highways are on what was the Jordanian side of the Green Line. If you don't go into Jericho itself and follow the roads and highways that are under Israeli control, you might not have any issues with a rental car - but I'm not sure. I recommend checking with the rental car company whether you are allowed to drive on Highway 90 from Beit She'an to the Dead Sea and on Highway 1 from the Dead Sea to Jerusalem.

 

I don't think you would be able to pick up a rental car - I don't think there are any companies right at the Ashdod port - and then drive that entire route in one day. Highways 20 (aka the Ayalon) and 2 along the coast are limited access highways, but they usually have a lot of traffic throughout the day in at least one direction. Highway 4 is technically not a limited access highway, but there aren't any traffic lights on it from Rishon Lezion until Ramat Hasharon. In any case, it also has a lot of traffic on it in at least direction throughout the day. Highway 6 is probably the fastest way north, but it also is usually backed up at a number of places depending on the time of day. Also, I agree, you might have an issue with the toll. Finally, Highway 85 is not a limited-access highway and can be pretty backed up in at least one direction for many hours of the day.

If you ask me, I would figure out the best way to get from the ship to the Ashdod train station and take a train north to Haifa. I would recommend buying an anonymous Rav Kav card and a one-day pass that allows unlimited transportation all along the route, so you could basically use trains and buses as a hop-on-hop-off system. Click here to see a map and English explanation of the passes available. Click the Daily pass tab. You would buy the daily pass for what they call "predefined code" 919, which costs ILS 40.

You could also take the train to Beit She'an through the Jezreel Valley, stay in Beit She'an, and then take trains back to Ashdod. I personally like the IYHA youth hostel there, although it is not close to the train station. In this case, you would probably be best off buying a daily pass for what they call the entire country, although it does not include Eilat, predefined code 950, for ILS 60.

 

 

Many thanks for the reply.

This trip, whatever its routing, will be spread over two full days (ship in-port 6am mon 9th Dec to 6pm tues 10th Dec) and we'll find accommodation somewhere around the Sea of Galilee - knowing that circumstances may dictate cancellation of the port with little or no notice, we're booking a cancel-able car and we'll book the night's accommodation once we're ashore

 

Points taken about the roads - we'll double-check our planned route with the rental company when we arrive, but we've already decided life will be simpler if we stick to the western side of the Sea of Galilee, perhaps overnight in Haifa or Tiberias.

 

We've travelled Hwy 1 from Dead Sea to Jerusalem in a rented car. Shared with fellow-cruisers, we weren't driving but no apparent problem.

We'd picked the car up from an Ashdod agency. Port shuttle to gate, taxi from gate to agency, no worries.

 

One problem - call me dumb but nowhere on the internet can I find what a "limited access highway" is. :classic_huh:

Lots of websites & maps telling me which highways are "limited access", but not what or who is limited. :classic_huh:

Guessing it's not a restriction  on heavy goods vehicles or residents-only.

Do they require vehicle permits or minimum-occupancy or minimum travel distance?

Or is it an Israeli / Palestinian thing?

 

Thanks for the info about trains, but trains just aren't our thing. As per my post, we travel for the journey as much as for the destination.

 

And thanks to the gnome for the recommendations of Tel Aviv's bauhaus architecture in Tel Aviv and artisan Ein Hod.

Modern cities aren't our thing, we're way too old-fashioned. But Ein Hod sounds more like it, and not far off our route.

 

The krunch question is whether "limited access" roads will affect our plans.

We'd be very grateful for an answer to that.

 

JB :classic_smile:

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22 minutes ago, John Bull said:

 

 

Many thanks for the reply.

This trip, whatever its routing, will be spread over two full days (ship in-port 6am mon 9th Dec to 6pm tues 10th Dec) and we'll find accommodation somewhere around the Sea of Galilee - knowing that circumstances may dictate cancellation of the port with little or no notice, we're booking a cancel-able car and we'll book the night's accommodation once we're ashore

 

Points taken about the roads - we'll double-check our planned route with the rental company when we arrive, but we've already decided life will be simpler if we stick to the western side of the Sea of Galilee, perhaps overnight in Haifa or Tiberias.

 

We've travelled Hwy 1 from Dead Sea to Jerusalem in a rented car. Shared with fellow-cruisers, we weren't driving but no apparent problem.

We'd picked the car up from an Ashdod agency. Port shuttle to gate, taxi from gate to agency, no worries.

 

One problem - call me dumb but nowhere on the internet can I find what a "limited access highway" is. :classic_huh:

Lots of websites & maps telling me which highways are "limited access", but not what or who is limited. :classic_huh:

Guessing it's not a restriction  on heavy goods vehicles or residents-only.

Do they require vehicle permits or minimum-occupancy or minimum travel distance?

Or is it an Israeli / Palestinian thing?

 

Thanks for the info about trains, but trains just aren't our thing. As per my post, we travel for the journey as much as for the destination.

 

And thanks to the gnome for the recommendations of Tel Aviv's bauhaus architecture in Tel Aviv and artisan Ein Hod.

Modern cities aren't our thing, we're way too old-fashioned. But Ein Hod sounds more like it, and not far off our route.

 

The krunch question is whether "limited access" roads will affect our plans.

We'd be very grateful for an answer to that.

 

JB :classic_smile:

A limited access highway is one where you can only enter or exit at specific spots. I’m not sure what they call them in the UK. There is nothing that limits who can use them; the limitations are points of ingress and egress. 
 

As an aside, my current rental contract, with Cal-Auto, charges a 52.65 NIS handling fee for driving on toll roads. There is nothing in this contract that limits where I can drive. 

Edited by gnome12
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27 minutes ago, John Bull said:

One problem - call me dumb but nowhere on the internet can I find what a "limited access highway" is. :classic_huh:

Lots of websites & maps telling me which highways are "limited access", but not what or who is limited. :classic_huh:

Guessing it's not a restriction  on heavy goods vehicles or residents-only.

Do they require vehicle permits or minimum-occupancy or minimum travel distance?

Or is it an Israeli / Palestinian thing?

 

Living here 20 years, and I had to google ‘limited access roads’ to find out what the heck they were.  Absolutely nothing political about them- a limited access road is the same all over the world:  It’s simply an inter-city highway which doesn’t have a lot of entry/exit points (therefore limiting access to the highway).  The only affect they will have on your plans is traffic during rush hours, or congestion due to an accident.  Keep in mind though that highway exits in Israel can be spaced very far apart, and you often don’t get much notice about an upcoming exit, so if you miss your exit you may have to travel quite a distance in order to get back on route.

 

The krunch question is whether "limited access" roads will affect our plans.

We'd be very grateful for an answer to that.

 

JB :classic_smile:

 

That cleared it up for me, hope it did for you, too!  Will see if I can help out with more of your post.

Edited by happy trailer
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On 11/28/2019 at 4:41 PM, John Bull said:

 

(yes, we know it's not the quickest :classic_rolleyes:, but apart from wanting to visit the crusader castle at Acre we drive more for the journey than the destination, hence the route up the coast and totally avoiding the main Hwy 6  :classic_smile:)

 

And is it tolerably interesting or scenic?

 

When we get close to Jerusalem, depending on time & weather, we'll consider re-visiting the Dead Sea or Jerusalem or simply head straight back to the ship. 

 

I do my best to help out on these boards.

Now I'm looking for help myself.

 

TIA

 

JB :classic_smile:

 

 

 

 

Since you are planning to see Acre (Akko), you might want to continue up the coast to Nahariyyah and then to Rosh Hanikra, with a possible slight detour on the way to Akko at Zichron Yaacov. 

 

Nahariyyah is a quiet, lovely small seaside town just north of Acre, with Rosh Hanikra a few miles past Nahariyyah.  There are beautiful grottos at Rosh Hanikra, with a cable car ride down to them.  You will also be on the border with Lebanon, and will have an interesting view of the sea border, as well as a stunning view back along the Israeli coastline.   Zichron Yaacov is an upscale suburb of Haifa, high above the coastal road with interesting boutiques and cafes as well as wineries.

 

If you wind up driving back toward Jerusalem via the Dead Sea area, stop at the town of Mitzpeh Yericho, which is the location of an attraction called the ‘Dead Sea Balcony’, with views on one side over the desert, and on the other of the Dead Sea, the city of Jericho, and the red mountains of Jordan.  You can sometimes also see Amman in the distance.  There is also a baptismal site as you begin the approach to the Dead Sea,  Qasr al-Yehud, which you pass by near Jericho.  It is on the Jordan River, and you can speak to people who are visiting it on the Jordanian side.  It’s a big favorite of our family.

 

HTH, and enjoy your visit!

Ruth

Edited to add: If you are into ancient Roman cities, you may want to visit Zippori which about half an hour inland from Akko. 

Edited by happy trailer
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