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This is a very interesting article.  I've seen other posts surrounding how little cruise workers make but this article puts it into perspective for me.

 

1. Median income of approximately $19k per year

2. Their pay is over and above all room, board and medical (per the article)

 

Just the accountant in me is thinking, what is the value of #2?  I know people on land who make $19k before they pay their room, board & medical.

 

This is not a statement about tipping or the service charge - I believe the service charge should be left in place and tip those who go out of their way for you.

 

https://www.businessinsider.com/cruise-ship-workers-reveal-how-much-money-they-make-2019-5

 

What are your thoughts?

 

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Seriously not trying to be snarky but I didn't read the article because I really couldn't care less about how much they make anymore than they care about how much I make.  Additionally, it's really none of anyone's business.  If it was a bad gig they wouldn't be doing it.

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1 hour ago, Shoppie124 said:

 

 

What are your thoughts?

 

This it is pretty interesting. While it certainly isn't a lot of money, it is enough to explain why so many people did it. My last cruise was an MSC cruise. We got to know our waiters and they had all worked for RCCL, NCL, and MSC. Each said NCL was the best one to work for. The income in this article makes that seem true.

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Filipinos on the ships earn more than nurses and teachers back home.  Earning $19,000 while getting food, medical and lodging is at least twice what they could make in the Philippines.  They work more hours than anyone does in the islands, many have spouse and children back home.

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Getting food, lodging, etc.  Doesn't mean they don't still pay for those things at home.    I still pay my mortgage, even though my company reimburses my hotel expenses when I travel for them. 

 

 

.

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On 6/3/2019 at 2:18 PM, Shoppie124 said:

This is a very interesting article.  I've seen other posts surrounding how little cruise workers make but this article puts it into perspective for me.

 

1. Median income of approximately $19k per year

2. Their pay is over and above all room, board and medical (per the article)

 

Just the accountant in me is thinking, what is the value of #2?  I know people on land who make $19k before they pay their room, board & medical.

 

This is not a statement about tipping or the service charge - I believe the service charge should be left in place and tip those who go out of their way for you.

 

https://www.businessinsider.com/cruise-ship-workers-reveal-how-much-money-they-make-2019-5

 

What are your thoughts?

 

To me the article has flaws. It compares what people make in the US. Most of the cruise workers make a nice income compared to where they live. 

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25 minutes ago, sjbdtz said:

Getting food, lodging, etc.  Doesn't mean they don't still pay for those things at home.    I still pay my mortgage, even though my company reimburses my hotel expenses when I travel for them. 

 

 

.

Man I wish my company paid my medical expenses when I was traveling for them though.

 

(not trying to refute any points, but honestly the medical benefit might be the best of all of them)

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21 minutes ago, sjbdtz said:

Getting food, lodging, etc.  Doesn't mean they don't still pay for those things at home.    I still pay my mortgage, even though my company reimburses my hotel expenses when I travel for them. 

 

 

.

Have yet to speak to a Filipino working on a cruise ship who is paying a mortgage.  They travel for work 100% of their working time, living with other family when between sea shifts at home..

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1 hour ago, Laszlo said:

To me the article has flaws. It compares what people make in the US. Most of the cruise workers make a nice income compared to where they live. 

As others have noted, the "room and board" is only significant if the person has no belongings in their home country to pack up when they leave for 10 months, or they would have to pay storage or rent, or a mortgage for their family or belongings.  And a lot of the Filipino are married, so they are paying for housing for their family.  Also, the "median monthly income" extended to an annual salary is flawed, as this monthly salary does not include any time off like weekends that are included in the "normal" US salary.  So, extend the 10 months pay over 12 months (with 2 months of zero salary), and you get a truer picture of the annual income.

 

And, the medical benefits that are included would not be considered as a minimum health care policy in the US.  The MLC 2006  (the guiding convention for seafarers' rights) states that the level of medical care to be provided is to be comparable to that given to workers on shore in the member's (flag state) country, and that the care being provided free to the seafarer must be consistent with the member's (flag state) national law and practices.

 

While MLC 2006 has made things better for seafarers, it is not as  rosy as this article would make you think.

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52 minutes ago, Laszlo said:

To me the article has flaws. It compares what people make in the US. Most of the cruise workers make a nice income compared to where they live. 

I agree.  In many countries around the world, $19K is a lot of money.  I am finding the advent of blogging news people to be the cause of many flawed or one sided articles.

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2 minutes ago, Shoppie124 said:

I agree.  In many countries around the world, $19K is a lot of money.  I am finding the advent of blogging news people to be the cause of many flawed or one sided articles.

It is, and here is a good example. My son works in Macedonia as a Peace Corps worker (teaching English) 6th-12th grades. He lives with a family, husband and wife are teachers at the local school. Each one has been there 25 plus years. Their Combined income is about 800 Euros a Month, right now thats about $900 US dollars. On our last cruise our room steward happened to be from Macedonia, with tips he was making more than twice that amount

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13 hours ago, mugtech said:

Have yet to speak to a Filipino working on a cruise ship who is paying a mortgage.  They travel for work 100% of their working time, living with other family when between sea shifts at home..

Funny, a lot of our room stewards have been Filipino, most had wives and children and a house

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15 minutes ago, Laszlo said:

Funny, a lot of our room stewards have been Filipino, most had wives and children and a house

All true, but none have had a mortgage.  In the Philippines improvements and expansions are usually done in steps when the cash becomes available.  The greatest export of the Philippines is people.

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On 6/3/2019 at 2:14 PM, ColeThornton said:

Seriously not trying to be snarky but I didn't read the article because I really couldn't care less about how much they make anymore than they care about how much I make.  Additionally, it's really none of anyone's business.  If it was a bad gig they wouldn't be doing it.

I disagree with you to some degree. It is interesting and it is something most of us are interested in as it has always been a topic when it comes to how hard they work or don't work versus how much they earn. This is where  the tipping issue always comes in. I don't think how much you or I make is nearly as interesting or eye opening as there situation. But everyone to his/her own idea. The OP just said it was an interesting article. 

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There are about 400K domestic workers in Hong Kong mainly from Philippines and Indonesia. They make about $7000 USD/year and have to work over 12 hours a day, 6 days a week. 

 

So 19K is great for them when you compare how much they make in their own countries. 

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1 hour ago, newmexicoNita said:

I disagree with you to some degree. It is interesting and it is something most of us are interested in as it has always been a topic when it comes to how hard they work or don't work versus how much they earn. This is where  the tipping issue always comes in. I don't think how much you or I make is nearly as interesting or eye opening as there situation. But everyone to his/her own idea. The OP just said it was an interesting article. 

And yet, even if it is interesting to you how hard they work for how much they make, you are applying your standards to both quantities, not the standards of their country.  The crew's "situation" is only "eye opening" when you apply your standards to their hours and wages.  While every single human on the planet would like more money, and this is why the crew request more tips, know that if everyone just left the DSC in place, didn't consider it a "tip" or "gratuity", but just a piece of the price of the cruise, that all crew would be fine with that.  It's what they signed on for, and what they plan their lives on.

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14 hours ago, Kingkonig said:

Man I wish my company paid my medical expenses when I was traveling for them though.

 

(not trying to refute any points, but honestly the medical benefit might be the best of all of them)


 

I'm Canadian.  We don't HAVE medical expenses.     😛

 

 

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3 hours ago, sjbdtz said:


 

I'm Canadian.  We don't HAVE medical expenses.     😛

 

 

 

3 hours ago, chengkp75 said:

And yet, even if it is interesting to you how hard they work for how much they make, you are applying your standards to both quantities, not the standards of their country.  The crew's "situation" is only "eye opening" when you apply your standards to their hours and wages.  While every single human on the planet would like more money, and this is why the crew request more tips, know that if everyone just left the DSC in place, didn't consider it a "tip" or "gratuity", but just a piece of the price of the cruise, that all crew would be fine with that.  It's what they signed on for, and what they plan their lives on.

WOW, I am not sure what you are even talking about. I simply mentioned it was an interesting article for many. NO one is attempting to judge whether tipping is necessary or what is right. Most of us do leave the DSC in place and some of us even tip on top. My point simply was, ti tis an  interesting take on the tipping topic. 

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On 6/3/2019 at 2:18 PM, Shoppie124 said:

This is a very interesting article.  I've seen other posts surrounding how little cruise workers make but this article puts it into perspective for me.

 

1. Median income of approximately $19k per year

2. Their pay is over and above all room, board and medical (per the article)

 

Just the accountant in me is thinking, what is the value of #2?  I know people on land who make $19k before they pay their room, board & medical.

 

This is not a statement about tipping or the service charge - I believe the service charge should be left in place and tip those who go out of their way for you.

 

https://www.businessinsider.com/cruise-ship-workers-reveal-how-much-money-they-make-2019-5

 

What are your thoughts?

 

They could not pay me enough to work as hard as most of the crew members. I do as you do; leave the tip in place and give cash extras to those that I believe deserve it. Kudos to you.

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On 6/3/2019 at 3:14 PM, ColeThornton said:

Seriously not trying to be snarky but I didn't read the article because I really couldn't care less about how much they make anymore than they care about how much I make.  Additionally, it's really none of anyone's business.  If it was a bad gig they wouldn't be doing it.

Have to disagree with you there. Many people do their jobs because it is how they survive. That is why they call it work and not a hobby.

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4 hours ago, sjbdtz said:


 

I'm Canadian.  We don't HAVE medical expenses.     😛

 

 

 

 

Yes you do, you just pay them before you need or use them.  Some never even use what they have already paid for.

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5 hours ago, sjbdtz said:


 

I'm Canadian.  We don't HAVE medical expenses.     😛

 

 

Yes you do, it's called taxes.

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5 hours ago, sjbdtz said:


 

I'm Canadian.  We don't HAVE medical expenses.     😛

 

 

Sure...

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40 minutes ago, Birdie And Sue said:

Where is the interesting part?

The debate that inevitably follows..

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