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jbruch

Beware!! Westerdam Capt. Waits for noboby

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I agree that it is totally the fault of the passenger for missing the ship.

That said, I still have to wonder just how rigid this policy is dictated by the line, or how much latitude the Captain has. I have been at the promenade rail observing sailaway on a few occasions when the ship actually waited almost a half hour beyond departure time for only two late passengers (who were 'greeted' by a chorus of boos and catcalls from other passengers). I can see waiting for a busload on a ship shorex, but only two passengers?

 

Bob, pretty sure various items come into play (some have been mentioned):

harbor master and port regulations

pilot on board (on his own schedule/more ships to do)

traffic in and out port

ships schedule (timing)

weather en route

probably missing a bunch

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Wow....I am so sorry for your family for what they went through. There is so much behind the scenes that we have no idea goes on-there are reasons why the ship has to untie at a certain time, and leave at a certain time even though a passenger will be 5 minutes late. I sympathize with you but if 100 passengers were all 5 minutes late and knew the ship would wait, people would just wander back whenever they wanted. There are fines imposed on ships for things you wouldn't even be aware of-but they are quite clear you have to be onboard the ship at a certain time.

 

It was a costly error on your part and I don't think HAL is to blame as other ships have the same rules. I don't think you would like to test it out on another cruise line though and let us know? :rolleyes:

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Every time a missing the boat thread comes up I wonder if the sales pitch for the line excursions is true. "If your tour is late we will wait for you"

Has anyone been late or been delayed due to a cruise line tour being late?

 

I have absolutely seen the ship wait for a late tour bus..... MANY times. Except for extreme circumstances such as the ship must depart by a certain time or cannot fit under the bridge as the tide will rise, the ship ALMOST always wait for its buses to return.

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I really do agree with the general line of this thread that it is up to you to be back, and if you are not, you risk being left behind. That is simply the way it is. On the other hand, there is a bit of a conflicting position going on as well. Someone said the ship has to go when the ship has to go, period. BUT if there were a ship's excursion that was late, the ship will wait. Didn't we just hear that the ship has to go when it is supposed to go?

 

I do understand that a ship cannot wait interminably for people, and if they don't know when the people are coming, they have to leave. In this case, however, the ship is still there. The guy could essentially climb about without the gangway (I don't know what system they used at this port, but if there was a door a few feet above the wharf, then they could have figured out a way, OR what if he went out on the pilot boat. If someone is on the dock while the ship is still tied up, then you can a) go by the letter of the law and leave him/her there, or b) open a door and let the guy get aboard.

 

Just a quick story. We were leaving Yokosuka, Japan many moons ago. As the ship was preparing to depart, the skipper looked down from the wing on the bridge, and there was my DW crying hysterically. (He did know her, so he knew who it was though I was a mere junior officer.) The ship was due to leave, there were tugs ready to go, the brows had been taken away, etc. The captain called to have the brows brought back -- this takes a large crane when you are taking about an aircraft carrier (the "door" is an opening to the hangar deck 30 feet up). He gave everyone an extra half an hour on the dock. No need to do that. We were due to depart. But he showed some humanity. Now would the captain before him have done that? No way!

 

The captain of the Westerdam was right. Not very humane, but right. The passenger was wrong, without question, but right to feel that the captain could have taken care of it without any serious repercussions. By the way, if that had been his wife who was late, he would have waited!

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If the ship had still been tied to the dock, and it was just a question of running the gangplank back out, and letting this guy jump on, then I would be all for it.

In my book rules are meant to be broken, if it helps someone, but hurts no one.

 

But I think the fact that they had already pulled in the lines did him in.

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I have seen pax who were late brought out to the ship in the pilot boat (Ensenada, Mexico, a long time ago on RCCL). But doing that opens up a new can of worms and a pretty good increase in liability for the cruise line (speaking of passenger safety) and that's climbing a Jacob's ladder:eek:. Ever done it?

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This is so silly!!!

 

As mentioned, the OP thinks the ship should NOT set, and, most importantly, stick to a specific departure time, but should just wait until everyone is onboard. So, if people decide they want dinner ashore, and don't come back until 9pm, no worries. The ship will wait. Dinner and a show in town? No problem, the ship will wait.

 

That might create just a little havoc with schedules, but hey, if we stall in every port a couple of hours, maybe we can stretch a scheduled 7 day cruise a few extra days!!

 

Makes perfect sense to me!:D:D:D

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We always watch this amazing scenario from our balcony when we are leaving. People are running, and I mean running, to the ship as there are those on balconies screaming, "hurry!", catcalls, whistles and so on. It is truly a sight to see as there are those rushing to catch the ship before the horn blows.

God Bless the Captain.:)

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.....

 

I do understand that a ship cannot wait interminably for people, and if they don't know when the people are coming, they have to leave. In this case, however, the ship is still there. The guy could essentially climb about without the gangway (I don't know what system they used at this port, but if there was a door a few feet above the wharf, then they could have figured out a way, OR what if he went out on the pilot boat. If someone is on the dock while the ship is still tied up, then you can a) go by the letter of the law and leave him/her there, or b) open a door and let the guy get aboard......

Once cleared by customs of whatever country is involved, a ship cannot re lower the gangplank or allow anyone else to board via door, tender or any other means, without incurring hefty fees, such as port taxes, etc, which would then be passed onto us, the passengers on the cruise at that time.

 

I look at it this way, if you are an idiot and cannot make it back to ship on time, why should I have to pay for your stupidity?

 

Joanie

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totally agree with majority on this one

 

OP had no one to blame but himself

 

there is no excuse, other than for a medical emergency, for missing sail a away especially if you've sailed 10 times and know what can happen if you venture out alone without "protection" of ship's tour group

 

at same time, though, I have a hard time "swallowing" the story as told

 

I can't think of 1 captain in the fleet who would "just get up and leave" in a circumstance where the Pax could be seen "running for the ship" while it was still tied up .. I have a more difficult time accepting that any captain would publicly announce he "waited for no one"

 

"something'" or a whole series of "somethings" are, IMHO, missing from this story

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the ship was still docked, just untied with gangway lifted

 

As other posters have said, many factors come into play when leaving a port. When I was in Puarta Vallarta in 2008, the Oosterdam had actually left the dock when about 4 people were seen running for the ship. As many of us watched, the ship returned to the dock, and one person tried to climb a rope ladder to get on, but couldn't do it. The ship then lowered the gangway, and all 4 people came aboard.

Edited by luvcruisn'

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Bob, pretty sure various items come into play (some have been mentioned):

 

harbor master and port regulations

pilot on board (on his own schedule/more ships to do)

traffic in and out port

ships schedule (timing)

weather en route

 

probably missing a bunch

 

No sir - you're right on. My cousin is a river pilot on the Mississippi and has piloted many a cruise ship from the mouth of the Mississippi to New Orleans, and visa versa. In some cases, the captain has discretion - in other cases he does not. The harbormaster and port authority have the final say, UNLESS there are problems on board ship.

 

Once the last line is pulled from the dock, the ship is considerd to be "sailed". You don't just back up, tie up again, and drop the gangway. Whether the OP could have been taken out the ship in the pilot boat is again up to that particular port authority. Loads of liability there.....

 

It is the responsibility of all passengers to be on board AT LEAST 30 minutes before sailing time. That is posted in every ship's newsletter, announced each morning when arriving in port, and clearly posted at the ship's gangway. I feel sympathy for the OP's predicament, but there is no need to rant against HAL or any other cruise line, simply because the ship is following protocol and sailed as scheduled. And as previously stated, the other 1300+ passengers seemed to make it back on board in time....:rolleyes:

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I keep wondering how come his wife and kids made it safely aboard and not him. Maybe she sent him back out to buy that cute little something from the shop at the end of the pier! :D:D

Edited by jtl513

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Just to show the OP that HAL is NOT alone in leaving late passengers behind, watch this and turn your volume up.

 

Joanie

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I've seen it happen on several occasions, and I actually have a video of a couple running down the pier in Antigua, chasing the NCL Pearl as we began to back our of the mooring. The audio indicates the passengers were cheering for the Captain. As it turns out, the Pilot was already on board, and the Pilot boat was just begining to follow the Pearl out of the slip. The two passengers were yelling up to the wing of the bridge claiming their kids were were already on board, but is didn't make a difference. They were lucky the Pilot boat stopped and let them climb aboard, and they were able to buy their passage out to the ship when it stopped to drop the Pilot off. I'm sorry, but I really don't think the OP has any right to blame anyone but him or herself for missing the posted gangway closed time posted all over the ship!

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Beware cruisers!!! I recently went on a cruise on the Westerdam and in the port of Aruba I was left behind with my wife and 2 kids begging the ship to wait a couple more minuites for me. When we booked this cruise the departure time in Aruba was 5pm but once we arrived it was announced the "All aboard time" was 4:30. The gangway was lifted at 4:41 as outlined in the ship log. What horrible service!! To sail early when a customer is missing from the ship?? I was 5 minutes too late. Granted I should have been more timely but mistakes, accidents do happen. My wife pleaded for them to wait, there was even communication from the port security that I was running to catch the ship and the Captain stated that he "waits for no one". I offered $1000.00 to lower the gangway back down ( the ship was still docked, just untied with gangway lifted) or even tender me out and again the Captain stated that he waits for no one. BEWARE!! Horrible service with no regard to passenger safety. Long story short my wife and 2 kids had 2 1/2 days at sea without me and I had to fly back to Ft. Lauderdale to meet them. Why would a ship sail early when passengers are missing?? This was my 10th cruise and I will never sail Holland America again. Even there corporate customer service was bad with a focus on covering there A$$ and backing the Capt. on his bad decision. Don't be late or this cruise line will leave you, no questions asked!!!

 

I've got news for you.

We have sailed for years on various cruise lines and have seen passengers (and crew members) miss the ship on NCL, Princess and HAL several times -- and most by just a few minutes.

It's your fault!!

You shouldn't be complaining about something you did.

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Bob, pretty sure various items come into play (some have been mentioned):

 

harbor master and port regulations

pilot on board (on his own schedule/more ships to do)

traffic in and out port

ships schedule (timing)

weather en route

 

probably missing a bunch

 

In May 2009, the Zuiderdam's captain delayed setting sail from Vancouver for almost 45 minutes. Why? The ship's priest hadn't been cleared by Canadian officials so he decided to wait for him.

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I tried to get on at 4:48 or so. And am totally to blame, but to leave early when other family memebers are on board and to leave early?? Why not at least wait until 5pm, what's the hurry and what happened to passenger safety and service.

 

Passenger Safety & Service?:confused:... What has that to do with this story..You were not 5 minutes late- you were 18 minutes late! You believe you deserved special treatment? And to think you could buy it is ludicrous..

If I remember correctly from our Aruba stop, we had to sail when there were no planes trying to land at the airport. That day the planes were coming in from the sea and when the airport said GO, we went. But a Delta plane sure came in low just above us as we went by the landing runway.

 

Another Passenger who was on your cruise sees it differently..

 

I agree that it is totally the fault of the passenger for missing the ship.

That said, I still have to wonder just how rigid this policy is dictated by the line, or how much latitude the Captain has. I have been at the promenade rail observing sailaway on a few occasions when the ship actually waited almost a half hour beyond departure time for only two late passengers (who were 'greeted' by a chorus of boos and catcalls from other passengers). I can see waiting for a busload on a ship shorex, but only two passengers?

 

There are many factors involved & the poster I quoted above & Copper 10 explained them: Quote

harbor master and port regulations

pilot on board (on his own schedule/more ships to do)

traffic in and out port

ships schedule (timing)

weather en route

Unquote

I agree with everyone else..This is completely the passenger's fault not HAL's..If he has actually sailed on ten other cruises, he should have known, that many times a Captain is forced by the port authorities, wind & tide conditions to leave earlier than scheduled..Occassionally it's immediately after the time all passengers are required to be on board..

I'm also wondering if his wife actually pleaded with the Captain or did she threaten him & HA with legal action ?;)

Betty

Edited by serendipity1499

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Every time a missing the boat thread comes up I wonder if the sales pitch for the line excursions is true. "If your tour is late we will wait for you"

Has anyone been late or been delayed due to a cruise line tour being late?

 

Personal experience... Carnival Glory in March 2005. DH and I were on a ship's excursion in Belize (Cave Tubing). During the return trip via bus, a fire broke out at the landfill. Our tour bus was stopped in the highway due to the fire trucks and water lines crossing the roadway. (There were also armed guards circling our bus ... "Don't worry. You are perfectly safe. They are with us!"...event occurred just before a local uprising the following week... but that's another story.)

 

We were nervously looking at our watches and fretting the approach of the departure time. We still had to tender once we got back to the International Zone!

 

As our tender approached the ship, the anchor cleared the surface of the water. Yes, they were especially waiting for our tour to return. Whew. We didn't even get to buy a postcard on that trip. Too close for comfort.

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I also hope OP returns to tell us how wife and children managed to return on time but he didn't. Is wife speaking to him yet? :D :eek:

 

I also hope he tells us how he managed re: passport. Did he have it with him or was it left with Port Agent to give him?

 

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I agree that it is totally the fault of the passenger for missing the ship.

That said, I still have to wonder just how rigid this policy is dictated by the line, or how much latitude the Captain has. I have been at the promenade rail observing sailaway on a few occasions when the ship actually waited almost a half hour beyond departure time for only two late passengers (who were 'greeted' by a chorus of boos and catcalls from other passengers). I can see waiting for a busload on a ship shorex, but only two passengers?

 

It depends on the surrounding of the Pier.

 

As the post above yours noted, at Aruba, the airport is just right next to the pier with the approaching directly towards it. You have a time window to sail and miss that, you have to wait for another slot, which can be hours away.

 

I forgot which port, it was on a Eastern Caribbean itinerary on Princess.

At the berth - Princess on one side, Carnival on the other. Lots of passengers still on the pier walking towards the ship. Our ship, Princess has already lifted the gangway but haven't untied the ropes yet. We saw a man was running and then suddenly came to an abrupt haul - DH said he must be Princess passenger and saw the gangway was already up. Lucky for him we were still not untied. He waved frantically towards the Bridge where 2 officers were standing, watching the departure process. Then they noticed him. Princess lowered the gangway and the guy boarded, in the midst of booing from fellow passengers watching above!

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Beware cruisers!!! I recently went on a cruise on the Westerdam and in the port of Aruba I was left behind with my wife and 2 kids begging the ship to wait a couple more minuites for me. When we booked this cruise the departure time in Aruba was 5pm but once we arrived it was announced the "All aboard time" was 4:30. The gangway was lifted at 4:41 as outlined in the ship log. What horrible service!! To sail early when a customer is missing from the ship?? I was 5 minutes too late. Granted I should have been more timely but mistakes, accidents do happen. My wife pleaded for them to wait, there was even communication from the port security that I was running to catch the ship and the Captain stated that he "waits for no one". I offered $1000.00 to lower the gangway back down ( the ship was still docked, just untied with gangway lifted) or even tender me out and again the Captain stated that he waits for no one. BEWARE!! Horrible service with no regard to passenger safety. Long story short my wife and 2 kids had 2 1/2 days at sea without me and I had to fly back to Ft. Lauderdale to meet them. Why would a ship sail early when passengers are missing?? This was my 10th cruise and I will never sail Holland America again. Even there corporate customer service was bad with a focus on covering there A$$ and backing the Capt. on his bad decision. Don't be late or this cruise line will leave you, no questions asked!!!

Oh isn't this so typical, not wanting to take any personal responsibility for your own actions, come on.........why is it everyone's fault but yours.....I'm sorry it happened to you but you have no one to blame but yourself. Hopefully you've learned a lesson but I have a strong feeling the answer would be no...........

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Beware cruisers!!! I recently went on a cruise on the Westerdam and in the port of Aruba I was left behind with my wife and 2 kids begging the ship to wait a couple more minuites for me. When we booked this cruise the departure time in Aruba was 5pm but once we arrived it was announced the "All aboard time" was 4:30. The gangway was lifted at 4:41 as outlined in the ship log. What horrible service!! To sail early when a customer is missing from the ship?? I was 5 minutes too late. Granted I should have been more timely but mistakes, accidents do happen. My wife pleaded for them to wait, there was even communication from the port security that I was running to catch the ship and the Captain stated that he "waits for no one". I offered $1000.00 to lower the gangway back down ( the ship was still docked, just untied with gangway lifted) or even tender me out and again the Captain stated that he waits for no one. BEWARE!! Horrible service with no regard to passenger safety. Long story short my wife and 2 kids had 2 1/2 days at sea without me and I had to fly back to Ft. Lauderdale to meet them. Why would a ship sail early when passengers are missing?? This was my 10th cruise and I will never sail Holland America again. Even there corporate customer service was bad with a focus on covering there A$$ and backing the Capt. on his bad decision. Don't be late or this cruise line will leave you, no questions asked!!!

 

Sorry to hear this. Are you going to tell us why your wife and kids were onboard but you were not?

 

It is also too bad there wasn't another boat that could bring you to the ship. I saw a young couple miss the ship (Westerdam) in Monaco in 2007, and they were brought out by the local officials and had to climb aboard. The Captain made an announcement that he was slowing down to pick them up and couple still do so since the ship was not yet in international waters.

 

 

The ship has a scheduled port time which they pay for, and normally has to leave on schedule.

 

The All aboard time is always prior to the scheduled departure. I was surprised on Azamara it was actually 15 minutes prior to departure.

Edited by Jade13

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