Jump to content
,

SS Future Re-Open Plan: Timing, Testing Needs??!!


TLCOhio
 Share

Recommended Posts

I think that qualifies you as "intrepid", @Catlover54! I hope your trip is splendid.

Maybe I can get my doc to test my antibodies, but she likely will say get the shot. Always has before, and as you note, it's the algorithmic party line.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/7/2022 at 1:59 AM, Catlover54 said:

I leave next week for the classical music cruise Ocean Sun Festival on Hapag Lloyd's MS Europa, Spain and Portugal, and then go to Germany to visit friends,  and then the next cruise is scheduled with DH in September (Canada).

 

Sounds like a great, exciting cruise and wonderful travels for our California friend.  Hopefully when returning, you will share some of the highlights and experience details.  Appreciate all of these various comments and helpful follow-ups.  Keep it coming!!  Sadly, this whole situation is not totally behind us and over. 

 

For me, sorry I have not posted most lately as we were busy last week doing  seven days at Disney World and Universal Studios with our two grandsons, ages nine and eleven, plus family celebrating our 50th Wedding Anniversary.  Great time and wonderful experiences!! 

 

From a newspaper story and a Wall Street-related website yesterday, they had this headline: Carnival Cruise line cuts passenger capacity as COVID cases increase with these highlights:The cruise line industry has been working overtime to ensure safety and health, spending millions on updating their ships.  When the pandemic hit, the cruise line industry was hit especially hard  Because cruise lines nearly always flag their ships outside of the U.S. in order to work around American labor laws, 'this gives the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention more sway over the cruise industry than it has over perhaps any other form of travel.' 

 

Here is more from their reporting: "While we’d all love for the pandemic to be over, it’s not, and health officials recently identified the ultra contagious Omicron Subvariant BA.2.12.1. The new subvariant is set to become dominant in the United States soon, but new infections are already starting to cause headaches for everyone, the cruise industry very much included. Already, Carnival Cruises has announced that it’s begun limiting passenger capacity on several sailings on its U.K.-based Cunard Line, canceling several bookings in the process.  Carnival has revealed that ongoing travel difficulties across international borders are causing challenges for the company. That is making it difficult to fully staff its ships, owing to difficulties with testing requirements, quarantine periods, and other health and safety protocols.  Rather than cut back on the quality of service, which would result in longer lines and waits and reduced amenities, they’ve opted to reduce guest capacity for the Queen Victoria and Queen Mary 2."

 

Full story at:

https://www.star-telegram.com/news/nation-world/national/article261379282.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio   

 

Venice: Loving It & Why??!!  Is one of your future desires or past favorites? See these many visual samples for its great history and architecture.  This posting is now at 95,845 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1278226

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, TLCOhio said:

 

Sounds like a great, exciting cruise and wonderful travels for our California friend.  Hopefully when returning, you will share some of the highlights and experience details.  Appreciate all of these various comments and helpful follow-ups.  Keep it coming!!  Sadly, this whole situation is not totally behind us and over. 

 

For me, sorry I have not posted most lately as we were busy last week doing  seven days at Disney World and Universal Studios with our two grandsons, ages nine and eleven, plus family celebrating our 50th Wedding Anniversary.  Great time and wonderful experiences!! 

 

From a newspaper story and a Wall Street-related website yesterday, they had this headline: Carnival Cruise line cuts passenger capacity as COVID cases increase with these highlights:The cruise line industry has been working overtime to ensure safety and health, spending millions on updating their ships.  When the pandemic hit, the cruise line industry was hit especially hard  Because cruise lines nearly always flag their ships outside of the U.S. in order to work around American labor laws, 'this gives the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention more sway over the cruise industry than it has over perhaps any other form of travel.' 

 

Here is more from their reporting: "While we’d all love for the pandemic to be over, it’s not, and health officials recently identified the ultra contagious Omicron Subvariant BA.2.12.1. The new subvariant is set to become dominant in the United States soon, but new infections are already starting to cause headaches for everyone, the cruise industry very much included. Already, Carnival Cruises has announced that it’s begun limiting passenger capacity on several sailings on its U.K.-based Cunard Line, canceling several bookings in the process.  Carnival has revealed that ongoing travel difficulties across international borders are causing challenges for the company. That is making it difficult to fully staff its ships, owing to difficulties with testing requirements, quarantine periods, and other health and safety protocols.  Rather than cut back on the quality of service, which would result in longer lines and waits and reduced amenities, they’ve opted to reduce guest capacity for the Queen Victoria and Queen Mary 2."

 

Full story at:

https://www.star-telegram.com/news/nation-world/national/article261379282.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio   

 

Venice: Loving It & Why??!!  Is one of your future desires or past favorites? See these many visual samples for its great history and architecture.  This posting is now at 95,845 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1278226

Thanks Terry an congratulations on 50 years!  Mrs Banjo and I will be 42 years this May.  You Always have the most interesting info.  For us with the cv-19 variations still going around, sadly we will refrain from cruising again this year.  Hopefully, someday this will end and we can get back to cruising, but right now, just too many stumbling blocks are still in place.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/13/2022 at 11:18 AM, TLCOhio said:

 Rather than cut back on the quality of service, which would result in longer lines and waits and reduced amenities, they’ve opted to reduce guest capacity for the Queen Victoria and Queen Mary 2."

 

 

Want to maintain the reputation of the brand?  Makes good sense to me for them to do so.

 

On 5/13/2022 at 11:18 AM, TLCOhio said:

Carnival Cruise line cuts passenger capacity as COVID cases increase

 

Negative news in view of what RCI's CEO said was the passenger load percentage to need to make enough of a profit in order to start nibbling at reducing the company's debt load.  I have not read any such statement from CCL, but, there has to be a magic number of passenger load percentage that they want to achieve.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/13/2022 at 7:54 PM, crusinbanjo said:

Thanks Terry and congratulations on 50 years!  Mrs Banjo and I will be 42 years this May.  You Always have the most interesting info.  For us with the cv-19 variations still going around, sadly we will refrain from cruising again this year.  Hopefully, someday this will end and we can get back to cruising, but right now, just too many stumbling blocks are still in place.  

 

Appreciate these kind comments and follow-up from Mr. Banjo.  Congrats for your upcoming 42nd anniversary.  You are getting close to your magic 50th!!

 

On your mention of "many stumbling blocks", let me give you a personal example that came up this week. My wife's brother lives in Kansas and just got back Sunday from nearly two weeks touring Ireland, much of it by bus in a group of 25 people.  It worked well and was fun for them.  BUT, during and/or at the end of this travel, a total of eight participants tested positive for Covid.  Ouch!!  That triggered complications, especially if you are needing to be quarantined so very far from home.  Everyone had the shots and boosters, etc., on their Ireland tour.  That fear of needing to do added testing and potentially getting locked down so far away does raise questions . . . and risks!!    As first mentioned many months ago, the variants continue to mutate and add to ALL of the uncertainties.  Am I missing something and/or being unfair?

 

From CNBC cable financial news Sunday, they had this headline: A severe pilot shortage in the U.S. leaves airlines scrambling for solutions with these highlights: “The pandemic exacerbated a pilot shortage by slowing down training, hiring and a creating a wave of early retirements.  Airlines offered pilots early retirements to cut labor bills during the depths of the pandemic.  The process to become airline-qualified in the U.S. is lengthy and expensive, making the barrier to entry high.”

 

Here is more: "The United States is facing its worst pilot shortage in recent memory, forcing airlines to cut flights just as travelers are returning after more than two years of the Covid-19 pandemic.  The crisis has the industry scrambling for solutions.  At least one lawmaker is said to be considering legislation that could raise the federally-mandated retirement age for airline pilots from 65 to 67 or higher to extend aviators’ time in the skies.   The Covid pandemic halted pilot hiring as training and licensing slowed.  Major U.S. airlines are trying to hire more than 12,000 pilots combined this year alone, more than double the previous record in annual hiring.  The shortage is particularly acute at regional carriers that feed major airlines’ hubs from smaller cities."

 

As the cruise lines seek to return to some form of "normal", the airline flights, costs and avails are a part of that overall, long-term solution.  For most people, including us, you cannot cruise unless you first can get to the departure port and know your way back home works, too!

 

Full story at:

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/05/15/us-pilot-shortage-forces-airlines-to-cut-flights-scramble-for-solutions.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio   

 

Amazon River-Caribbean 2015 adventure live/blog starting in Barbados. Many visuals from this amazing river and Caribbean Islands (Dutch ABC's, St. Barts, Dominica, Grenada, San Juan, etc.).  Now at 69,821 views:

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2157696

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

From the Miami Herald and MSN News yesterday, they had this headline: Cruise bookings smash records. And passengers are accepting COVID-19 likely will be aboard with these highlights: Nearly a year since cruising restarted in North American waters following a 15-month pandemic hiatus, many cruise vacation travelers appear willing to accept the risk of getting the infectious disease that’s gripped the world for two years.  Two of the global cruise line leaders based in Miami — Carnival and Royal Caribbean — are reporting record reservations for voyages, despite COVID-19 infecting the large majority of ships now sailing.  Of 92 cruise ships in U.S. waters on   Thursday, 70 of them are under investigation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for coronavirus outbreaks. The CDC investigates outbreaks when at least 0.3% of a ship’s passengers and crew members test positive for the virus.  The federal health agency data shows the outbreaks are nowhere near as widespread as in December 2021 and January when the omicron variant emerged, and eventually all 92 ships sailing in the U.S. early this year were being scrutinized for onboard virus cases. In late December, the CDC had suggested all travelers, even those vaccinated, should avoid cruising.

 

Here is more from this reporting: "Cruise industry leaders have acknowledged that having coronavirus cases on ships is the new normal, but say the infection rates are less than in the general population and the industry’s public health safety protocols are more stringent than most public settings.  'Yes, there will be COVID on the ships, but there’s COVID everywhere in society,' said Arnold Donald, the soon-departing CEO of Carnival Corporation, at the Seatrade global cruise conference in April in Miami Beach. 'Because people are vaccinated, the chances of them having a serious outcome from COVID is reduced. We have protocols to mitigate risk on ships.'  Cruise Lines International Association, the cruise industry trade and lobbying group in Washington, D.C., said in April its global market research found that 84% of people who had cruised in March said they would cruise again, and that 69% of people who never cruised are open to it."

 

Good, realistic news and information?

 

Full story at:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/cruise-bookings-smash-records-and-passengers-are-accepting-covid-19-likely-will-be-aboard/ar-AAXjzmG?ocid=BingNewsSearch

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

AFRICA?!!?: Fun, interesting visuals, plus travel details from this early 2016 live/blog. At 52,727 views. Featuring Cape Town, South Africa’s coast, Mozambique, Victoria Falls/Zambia and Botswana's famed Okavango Delta.

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2310337

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, TLCOhio said:

"Cruise industry leaders have acknowledged that having coronavirus cases on ships is the new normal,

 

My thought:  slowly, those who want to cruise are accepting this new new normal.  Covid, as serious as it can be, has gained a notoriety that a fellow virus Novo failed to achieve.  

 

How many choose not to cruise because of the fear of contracting Novo?  

 

Are those who want to cruise/vacation/live outside of their cave becoming more comfortable with, very simply, just another risk of living?

 

The means exist to be as well as possible to deal with such a risk.  Does one want to do so?  Cruise companies can't answer that question.  But, they can and should, in my opinion, say, "you want to sail on one of our cruises, then, you will be fully vaccinated before you set foot on one of our ships."  The definition of "fully vaccinated" is going to vary, I expect.  But, whatever it is, there is NO excuse why vaccination requirements that had to be observed in the past ought not to be enforced in 2022 and beyond.  

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Except some countries vaccinate more than others - are we to be banned because we have had no jab since our 3rd jab (booster) in November 2021 - and frankly none planned unless something else goes wrong with the virus expanding?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/17/2022 at 9:07 AM, TLCOhio said:

 

Appreciate these kind comments and follow-up from Mr. Banjo.  Congrats for your upcoming 42nd anniversary.  You are getting close to your magic 50th!!

 

On your mention of "many stumbling blocks", let me give you a personal example that came up this week. My wife's brother lives in Kansas and just got back Sunday from nearly two weeks touring Ireland, much of it by bus in a group of 25 people.  It worked well and was fun for them.  BUT, during and/or at the end of this travel, a total of eight participants tested positive for Covid.  Ouch!!  That triggered complications, especially if you are needing to be quarantined so very far from home.  Everyone had the shots and boosters, etc., on their Ireland tour.  That fear of needing to do added testing and potentially getting locked down so far away does raise questions . . . and risks!!    As first mentioned many months ago, the variants continue to mutate and add to ALL of the uncertainties.  Am I missing something and/or being unfair?

 

From CNBC cable financial news Sunday, they had this headline: A severe pilot shortage in the U.S. leaves airlines scrambling for solutions with these highlights: “The pandemic exacerbated a pilot shortage by slowing down training, hiring and a creating a wave of early retirements.  Airlines offered pilots early retirements to cut labor bills during the depths of the pandemic.  The process to become airline-qualified in the U.S. is lengthy and expensive, making the barrier to entry high.”

 

Here is more: "The United States is facing its worst pilot shortage in recent memory, forcing airlines to cut flights just as travelers are returning after more than two years of the Covid-19 pandemic.  The crisis has the industry scrambling for solutions.  At least one lawmaker is said to be considering legislation that could raise the federally-mandated retirement age for airline pilots from 65 to 67 or higher to extend aviators’ time in the skies.   The Covid pandemic halted pilot hiring as training and licensing slowed.  Major U.S. airlines are trying to hire more than 12,000 pilots combined this year alone, more than double the previous record in annual hiring.  The shortage is particularly acute at regional carriers that feed major airlines’ hubs from smaller cities."

 

As the cruise lines seek to return to some form of "normal", the airline flights, costs and avails are a part of that overall, long-term solution.  For most people, including us, you cannot cruise unless you first can get to the departure port and know your way back home works, too!

 

Full story at:

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/05/15/us-pilot-shortage-forces-airlines-to-cut-flights-scramble-for-solutions.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio   

 

Amazon River-Caribbean 2015 adventure live/blog starting in Barbados. Many visuals from this amazing river and Caribbean Islands (Dutch ABC's, St. Barts, Dominica, Grenada, San Juan, etc.).  Now at 69,821 views:

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2157696

Wow, Terry great story and information as always.  I’m thinking, as a licensed pilot, maybe I should apply for a job?  With all the inflation and such I could use the extra cash, Oh wait, I’m past the mandatory retirement  age.  Oh well.

 

your story of your wife’s brother’s experience is exactly why we are again abstaining from cruising and international travel.  The flight difficulties just add another uncontrollable block to stumble over.  (Stumblefoot, please don’t take offense at all the stumble references. haha)

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/18/2022 at 4:52 PM, crusinbanjo said:

Wow, Terry great story and information as always.  I’m thinking, as a licensed pilot, maybe I should apply for a job?  With all the inflation and such I could use the extra cash, Oh wait, I’m past the mandatory retirement  age.  your story of your wife’s brother’s experience is exactly why we are again abstaining from cruising and international travel.  The flight difficulties just add another uncontrollable block to stumble over.

 

Appreciate this great follow-up from Mr. Banjo.  To add to the story about my wife's brother and the Covid challenges from their Ireland trip, here is more.  My brother-in-law's wife has now picked up Covid, too.  At least they are home in Kansas, but, clearly it is not fun having these challenges from international travel and adventure.    

 

From this below-connected financial website this morning, they had this headline: When Will Royal Caribbean, Carnival, Norwegian Drop Vaccines, Testing?" with this sub-headline: "One of the big three cruise lines just extended its covid-related protocols in the United States until the end of September.

 

Here are some of their reporting highlights: “For an industry vulnerable to storms in general, it was a terrible combination of events that left the industry shuttered, while hotels, theme parks, arenas, and other venues all remained closed for much less time.  That's because the United States government only has limited control over how private industry operates. A local municipality may shutdown industries like the way New York closed Broadway or California shut down its theme parks — but the federal government only has limited power for certain things.  When it comes to cruise lines, however, the federal government has an incredible amount of power.

 

Here is more: "Royal Caribbean recently told its booked passengers that it plans to keep its current covid protocols in place through the end of September. Many passengers and future passengers want to know how long these protocols will be in place. It's possible the CDC changes these requirements, but probably not any time soon, according to former Food and Drug Administration chief Scott Gottlieb, a physician who serves as chairman of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings’ SailSafe Council.  'I think that it’s likely to be a requirement that is in place through this fall and winter,' Gottlieb said. 'I’m talking more about CDC and the policy environment. I think that the public health officials, CDC, is going to want to see what the epidemiology of this disease is when it gets to a quote, unquote, ‘normal’ state.'  Gottlieb said he does not expect the CDC to make any changes until it sees a period of time where no new variants flare up.  He said he thinks the federal agency will wait until 2023 and not even first thing next year."

 

Full story at:

https://www.thestreet.com/investing/when-will-royal-caribbean-carnival-norwegian-drop-vaccines-testing

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Kotor/Montenegro:  Exciting visual samples, tips, details, etc., for this scenic, historic location. Over 49,210 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1439193

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/18/2022 at 2:52 PM, crusinbanjo said:

Wow, Terry great story and information as always.  I’m thinking, as a licensed pilot, maybe I should apply for a job?  With all the inflation and such I could use the extra cash, Oh wait, I’m past the mandatory retirement  age.  Oh well.

 

your story of your wife’s brother’s experience is exactly why we are again abstaining from cruising and international travel.  The flight difficulties just add another uncontrollable block to stumble over.  (Stumblefoot, please don’t take offense at all the stumble references. haha)

Thanks for highlighting Terry's story about Covid on the bus in Ireleand, and thank you Terry for telling it.  Just booked a last minute cruise on SS which includes bus transfer from London to Southampton. We have now booked private transfer from London to Southampton. 😉

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From the New York Times Travel Section yesterday, they had this headline: What’s Going on With the Testing Requirement for Travel?" with this sub-headline: "The requirement to test for Covid before flying to the United States is hated by many travelers and the U.S. travel industry. But the government shows no sign of getting rid of it.

 

Here are some of their reporting highlights:As countries, including Canada and Britain, have lifted their Covid testing requirements for vaccinated visitors in recent months, some Americans are irate that they still have to show a negative test to board a flight back to the United States.  Jason Miller, a 37-year-old software engineer who lives in Texas, is so frustrated with the rule that he recently sent letters to the White House and several lawmakers and began encouraging others to do the same. 'I support the C.D.C., still wear a N95 mask when in crowds and when I travel,' he said. But, he no longer feels that the rule provides value, in large part because 'the testing has not stopped variants from entering the country.'  Other travelers have posted similar comments on social media, and a good portion of the travel industry in the United States has made clear it feels the same way.  But they have gotten little satisfaction from the Biden administration and public health officials.  On May 6, Jen Psaki, then the White House press secretary, said she was 'not aware of a timeline' for ending the testing requirement and that the administration would base its decision on a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation. As to what, specifically, the C.D.C. is using to determine whether testing is still necessary, an agency spokeswoman offered the vague explanation that it 'is looking at different indicators' and 'evaluating all guidance and orders based on the latest science and state of the pandemic.' 

 

Here was a key bottom-line summary in this comprehensive NY Times story: "The obligatory test has not just created logistical hassles, it has fundamentally shifted the experience of traveling internationally, travelers say."

 

YES, sadly, this story sums up so much of our frustrations with CDC, etc.  Keeping this testing requirement before being able to return home serves as a huge "hang up" on our part in being shy for wanting to book and travel overseas, especially on a cruise.  Who wants to get "stuck" for ten days or two weeks in a foreign country thousands of miles from home because you get an unfavorable test?  Am I being unfair and/or missing something major?

 

Full story at:

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/05/19/travel/testing-requirement-flying-us-cdc.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Dubrovnik!  Nice visual samples, tips, details, etc., for this super scenic and historic location. Over 48,701 views.    

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1439227

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are definitely not being unfair Terry. I understand that for our July Alaska cruise we will need to find somewhere in Vancouver (where we are going for 5 days before the cruise) to take a PCR test before we get onto the cruise ship. I sincerely trust that is it - when we land in Seward we are in to the USA, and with onward flights to Kodiak then Seattle no further test is necessary? Unless you all know different? I am crossing all fingers and toes this goes by mid-July, though you are very clear at the moment that the powers that be don't want to stop it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, TLCOhio said:

Am I being unfair and/or missing something major?

 

 

You are not being unfair and your post reflects my thinking about traveling.  

 

Missing something major?  The slowness of response by our Federal government has been detailed in the first chapter of our Country's response to Covid.  In a new book that could be titled "where's the baby formula?", we are witnessing a repeat performance only this time by the FDA.  The bureaucracy for both the CDC and the FDA has become too large to properly do their job.  

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/21/2022 at 3:51 PM, rkacruiser said:

You are not being unfair and your post reflects my thinking about traveling.  Missing something major?  The slowness of response by our Federal government has been detailed in the first chapter of our Country's response to Covid.  In a new book that could be titled "where's the baby formula?", we are witnessing a repeat performance only this time by the FDA.  The bureaucracy for both the CDC and the FDA has become too large to properly do their job.  

 

Appreciate this follow-up, including the appropriate focus on the bureaucratic slowness with the CDC, FDA, etc.  When leadership is needed, do not expect bureaucrats to be strong and aggressive.  Slowness tends to be their pattern.  Cover their you know what is their game?   Sad, but true!!??

 

From the Wall Street Journal last month, they had this headline: The 10 Busiest Airports in the World: Atlanta Tops the List" with this sub-headline: "Global travel continues to improve but still hasn’t returned to prepandemic levels; here’s the list of the busiest airports globally.

 

Why is this of interest and related to getting the cruise industry back into a full-speed resuming of "normal"?  Without international flights being back, reasonably priced, etc., cruising will continue to be challenged.  Right or wrong?

 

Here are some of their story highlights:Atlanta is back on top as the busiest airport in the world after dropping one spot last year as global air travel continues its rebound from the Covid-19 pandemic.  There were nearly 4.5 billion global flight passengers in 2021, an increase of nearly 25% from the prior year, according to figures released Monday by Airports Council International World, an industry group. However, that is still down about 50% from 2019.  The world’s 10 busiest airports, which represent about 10% of all global traffic, transported 463 million passengers in 2021, a 52% increase from 2020, according to ACI World. That is a 29% drop off from 2019.

 

Here is more from their reporting: "None of the top 10 airports last year have returned to prepandemic levels.  Flight traffic has improved as nations around the world have relaxed Covid-19 travel restrictions such as testing and vaccination rules. Australia began allowing fully vaccinated visitors into the country without quarantining in February.  Dubai International Airport remained the top destination for global travelers in 2021. The airport has 29 million international passengers in 2021, a 13% increase from the year before, but is still down 66% from 2019."

 

Here was the world's 2021 top ten airport rankings with the passenger totals in millions listed second.  Next is the % change in numbers versus 2019 levels: 
Atlanta, Ga., 75.7 million,  -32%; Dallas/Forth Worth, TX 62.5 million,  -17%; Denver, Co., 58.8 million, -15%; Chicago, Il., 54.0 million, -36%; Los Angeles, 48.0 million, -46%; Charlotte, 43.3 million,  -13%; Orlando, 40.4  million, -20%; Guangzhou, China, 40.3 million, -45%; Chengdu, China, 40.1 million, -28%; Las Vegas, 39.8 million, -23%. 

 

Full story at:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-10-busiest-airports-in-the-world-atlanta-tops-the-list-11649716699?mod=hp_user_preferences_pos1#cxrecs_s

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Athens & Greece: Many visuals, details from two visits in a city with great history, culture and architecture.  Now at 44,549 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1101008

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Many pax still do not want to book air travel back to 2019 baselines , with or without cruises, given how much more unreliable  and uncomfortable it has become (on top of what was already unreliable and uncomfortable)  even in business (frequent delays and missed connections, cancellations, crowds, not uncommon bullying by power-happy security agents, ongoing mask requirements for overseas travel  (and on some airlines like Lufthansa they even have to be the tighter higher grade and thus more uncomfortable masks),  lack of on-board service beyond water and maybe a functional non-obstructed toilet you're supposed to be thankful for, broken IFE,  nonfunctional wifi, with "covid" as the excuse for all failures, etc.).  Everyone also keeps waiting for the other shoe to drop on omicron baaaaaa2.   etc., (maybe now even monkey pox?) and other government caprice and surprises, real or imagined. Airlines  have been slow to add back flights to decrease pax anxieties, much less to increase comfort levels, and some pax who are more put out by major discomforts due to health issues  (myself included) have been hesitant to book as much as we used to because the thought of it fills me with dread. So the vicious cycle continues.

 

In Frankfurt, I had a last minute gate change requiring an *extra mile* of walking, i.e., borderline sprinting required (making all my prior plans of getting to the gate early so I could relax useless).  And then I spent 45 minutes in line trying to *reboard* a *small* and half empty  luxury cruise ship after a port stop in Lisbon two days ago where for some reason security was extra tight and extra slow, i.e.,  that's how long it took to reboard just 150 mostly seniors  returning from a high end concert dressed in their finest.  Unlike in most of Europe airports (much less at cruise terminals ) pax there even had to take their belts and watches off, (on top of going through the usual xray machines) .  A frail nonagenerian had the teenage pimply-faced security agent bark at him to take his metal suspenders off, resulting in his very loose dress pants (perhaps he had a recent weight loss from cancer?) falling down.  His wife caught the southward bound trousers just as the passenger's drawers were getting exposed, and she worked hard to get  him to waddle through security without the suspenders there to help keep his pants up   (he also had a cane, and they were carrying some things as well, which did not make it easier ).

 

Though there can still be surprisingly refreshing flying experiences, indignity, delay and discomfort have become more the routine than the exception, and it's going to take a long time to get some  people away from doing land trips instead, or just staying home (especially  if home is relatively nice).

 

 

 

 

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Catlover54 said:

it's going to take a long time to get some  people away from doing land trips instead, or just staying home (especially  if home is relatively nice).

 

Thanks for an interesting post and I do agree with your above statement.  Traveling, at its best, can be a hassle even with the most meticulous planning.  We are still in the recovery stage where, I think, for many--including me--it is just too much of a gamble of how my trip is going to go.  I would never spend thousands of dollars in a casino.  Spending thousands of dollars on a trip that may be pleasant or not?  Travel remains too much of a gamble for me.

 

The travel industry, as a whole, is in a funk because of needing to have so many people laid off because of the pandemic.  All segments of the industry have reported much difficulty in hiring badly needed employees to return all of the industries back to their service levels pre-Covid.  The hotel and airline industry has recently noted an uptick in business travel.  Good news, but, until it returns to its previous levels, the news won't be as promising as hoped.

 

I wonder if there is going to be a "new normal" post-Covid for the entire travel industry.  If so, some parts of the industry are quite overbuilt.  Some parts are understaffed for the hardware that they own.  It's going to be an "interesting" journey into the future.  

 

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, rkacruiser said:.

 

I wonder if there is going to be a "new normal" post-Covid for the entire travel industry.  If so, some parts of the industry are quite overbuilt.  Some parts are understaffed for the hardware that they own.  It's going to be an "interesting" journey into the future.  

 

 

Interesting, yes comfortable and enjoyable……..   not so much. I so much hope I am wrong!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/24/2022 at 11:04 AM, Catlover54 said:

Though there can still be surprisingly refreshing flying experiences, indignity, delay and discomfort have become more the routine than the exception, and it's going to take a long time to get some  people away from doing land trips instead, or just staying home (especially  if home is relatively nice).

 

Appreciate these comments and follow-up from our California friend, plus Mr. Banjo and our SW Ohio neighbor.    

 

From the Wall Street Journal Tuesday morning, they had this headline: The No-Brainer Cruise Vacation Gets Tricky" with this sub-headline: "The major cruise lines are almost back to full service, but plenty of potential disruptions remain—even barnacles.

 

Here are some of their story highlights:Cruises are back in force, but pandemic-related problems haven’t gone away.  Major cruise lines either have returned their full fleets to service or are close to doing so. Most no longer require masks in public spaces, and many of the usual onshore activities are available once again.  But staffing challenges have caused some cruise lines to curtail onboard offerings or reduce capacity recently. Flight delays and cancellations have made just getting to the ship a hassle. And Covid-19 remains a potential disrupter.

 

Here is more from this reporting: "Like airlines, the cruise industry is also grappling with staffing. Carnival Cruise Line spokesman Chris Chiames said in an email that delays in processing work visas for many members of the company’s crew were 'the primary cause of pockets of staff shortages.' Because of these shortages, Carnival temporarily suspended dinner service at two specialty dining venues located onboard some of its fleet through June 30.  Covid outbreaks among crew members also remain a concern, especially as newer variants of the virus evade some protection offered by vaccines. The emergence of the Omicron variant last winter prompted multiple ports of call to turn ships away. Cruise lines can rearrange itineraries on short notice, creating problems for passengers who booked activities with third parties at the original ports. International cruises can get more complicated. Travelers must test negative to fly back to the U.S. Just a few days into a Viking River Cruises sailing from Budapest to Amsterdam, Elaine Morin tested positive for Covid. She and her husband were whisked off the ship the following day and brought to a hotel in Vienna.   The couple waited as Ms. Morin’s husband tested positive a few days after her. She says the cruise line gave the couple paperwork that told them to remain isolated, but a Viking coordinator asked them to leave their hotel multiple times to get Covid tests at a pharmacy in a nearby mall. The couple returned home to Virginia 10 days following Ms. Morin’s first positive test after spending roughly $315 to get certificates of recovery from a physician."

 

Full story at:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-no-brainer-cruise-vacation-gets-tricky-11653349445?mod=life_work_lead_pos5

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Lisbon, NWSpain, Bordeaux/Brittany: Live/blog, June 2017 from Portugal to France along scenic Atlantic Coast on the Silver Spirit.  Now at 32,318 views.  Many interesting pictures, details for history, food, culture, etc.:

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2511358

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

From the Points Guy travel website this morning, they had this headline: They dropped us at a hotel and left: What happened when I tested positive for COVID-19 at the end of my cruise with these highlights: 'Be careful what you wish for,' said a nurse from the medical center on Discovery Princess.  It was disembarkation morning, following an otherwise pleasant five-night cruise along the West Coast, and I woke up with the worst sore throat and earache I’ve had in years.The sailing concluded in Vancouver, where I was supposed to stay for three days before boarding a 10-night Alaska voyage with a different cruise line. Not wanting to spread my germs — and knowing I wouldn’t be cleared to sail on the subsequent cruise if I was sick — I wanted to know what I was dealing with just three hours before leaving the ship.

 

Here is more: "Long story short, my results were positive and, per Canada’s requirements, I had to isolate in a hotel room for 10 days before flying back to the U.S. But it’s an entirely different process for a passenger who tests positive on a sailing and doesn’t have enough time to complete mandatory isolation on board.  What follows is an account of the problems I encountered as I struggled to obtain crucial information that should have been easier to find on the ship and at the hotel. Cruise lines have had nearly a year to perfect the procedures for handling passengers who test positive for COVID-19, but what happened after my onboard test was anything but smooth sailing."

 

What follows was summarized as a "flurry of chaos."  For us, this is one of the major  "concerns" about when we will be sailing again.  What happens if you test positive for Covid during and/or at the end of your cruise as you seek to return home or continue your travel adventures??    This writer gives many, many details and specifics as to how confused was this situation.  Between the cruise ship and the shore officials, the process was very difficult and totally challenged.  Not fun????

 

Full story at:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/they-dropped-us-at-a-hotel-and-left-what-happened-when-i-tested-positive-for-covid-19-at-the-end-of-my-cruise/ar-AAXV6cu?ocid=BingNewsSearch  

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Panama Canal? Early 2017, Fort Lauderdale to San Francisco adventure through Panama Canal.  Our first stops in Colombia, Central America and Mexico, plus added time in the great Golden Gate City. Now at 31,299 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2465580

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

From CBS TV News this morning, they had this headline: More than 7,000 flights canceled worldwide over Memorial Day weekend with these highlights:The Memorial Day holiday weekend is proving a messy one for many airlines, with carriers canceling thousands of flights worldwide, including hundreds in the U.S. on Monday.  On Monday, 1,634 flights had been canceled as of 11:52 p.m. ET, according to flight tracking website FlightAware. That followed roughly 1,640 cancellations on Sunday, 1,500 on Saturday and 2,300 on Friday. More than 400 of Monday's cancellations involved aircraft scheduled to fly to or from U.S. cities.  Delta Air Lines canceled the most flights among major U.S. airlines, scratching 133 flights on Monday, or 4% of its operations, according to FlightAware. The carrier was forced to cancel more than 400 flights on Saturday and Sunday.  Delta announced on its website on Thursday that from July 1 to Aug. 7, it would reduce service by about 100 daily departures, primarily in parts of the U.S. and Latin America that Delta frequently serves.

 

Other news stories blame a portion of this situation on pilot and staffing shortages.  Clearly this challenged solution with scrubbed flights and soaring air fares add to the challenges as cruise lines and passengers seek a return to "normal".  Reactions?  

 

Full story at:

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/flights-cancelled-memorial-day-weekend-2022-travel/

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

From late 2018, see “Holy Lands, Egypt, Jordan, Oman, Dubai, Greece, etc.”, with many visuals, details and ideas for the historic and scenic Middle East. Now at 20,845 views.  Connect at:

www.boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/2607054-livenautica-greece-holy-lands-egypt-dubai-terrypix’s/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From Yahoo News and a Florida TV station yesterday, they had this headline: We made it’: Passengers return to Port Canaveral after cruise ship catches fire with these highlights:Nearly 2,500 cruise passengers returned to Port Canaveral after a fire broke out on their ship.  A cloud of smoke poured out of the Carnival Freedom while it was docked at Grand Turk on Thursday.  Channel 9 spoke to some of the passengers as they disembarked the Carnival Conquest at Port Canaveral’s Terminal 6 on Monday morning.  Some were ecstatic to spend two extra days on vacation while others were just happy to be back on American soil.  Channel 9 found out that Carnival Freedom’s next two cruises out of Port Canaveral on June 2 and June 6 have been canceled.  As for the passengers, they all received cruise cash to use while onboard and every passenger was awarded 50% off their next Carnival cruise.

 

Full story at:

https://news.yahoo.com/passengers-return-port-canaveral-cruise-092951242.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Summer 2019 Calgary, Jasper/Banff National Parks, Western Canada Rocky Mountaineer rail adventure, Vancouver, sailing up to Alaska on Silver Muse, post-cruise excursion to Denali, etc.  Many visuals and details from our first in these scenic areas!  Live/blog: 

https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/2682584-live-terryohio-silver-muse-alaska-canadarockies-pix’s/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, TLCOhio said:

From the Points Guy travel website this morning, they had this headline: They dropped us at a hotel and left: What happened when I tested positive for COVID-19 at the end of my cruise with these highlights: 'Be careful what you wish for,' said a nurse from the medical center on Discovery Princess.  It was disembarkation morning, following an otherwise pleasant five-night cruise along the West Coast, and I woke up with the worst sore throat and earache I’ve had in years.The sailing concluded in Vancouver, where I was supposed to stay for three days before boarding a 10-night Alaska voyage with a different cruise line. Not wanting to spread my germs — and knowing I wouldn’t be cleared to sail on the subsequent cruise if I was sick — I wanted to know what I was dealing with just three hours before leaving the ship.

 

Here is more: "Long story short, my results were positive and, per Canada’s requirements, I had to isolate in a hotel room for 10 days before flying back to the U.S. But it’s an entirely different process for a passenger who tests positive on a sailing and doesn’t have enough time to complete mandatory isolation on board.  What follows is an account of the problems I encountered as I struggled to obtain crucial information that should have been easier to find on the ship and at the hotel. Cruise lines have had nearly a year to perfect the procedures for handling passengers who test positive for COVID-19, but what happened after my onboard test was anything but smooth sailing."

 

What follows was summarized as a "flurry of chaos."  For us, this is one of the major  "concerns" about when we will be sailing again.  What happens if you test positive for Covid during and/or at the end of your cruise as you seek to return home or continue your travel adventures??    This writer gives many, many details and specifics as to how confused was this situation.  Between the cruise ship and the shore officials, the process was very difficult and totally challenged.  Not fun????

 

Full story at:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/they-dropped-us-at-a-hotel-and-left-what-happened-when-i-tested-positive-for-covid-19-at-the-end-of-my-cruise/ar-AAXV6cu?ocid=BingNewsSearch  

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

 

Panama Canal? Early 2017, Fort Lauderdale to San Francisco adventure through Panama Canal.  Our first stops in Colombia, Central America and Mexico, plus added time in the great Golden Gate City. Now at 31,299 views.

http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=2465580

This is a disheartening story and well worth reading in full. It once again highlights how our government's policy of requiring a negative test to return to the USA after a trip overseas is causing tremendous hardship to its citizens with no benefit to anyone. LET THEM COME HOME ALREADY!!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • ANNOUNCEMENT: Experience more Co-op Holidays
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • Canadian Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...