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Aviator of the Seas

Carnival ship aground off San Juan Harbor?

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Someone didn’t want to leave Puerto Rico. Or someone said I’m running late hold the boat!

 

 

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Yeah, someone has some explaining to do.

Sounds crazy that an anchor can just "accidentally" fall. Will be interesting to hear the actual account.

 

This is a post from someone else on FB.

 

I’m on the ship also and I believe the captain said that the anchor accidentally came down as we were off the shore. He didn’t say we forgot to pull it up or that it snapped and we can’t find it.

 

I recall reading about a passenger on a HAL ship who was charged with releasing an anchor. He had apparently wandered into a restricted area and decided to play with some controls. Alcohol was apparently involved.

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I recall reading about a passenger on a HAL ship who was charged with releasing an anchor. He had apparently wandered into a restricted area and decided to play with some controls. Alcohol was apparently involved.

 

 

 

I remember that, this is the cc article on that guy

 

he consumed three or four glasses of wine, a wine glass full of vodka, five single martinis, four double martinis, one-quarter of a two-liter bottle of Grey Goose vodka (that he stole from a closed bar) and an Ambien

 

https://www.cruisecritic.com/news/news.cfm?ID=4251

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How the heck does that happen? Isn't there a safety detent or something?

 

 

 

In the small boat world this actually happened more then you think. The windless can slip and if you don’t have the safety wire on it you can make a mess out of things.

 

 

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When a ship prepares to go into restricted waters (like into port), or get underway, the anchors are prepped for instant use in case of emergency, so all of the "safety devices" are removed, and the anchors are holding just on their brake bands. Sometimes, if the bands are not tightened enough, severe vibrations, like when a ship gets going too fast in shallow water (the propeller wake bounces off the bottom and vibrates the ship), the windlass brake band can slip, and the anchor fall under its weight to the sea bed. It's embarrassing, but it does happen.

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When a ship prepares to go into restricted waters (like into port), or get underway, the anchors are prepped for instant use in case of emergency, so all of the "safety devices" are removed, and the anchors are holding just on their brake bands. Sometimes, if the bands are not tightened enough, severe vibrations, like when a ship gets going too fast in shallow water (the propeller wake bounces off the bottom and vibrates the ship), the windlass brake band can slip, and the anchor fall under its weight to the sea bed. It's embarrassing, but it does happen.

 

Thanks the explanation! Makes a lot of sense now.

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When a ship prepares to go into restricted waters (like into port), or get underway, the anchors are prepped for instant use in case of emergency, so all of the "safety devices" are removed, and the anchors are holding just on their brake bands. Sometimes, if the bands are not tightened enough, severe vibrations, like when a ship gets going too fast in shallow water (the propeller wake bounces off the bottom and vibrates the ship), the windlass brake band can slip, and the anchor fall under its weight to the sea bed. It's embarrassing, but it does happen.

 

Thank you for the explanation. Very interesting and makes a lot of sense.

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Thank you for the explanation. Very interesting and makes a lot of sense.

 

Indeed, very good info. I have heard before that a ship cannot go into port with a missing anchor, and given this explanation... wondering if this will create issues until the anchor is replaced?

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The ship has two anchors, just for this reason. There is another one onboard already. Learned this on the Behind the Fun tour.

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It sounds like their anchor likely got fouled on the bottom, and couldn't be raised. They will then let out all the chain, and where the end link of the chain is fastened to the ship, there is a pin that can be driven out to let the chain free.

 

A ship can enter port with one anchor missing, but depending on the port, and country, they may need to make notifications and meet various requirements. For a US port, they will need to notify the USCG, but I don't recall their being any restrictions, like having additional tugs, for losing an anchor.

 

Most likely the company has a spare anchor for each class of ship, if the anchors are significantly different, and anchor chain is fairly easy to obtain. Probably a month or so to get everything staged to turn around port, and line up barges and cranes for installation.

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When a ship prepares to go into restricted waters (like into port), or get underway, the anchors are prepped for instant use in case of emergency, so all of the "safety devices" are removed, and the anchors are holding just on their brake bands. Sometimes, if the bands are not tightened enough, severe vibrations, like when a ship gets going too fast in shallow water (the propeller wake bounces off the bottom and vibrates the ship), the windlass brake band can slip, and the anchor fall under its weight to the sea bed. It's embarrassing, but it does happen.

 

Good info! Thanks!

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someone didn’t want to leave puerto rico. Or someone said i’m running late hold the boat!

 

 

Sent from my iphone using forums

 

:d:d

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It sounds like their anchor likely got fouled on the bottom, and couldn't be raised. They will then let out all the chain, and where the end link of the chain is fastened to the ship, there is a pin that can be driven out to let the chain free.

 

A ship can enter port with one anchor missing, but depending on the port, and country, they may need to make notifications and meet various requirements. For a US port, they will need to notify the USCG, but I don't recall their being any restrictions, like having additional tugs, for losing an anchor.

 

Most likely the company has a spare anchor for each class of ship, if the anchors are significantly different, and anchor chain is fairly easy to obtain. Probably a month or so to get everything staged to turn around port, and line up barges and cranes for installation.

 

Non sequitor, but I'm curious on how much chain a ship of that size holds.

 

And I can imagine that a stateroom near the chain locker must be noisy when they drop an anchor.

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Non sequitor, but I'm curious on how much chain a ship of that size holds.

 

And I can imagine that a stateroom near the chain locker must be noisy when they drop an anchor.

 

Anchor chain is measured in "shots" (each shot being 15 fathoms, or 90 feet). I would say the typical cruise ship carries 12 shots on each anchor (1080 feet). Yes, anchoring and maneuvering with the thrusters can get noisy for lower deck, forward cabins, which is why the ones really close to the chain lockers are crew cabins.

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I know from a recent Carnival BtF Tour that some ships carry a spare anchor on the bow near the ship's bell, but it would require a heavy-duty crane at a port to haul it up. It was either on the Vista or the Conquest where it was pointed out to us; if the latter, then Glory should also have one available.

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How the heck does that happen? Isn't there a safety detent or something?

Usually, weight of chain holds ship, and anchor just holds chain. To retrieve anchor, ship rides up on top of it and reels it in. If it got stuck in a reef, it may be problem, but ships have spare anchor in case one is lost.

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I know from a recent Carnival BtF Tour that some ships carry a spare anchor on the bow near the ship's bell, but it would require a heavy-duty crane at a port to haul it up. It was either on the Vista or the Conquest where it was pointed out to us; if the latter, then Glory should also have one available.

 

Is there spare chain?

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Is there spare chain?

 

No. But new chain is typically more available than a large anchor.

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The Triumph lost and anchor in Galveston one NYE cruise. We sailed late because of that.

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Getting on this boat Saturday. I can bring my anchor off my bay boat.

 

I’ll bring one too. It might hold, but that’d be a fluke...

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Just spoke with the Captain.

 

He said “$*%#*#*%” & %*$/#*=*#$$&()(&”

 

Also, “Hold my beer.”

 

 

This made me laugh! Lol.

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I’ll bring one too. It might hold, but that’d be a fluke...

 

 

 

+5

 

 

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I know from a recent Carnival BtF Tour that some ships carry a spare anchor on the bow near the ship's bell, but it would require a heavy-duty crane at a port to haul it up. It was either on the Vista or the Conquest where it was pointed out to us; if the latter, then Glory should also have one available.

 

I believe you are referring to a spare propeller. This is found and stored on the bow of the ship near the bell & crew rec area.

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+5

Took a Floridian to get that. I wanted to say "Danforth and conquer" but...

 

Enjoyed your states weather a couple of weeks ago, my girls ran the half-marathon at Disney.

 

Tight lines to ya. Caught a nice flounder and speckled trout off the pier tonight. Chartreuse Gulp and 3/8 jig slow rolling.

 

.

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I believe you are referring to a spare propeller. This is found and stored on the bow of the ship near the bell & crew rec area.

 

Some ships carry a spare propeller, some a set of propeller blades, if they use a variable pitch propeller, and some carry spare anchors.

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Wow lol I was on the ship. It really wasn’t as bad as everyone makes it sound. The only way we were affected was that we arrived in Grand Turk a couple hours late but they let us stay late so we got all of our time there. The captain kept in constant contact with the guests informing them of any updates. Other than that, It was business as usual. We were told by the cruise director that it was a mechanical error that caused the anchor to release, it was not human error.

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I believe you are referring to a spare propeller. This is found and stored on the bow of the ship near the bell & crew rec area.

 

No, it was clearly a spare anchor. We were informed it weighed around ten+ tons. That's a tad excessive for a prop.

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No, it was clearly a spare anchor. We were informed it weighed around ten+ tons. That's a tad excessive for a prop.

 

Well, the relatively small propeller on my tanker weighs 17 tons. Even the Titanic's propellers were 38 tons each, and the largest propellers in the world, on the Emma Maersk and her sister ships of the Maersk Lines E-class container ships, weigh in at a whopping 131 tons. Most cruise ship propellers are in the 30-40 ton range.

 

But I do agree with you that some ships carry spare anchors.

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C_Glory_bow_above.jpgPictures don’t lie. The glory has a spare anchor just forward of the crew hot tubs. There is also a spare anchor chain stored in the aft of the ship.used to work on the conquest class seen it first hand

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Given the configuration of the Conquest class aft mooring stations, I don't think they are storing a spare anchor chain there. A pile of 1000' of anchor chain takes up quite a lot of space. What I think you saw was a short (60' or so) length of chain that is part of the emergency towing arrangement required on all vessels. This chain is much more resistant to chafing and wear than a mooring line or wire, and in emergency towing situations the angle the line takes from the ship to the towing vessel can vary widely and not be optimum, so they use a short length of chain at the ship, and shackle this to a towing wire or synthetic line.

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Wow lol I was on the ship. It really wasn’t as bad as everyone makes it sound. The only way we were affected was that we arrived in Grand Turk a couple hours late but they let us stay late so we got all of our time there. The captain kept in constant contact with the guests informing them of any updates. Other than that, It was business as usual. We were told by the cruise director that it was a mechanical error that caused the anchor to release, it was not human error.

 

I was also on this cruise and it did cause a bit of excitement - after leaving San Juan harbour and heading out to sea, all of a sudden noted more 'rocking' and then not moving? Captain did come on to explain the situation - did not sound too serious or that we were in any danger.

 

We just sat there rocking and rolling -and to be quite honest the cruise itself was a bit rocky and this was not as bad as some of the rough seas we had already experienced LOL.

 

We were 'stuck' for over 4 hours and things on the ship were going on as usual (dinner/comedy club/etc)...and we finally started moving after 8:30 pm - with as mentioned an adjusted stop in Grand Turk (1:30 to 7 pm)....

 

Glad it went smoothly and that everyone was safe and sound!

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Sorry for the confusion on my last post. Spirit class and two fantasy class carry spare propellers - Conquest is the anchor.

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Sorry for the confusion on my last post. Spirit class and two fantasy class carry spare propellers - Conquest is the anchor.

 

It would make perfect sense for large ships to carry both as spares. I'm sure that neither are off-the-shelf parts. Without spares on board, loss or damage could render the ship out of service for months.

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Well, the relatively small propeller on my tanker weighs 17 tons. Even the Titanic's propellers were 38 tons each, and the largest propellers in the world, on the Emma Maersk and her sister ships of the Maersk Lines E-class container ships, weigh in at a whopping 131 tons. Most cruise ship propellers are in the 30-40 ton range.

Wow, I stand corrected, in a big way. :)

But I do agree with you that some ships carry spare anchors.

It was indeed in the same spot as in the photo of Glory, below. Just abaft the ship's bell and forward of the crew hot tubs....which seldom seem to be working whenever I see them. :)

 

C_Glory_bow_above.jpg

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