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39 minutes ago, terrydtx said:

To make it simple,  just get a passport with your legal current name. I have never seen so many people argue against having a current passport, just unbelievable. 

 

I have a passport. I was asking a theoretical question. (see post 43)

 

I don't understand why people don't just get a passport. Yes, it's $100, but compared to the cost of taking a cruise it's a minor expense.

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According to the DHS the ONLY states with the EDL (enhanced drivers licenses) are quoted below.

 

"Enhanced driver's licenses are available to U.S. citizens who reside in the states of Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Vermont, and Washington." 

 

A star on your drivers license from any other state other than those above is not an EDL version and will not be accepted in lieu of a required passport.

 

If you have any questions about what HAL will require on your Alaska cruise I suggest you contact HAL directly as they are the ones who will have the final say about whether you will or will not be allowed to board your cruise and what documents will be required.

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My question is: 

 

Assuming a passenger is cruising May 10-17 and the passenger's passport expires a month later, say June 15:   Would HAL deny boarding for a 7-day closed-loop Alaska cruise for this passenger?   An expiration date on passport of  six months post-cruise is "highly recommended" by HAL.   Canada's entry requirement for US citizens is a "US Passport valid on the date of entry" (according to state.gov).

 

There is not a requirement on the part of Canada that a US passport is valid for 6 months after entry,  although some other countries have different requirements of course.   But what exactly is HAL's passport policy?   

Is it that a passenger has the documents to meet the requirements of US law and the laws of the countries one visits?  Or does HAL now have a more restrictive policy requiring a passport that does not expire until 6 months after the cruise?   

 

Asking for a friend!

 

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On 3/24/2019 at 12:15 PM, 3rdGenCunarder said:

I read over the info about the closed-loop requirements. I use my passport, so this question is strictly theoretical. My birth certificate has my maiden name on it. My drivers licence has my married name. Would a mismatch like that cause a problem?

 

theoretically speaking:  I would bring a copy of marriage certificate just to be safe, because who knows what could happen at the border if you don't have matching docs?

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I just don't understand people spending thousands for a cruise (cabin cost plus onboard expenses) and still refuse to apply for a 10 year passport for $110.   And the one post about an uncle wanted only a passport card, not the full book is insane.   The cost of the full passport is only a little more, and you still have to do the same application process.    Just because you are young, healthy and on a closed loop cruise, there's always the possibility that you could miss the ship,  break a bone or some other medical issue, or fall asleep on the beach and have to fly home.   Why take a whole file cabinet of paperwork (birth certificates, marriage licenses, questionable driver's licenses, etc) when a simple passport book is all you need ?

Edited by TAD2005

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26 minutes ago, TAD2005 said:

I just don't understand people spending thousands for a cruise (cabin cost plus onboard expenses) and still refuse to apply for a 10 year passport for $110.   And the one post about an uncle wanted only a passport card, not the full book is insane.   The cost of the full passport is only a little more, and you still have to do the same application process.    Just because you are young, healthy and on a closed loop cruise, there's always the possibility that you could miss the ship,  break a bone or some other medical issue, or fall asleep on the beach and have to fly home.   Why take a whole file cabinet of paperwork (birth certificates, marriage licenses, questionable driver's licenses, etc) when a simple passport book is all you need ?

Not to disagree, but to update your information...."According to the U.S. Department of State, passport “execution fees” will increase from $25 to $35 starting April 2, 2018. The fee change will bump the total cost of a U.S. passport to $145 for adults and $115 for children 16 and younger."

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2 hours ago, delphis98 said:

 

My question is: 

 

Assuming a passenger is cruising May 10-17 and the passenger's passport expires a month later, say June 15:   Would HAL deny boarding for a 7-day closed-loop Alaska cruise for this passenger?   An expiration date on passport of  six months post-cruise is "highly recommended" by HAL.   Canada's entry requirement for US citizens is a "US Passport valid on the date of entry" (according to state.gov).

 

There is not a requirement on the part of Canada that a US passport is valid for 6 months after entry,  although some other countries have different requirements of course.   But what exactly is HAL's passport policy?   

Is it that a passenger has the documents to meet the requirements of US law and the laws of the countries one visits?  Or does HAL now have a more restrictive policy requiring a passport that does not expire until 6 months after the cruise?   

 

Asking for a friend!

 

On a New England - Canada cruise originating in Boston, we were refused embarkation using our NEXUS cards although they were valid for marine entry to Canada. Fortunately, we had our passports with us. The year before, we had no problem with the same cards for a Canada-Alaska return cruise on HAL. Go figure. All that to say that, whatever the two governments might deem sufficient, it's the terminal staff that make the decision on whether you satisfy their requirements. This is one case where I would strongly suggest contacting HAL directly and determining their policy.

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3 minutes ago, Fouremco said:

On a New England - Canada cruise originating in Boston, we were refused embarkation using our NEXUS cards although they were valid for marine entry to Canada. Fortunately, we had our passports with us. The year before, we had no problem with the same cards for a Canada-Alaska return cruise on HAL. Go figure. All that to say that, whatever the two governments might deem sufficient, it's the terminal staff that make the decision on whether you satisfy their requirements. This is one case where I would strongly suggest contacting HAL directly and determining their policy.

 

And get it in writing, in case the terminal staff don't take your word for it.

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My question is: 

 

Assuming a passenger is cruising May 10-17 and the passenger's passport expires a month later, say June 15:   Would HAL deny boarding for a 7-day closed-loop Alaska cruise for this passenger?   An expiration date on passport of  six months post-cruise is "highly recommended" by HAL.   Canada's entry requirement for US citizens is a "US Passport valid on the date of entry" (according to state.gov).

 

There is not a requirement on the part of Canada that a US passport is valid for 6 months after entry,  although some other countries have different requirements of course.   But what exactly is HAL's passport policy?   

Is it that a passenger has the documents to meet the requirements of US law and the laws of the countries one visits?  Or does HAL now have a more restrictive policy requiring a passport that does not expire until 6 months after the cruise?   

 

Asking for a friend!

 

 

The friend won’t have any problem. The friend has a valid passport. Closed loop or not does not matter. HAL is not going to deny boarding.

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It's a closed loop domestic WHTI voyage - you'll be fine to board with a certified copy of your birth certificate and a driver's license.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

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4 hours ago, delphis98 said:

There is not a requirement on the part of Canada that a US passport is valid for 6 months after entry,  although some other countries have different requirements of course.   But what exactly is HAL's passport policy?  

 

I did a closed-loop in February on a passport that expires in May, and the passport of the person who was with me expires in April, so less than 3 months from expiry on each.  Not a word was said by anyone who checked it at HAL. 

 

In my case, it was an Eastern Caribbean itinerary that included Grand Turk, and they only require a passport valid on the date of entry, too.  Just keep in mind that the passport must also be valid until the date of intended departure, too.  If they have the other acceptable documents for arrival by sea, it wouldn't hurt to bring them.

 

Wouldn't hurt to double-check directly with the airline if you're flying to the US, either.

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1 hour ago, likeadisguise said:

It's a closed loop domestic WHTI voyage - you'll be fine to board with a certified copy of your birth certificate and a driver's license.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

 

Yes.  Just tell them “likeadisguise” on Cruise Critic says it’s fine and they’ll let you board.  🙄

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Yes.  Just tell them “likeadisguise” on Cruise Critic says it’s fine and they’ll let you board.  
You're right, they probably put it on their website as a joke!

U.S. citizens on U.S. roundtrip or "closed-loop" cruises: U.S. citizens who board a cruise ship at a port within the United States, travel only within the Western Hemisphere, and return to the same U.S. port on the same ship may present a valid US passport, U.S. Passport Card, Enhanced Driver's License or Trusted Traveler Program Card such as Nexus, Sentri or Fast Cards.
However, in the absence of any of the documentation listed above, U.S. citizens can present a government issued photo ID, along with proof of citizenship (an original or copy of his or her government issued birth certificate, a Consular report of Birth Abroad, or a Certificate of Naturalization). A passport is still the preferred document.


Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

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On February 24, 2019 at 2:06 PM, terrydtx said:

In 2017 we did a charter sailboat trip in the BVI. We flew in and out of St. Thomas and a water taxi to Tortola. The BVI  required a passport to enter and it was needed after we took the water taxi back to St. Thomas. There was a couple on the water taxi trying to enter Tortola without a passport and They were sent back to St. Thomas. Thats why we never leave US without a passport. 

 

As noted earlier if you do an Alaska cruise from Vancouver and fly there you will need a passport at the Vancouver Airport.

Couldn't agree more, I never leave home without a passport, just in case.

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7 hours ago, likeadisguise said:

You're right, they probably put it on their website as a joke!

U.S. citizens on U.S. roundtrip or "closed-loop" cruises: U.S. citizens who board a cruise ship at a port within the United States, travel only within the Western Hemisphere, and return to the same U.S. port on the same ship may present a valid US passport, U.S. Passport Card, Enhanced Driver's License or Trusted Traveler Program Card such as Nexus, Sentri or Fast Cards.
However, in the absence of any of the documentation listed above, U.S. citizens can present a government issued photo ID, along with proof of citizenship (an original or copy of his or her government issued birth certificate, a Consular report of Birth Abroad, or a Certificate of Naturalization). A passport is still the preferred document.


Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

 

Trust me, I know all about WHTI-approved documents and policy.  What they don’t tell you is that the CBP/CBSA Officers and the ship/airline gatekeepers have the final word and there is nothing you can do except argue your point as you watch your plane, train, automobile, bus, or ship disappear into the distance.

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18 minutes ago, *Miss G* said:

 

Trust me, I know all about WHTI-approved documents and policy.  What they don’t tell you is that the CBP/CBSA Officers and the ship/airline gatekeepers have the final word and there is nothing you can do except argue your point as you watch your plane, train, automobile, bus, or ship disappear into the distance.

 

I am VERY risk-averse, and I am firmly convinced that if I chance it on less than six months on my passport, I will run into the picky person who will check the date and say NO. Just not worth it to take that chance. First thing I do after I book a cruise is check the expiration date on my passport.

 

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3 minutes ago, 3rdGenCunarder said:

 

I am VERY risk-averse, and I am firmly convinced that if I chance it on less than six months on my passport, I will run into the picky person who will check the date and say NO. Just not worth it to take that chance. First thing I do after I book a cruise is check the expiration date on my passport.

 

I am reminded of two things.

1. I learned at a very young age that if your plans don't allow for things to go wrong, they always will. In this case, my luck would be that the official would be picky if I tried to push it. That is why I just renewed my passport because the old one wouldn't have had 6 months after my upcoming Alaska cruise. It is also why I took my BC along just in case it was asked for. I didn't expect to be asked, but much easier to have and not need than need and not have.

2. On the Voyage of the Vikings an Irish immigration official joined the ship and did a passport check on the sea day prior to stopping in Ireland. In line it looked like he was just glancing at the passport. When he looked at mine he told me to remember to renew it this year. People used to looking at a certain document don't take long at all to find the information they need.

 

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11 hours ago, likeadisguise said:

It's a closed loop domestic WHTI voyage - you'll be fine to board with a certified copy of your birth certificate and a driver's license.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

 


 

Actually, my friend called HAL and the phone agent said what likeadisguise said in this post.  But I seriously don't think that's correct, even thought the HAL phone agent said it was okay,   because the issue is not returning to the US, which is fine with birth cert and drivers license on a closed loop cruise.  The problem would be that there is a stop in a Canadian port, which does not allow entry without a valid US passport (or passport card if arriving only by land or sea).  If a person doesn't have a valid US passport, passport card,  Canada won't let them in.   A passport card will not be good enough for a cruise tour with a flight portion in Canada, either.   Anything involving flights in Canada requires a passport book with at least one blank page.   My friend's question was about what HAL's actual policy is--whether it is a more restrictive policy than the Canadian gvt.   It's too late for my friend to safely renew his passport by mail, even with expediting, because it could always take a few days longer than expected, get lost in the mail, etc.   He might go to the passport agency within 2 weeks of the cruise, but it's a long drive and a day or two extra to be taken off work,  so a lot of expense and bother if HAL is fine with a valid passport expiring a month after the cruise.  

35 minutes ago, *Miss G* said:

 

Trust me, I know all about WHTI-approved documents and policy.  What they don’t tell you is that the CBP/CBSA Officers and the ship/airline gatekeepers have the final word and there is nothing you can do except argue your point as you watch your plane, train, automobile, bus, or ship disappear into the distance.

 

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13 hours ago, Charles4515 said:

The friend won’t have any problem. The friend has a valid passport. Closed loop or not does not matter. HAL is not going to deny boarding.

Charles4515, thanks!  So no need to rush into the expediting passport agency to renew it early?  You seem very knowledgeable, I looked at a few of your recent posts, you must travel the world a lot!    Here is my next question for you, because that's what happens when you answer questions for people, they ask more, lol! : 

Do you think it is correct to say that the certified birth certificate and drivers license cannot work on HAL

closed loop Alaska cruises, beginning and ending in Seattle because of the stop in Victoria?  

thank you.

 

 

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Just as an FYI, this short answer to a FAQ on the US State Dept.'s cruise ship passengers page:

 

Q: I am taking a cruise.  Do I need a passport?

A: We recommend that everyone taking a cruise from the United States have a passport book. Though some “closed-loop” cruises may not require a U.S. passport, we recommend bringing yours in case of an emergency, such as an unexpected medical air evacuation or the ship docking at an alternate port. Also, your cruise company may require you to have a passport, even if U.S. Customs and Border Protection does not.

 

The cruise line or other transporter can require a passport even if the CBP doesn't.  You might argue the point, just don't expect to win.  Source

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, delphis98 said:

Charles4515, thanks!  So no need to rush into the expediting passport agency to renew it early?  You seem very knowledgeable, I looked at a few of your recent posts, you must travel the world a lot!    Here is my next question for you, because that's what happens when you answer questions for people, they ask more, lol! : 

Do you think it is correct to say that the certified birth certificate and drivers license cannot work on HAL

closed loop Alaska cruises, beginning and ending in Seattle because of the stop in Victoria?  

thank you.

 

 

 

No need to rush into expiditing to renew early. For the US and Canada only a valid passport is required.

 

A birth certificate and drivers license are good on HAL closed loop Alaska cruises. Victoria does not matter. In fact all closed loop cruises from US ports have to stop at a foriegn port. On cruises from Seattle the foreign port is Victoria. 

 

The lady who asked about her Uncle was not on a closed loop cruise. The cruisetour was roundtrip but the cruise portion was one way from Alaska to Vancouver. Her Uncle needs a passport. She never came back so I hope she understands that HAL won't let her Uncle board without a passport. 

Edited by Charles4515

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1 hour ago, 0bnxshs said:

 

The cruise line or other transporter can require a passport even if the CBP doesn't.  You might argue the point, just don't expect to win.  Source

 

They won't require a passport on a western hemisphere closed loop cruise unless there is a country that requires a passport. For instance Cuba. The reason why birth certificates and drivers licenses are permitted on closed loop cruises under the WHTI is that the cruise lines lobbied heavily for this provision since many Americans don't have passports, and the cruise lines feared losing business if passports are required. So the cruise lines is not going to require a passport if the CBP does not. 

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12 minutes ago, Charles4515 said:

Thank you 🙂 that's helpful to know!   Last question--when a person traveling on a birth certificate and DL wants to get off the ship in Victoria, will they be allowed by the Canadians to debark and wander around Victoria?  just curious!

thanks again!

 

 

 

No need to rush into expiditing to renew early. For the US and Canada only a valid passport is required.

 

A birth certificate and drivers license are good on HAL closed loop Alaska cruises. Victoria does not matter. In fact all closed loop cruises from US ports have to stop at a foriegn port. On cruises from Seattle the foreign port is Victoria. 

 

The lady who asked about her Uncle was not on a closed loop cruise. The cruisetour was roundtrip but the cruise portion was one way from Alaska to Vancouver. Her Uncle needs a passport. She never came back so I hope she understands that HAL won't let her Uncle board without a passport. 

 

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Last question--when a person traveling on a birth certificate and DL wants to get off the ship in Victoria, will they be allowed by the Canadians to debark and wander around Victoria? just curious!
thanks again!



They will be allowed to get off.

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A lot of advice on this post is to call HAL and ask them.   Experienced CC cruisers clearly know that the advice you get from a HAL Seattle agent and $5 will get you a cup of coffee.   The ONLY opinion that really matters is the boarding agent in the embarkation port.   If they think you need a passport, and all you have is a bunch of paperwork and a driver's license, you aren't going to be cruising.   You can argue all day with them, and maybe you might get lucky, and maybe you won't.  The only way to guarantee you will cruise is to have a passport.

 

 

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