Jump to content

Any news from the Amsterdam?


mame42
 Share

Recommended Posts

5 hours ago, rafinmd said:

Do we know why Amsterdam is trying to get to Singapore or Port Klang?  I think Serenity is doing pretty much the same thing as the ships at Grand Bahama Anchorage are doing and Amsterdam might not have a problem there.

 

She has rounded the tip of Sumatra Island and is hopefully on the way to Malacca Strait.

 

Roy

 

According to crew onboard, Singapore has now denied the request to call there for pratique so they are looking for alternatives; Port Klang, Malaysia (24 miles southwest of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia's capital) is one of the options. 

 

Getting Around - Ports of Call - Malaysia

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Sir PMP said:

Why not directly to Tanjung Priok?

 

From Herr Kaptän M:

 

"In a rough Indian Ocean, still making our way towards the Malacca Straits, making 15 knots, except now our first port will be Singapore on the 24th.  This to take fuel.  To be able to so, we have to be at sea for 14 days, so had we gone to Batam first, the ‘clock starts over’ again and we would have to wait another 14 days……"

 

Me thinks they prefer Singaporean or Malaysian fuel over Indonesian...............

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Copper10-8 said:

 

From Herr Kaptän M:

 

"In a rough Indian Ocean, still making our way towards the Malacca Straits, making 15 knots, except now our first port will be Singapore on the 24th.  This to take fuel.  To be able to so, we have to be at sea for 14 days, so had we gone to Batam first, the ‘clock starts over’ again and we would have to wait another 14 days……"

 

Me thinks they prefer Singaporean or Malaysian fuel over Indonesian...............

Thanks.  That makes sense from Amsterdam's point of view.  I'm having a little trouble understanding the reluctance of the ports to give such minimal help.  How much contact is needed to bring a bunker barge alongside a ship at anchor and refuel it?  That's how QM2 got fuel both in Port Klang and in Mauritius.

 

Roy

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, rafinmd said:

Do we know why Amsterdam is trying to get to Singapore or Port Klang?  I think Serenity is doing pretty much the same thing as the ships at Grand Bahama Anchorage are doing and Amsterdam might not have a problem there.

 

She has rounded the tip of Sumatra Island and is hopefully on the way to Malacca Strait.

 

Roy

The reason Singapore doesn’t want the Amsterdam is that the Coronavirus cases has doubled recently. This was posted on Philip Stolte’s blog. I checked and they are correct. Singapore thought they had it under control and it recently came back with a vengeance.

 

As to why they are trying to get to either port is for fuel and provisions according to Captain Jonathan. I suspects that he feels he won’t be able to dock immediately in Indonesia so he want to be prepared. Plus, it was a long haul from Durban. Good thing we weren’t onboard.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

51 minutes ago, rafinmd said:

Amsterdam is back on terrestrial AIS with a reported destination of Port Klang on 23 April.  I have an optimistic hunch about her chances for refueling.

 

Roy

 

Looks like the 405 (San Diego Freeway) around LAX during rush hour out there. Hope they have a carpool lane out there 😉

 

https://www.vesselfinder.com/?imo=9188037

Edited by Copper10-8
  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In Malacca Straits south of Amsterdam, is Radiance otS. anchored NW of Port Klang.  She came up from Australia & took bunkers at Singapore & then moved to her present position several days ago.

There are currently eight cruise ships anchored off Manila port - Sun, Sea, Sapphire & Majestic Princesses. Queen Elizabeth, Pacific Dawn & Explorer, & Voyager otS.  All these came up from Australia.

Amsterdam should not have any problem getting bunkers at Singapore - it is the largest bunker port on the world & nearly all merchant ships are still operating.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Himself said:

I is fine.  Buick Envision and it is white.

 

Good choice, Father.  Mine is a 2020 Buick Envision with the Dark Moon Blue Metallic with the gray interior color.  The Dark Moon Blue is so dark that on a cloudy day, the car looks Black.  But, in the sunshine, it is a beautiful very dark Blue.  I have the 240 hp turbo engine AWD and I am still learning how to control the speed that I get out of that engine.  I am absolutely amazed that a 4 cylinder engine can produce such hp and torque.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Malacca & Singapore Straits has the longest 263 nm Traffic Separation Scheme [TSS] in the world.  There are no pilots.

It has 2 way traffic with a max depth eastbound of 23 metres.  The nightmare starts at One Fathom Bank due west of Port Klang & 263 nm later ends at Horsborough Lighthouse at eastern end of Singapore Straits.

Large deep draft crude oil tankers - VLCC - have some priority at the Singapore end that gives then some right of way over crossing traffic & they are required to travel no faster than 12 knots. Watches on the better operated ships are often doubled with 2 deck officers doing 6 on/6 off with master taking the hectic section around Singapore where a tanker drawing 21 metres has to pass a rock a certain distance off & still keep in the traffic lanes.  There are regular reporting places & the whole area is under radar control.  Here the Radio Officer was used for comms. with VTIS.

Photo of VLCC Golden Stream, 275,616 dwt, 144149 gt, draft 20.4 metres [66.9ft]. 

Later was 4 months on her bigger fleet sister Golden Fountain 301,665 dwt. & she had a max draft of 22.213m which is too deep for this TSS.

1-One Fathom Bank Lighthouse, Malacca Straits.png

2-Malacca Straits chart.jpg

3-Golden Stream to 18th Mar. 2006 20 m.jpg

4-Horsburgh lt..jpg

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, SeaDog-46 said:

Malacca & Singapore Straits has the longest 263 nm Traffic Separation Scheme [TSS] in the world.  There are no pilots.

It has 2 way traffic with a max depth eastbound of 23 metres.  The nightmare starts at One Fathom Bank due west of Port Klang & 263 nm later ends at Horsborough Lighthouse at eastern end of Singapore Straits.

Large deep draft crude oil tankers - VLCC - have some priority at the Singapore end that gives then some right of way over crossing traffic & they are required to travel no faster than 12 knots. Watches on the better operated ships are often doubled with 2 deck officers doing 6 on/6 off with master taking the hectic section around Singapore where a tanker drawing 21 metres has to pass a rock a certain distance off & still keep in the traffic lanes.  There are regular reporting places & the whole area is under radar control.  Here the Radio Officer was used for comms. with VTIS.

Photo of VLCC Golden Stream, 275,616 dwt, 144149 gt, draft 20.4 metres [66.9ft]. 

Later was 4 months on her bigger fleet sister Golden Fountain 301,665 dwt. & she had a max draft of 22.213m which is too deep for this TSS.

1-One Fathom Bank Lighthouse, Malacca Straits.png

2-Malacca Straits chart.jpg

3-Golden Stream to 18th Mar. 2006 20 m.jpg

4-Horsburgh lt..jpg

 

Thanks for the expertise, Sir!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A bit of trivia: The Straits of Malacca is also the world's most dangerous passage in terms of sea piracy (more than the coast of Somalia). While the numbers have come down (in 2015) due to the increased patrol from the navies of Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand, pirates (from the unnamed country in the list) still frequent the straits and target oil tankers and cargo ships. Numbers of attacks surged upwards in 2019.

 

There is so much traffic in the straits that pirates can hide in plain sight.

 

Very interesting article on this from Time for anyone interested:

 

https://time.com/piracy-southeast-asia-malacca-strait/

 

John may be able to add his insights on the preparation on board while sailing through.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • Canadian Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...