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Maybe this will be the week for some News


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The answer is yes to all of your questions.

 

Yes, the Healthy Sail Panel will release the info they provided to the CDC.

 

Yes, the CDC will extend the no sail order because there still isn't an approved plan.

 

Yes, RCL will extend the cruise suspension dates.

 

Yes, RCL will release a revised summer 2021 schedule.

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1 minute ago, molly361 said:

Kind of hoping the extension goes through December 6 so I can have closure without waiting another month

 

 If it's from the US , it will probably be cancelled, but I think the cruise lines are still hoping to salvage some holiday sailings.

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4 minutes ago, ipeeinthepool said:

 

 If it's from the US , it will probably be cancelled, but I think the cruise lines are still hoping to salvage some holiday sailings.

Yes it's from PC and it's seven days so I don't think it will sail  I also think that they will try to salvage some holiday sailings

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I am positive my 7-night Harmony from PC on November 8 will be cancelled, but think the Mariner on December 7 and/or Brilliance on December 17 (four nights each) still have a chance.  I keep checking for news, but think the longer we go without an announcement, the better a chance for a positive outcome.  

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3 hours ago, molly361 said:

Healthy Sail Panel Findings?

CDC no Sail Extension?

New Extended cruise Suspension dates?

Leaked Press Release Summer 2021 info?

 

ūüėá

Extension of Lift t and Shift. 

Edited by irishgal432
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I see what RCCL has put out and aside from a few questions on getting tested and then getting the acceptable results to RCCL within 5 days I'm ready..

 

The needed physical changes to the ship seem to be within reason given the rest of September and all of October.

Crew testing and quarantining as well as training with the needed new procedures has adequate time.

Online check-in procedures will need some improvement and enforcement at certain terminals to avoid crowding.

 

CDC has the ball now and could allow cruises as early a November first? 

Caribbean's First Cruises Start on November 7th Aboard SeaDream with a series of cruises departing from Barbados.

 

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35 minutes ago, boscobeans said:

I see what RCCL has put out and aside from a few questions on getting tested and then getting the acceptable results to RCCL within 5 days I'm ready..

 

The needed physical changes to the ship seem to be within reason given the rest of September and all of October.

Crew testing and quarantining as well as training with the needed new procedures has adequate time.

Online check-in procedures will need some improvement and enforcement at certain terminals to avoid crowding.

 

CDC has the ball now and could allow cruises as early a November first? 

Caribbean's First Cruises Start on November 7th Aboard SeaDream with a series of cruises departing from Barbados.

 

 

Barbados has been very friendly to cruise lines

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42 minutes ago, boscobeans said:

I see what RCCL has put out and aside from a few questions on getting tested and then getting the acceptable results to RCCL within 5 days I'm ready..

 

The needed physical changes to the ship seem to be within reason given the rest of September and all of October.

Crew testing and quarantining as well as training with the needed new procedures has adequate time.

Online check-in procedures will need some improvement and enforcement at certain terminals to avoid crowding.

 

CDC has the ball now and could allow cruises as early a November first? 

Caribbean's First Cruises Start on November 7th Aboard SeaDream with a series of cruises departing from Barbados.

 

Albeit, I have not been in clinical practice for quite some time, I have been involved in medical/healthcare quality analytics for over 40 years.  In briefly reviewing the Onboard Medical Capabilities, Clinic Design and Operations, Case Management, Contact Tracing, Isolation/Quarantine , Evacuation, Debarkation Scenarios this will represent a herculean effort on behalf of cruise lines.  Possibly November 1, 2021?

 

Should these recommendations effectively become what the cruise lines and CDC agree on, the level of care that would be required is very equivalent to what we know as an ICU level of care.  Where possibly can we get the amount of physicians and nurses that are trained and are able to provide this level of care to a very large potential number of patients.  

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4 minutes ago, howiefrommd said:

Albeit, I have not been in clinical practice for quite some time, I have been involved in medical/healthcare quality analytics for over 40 years.  In briefly reviewing the Onboard Medical Capabilities, Clinic Design and Operations, Case Management, Contact Tracing, Isolation/Quarantine , Evacuation, Debarkation Scenarios this will represent a herculean effort on behalf of cruise lines.  Possibly November 1, 2021?

 

Should these recommendations effectively become what the cruise lines and CDC agree on, the level of care that would be required is very equivalent to what we know as an ICU level of care.  Where possibly can we get the amount of physicians and nurses that are trained and are able to provide this level of care to a very large potential number of patients.  

 

Easy answer - don't let a certain demographic cruise.

 

1.) over 70

2.) obese

3.) diabetic

4.) other health factors

 

Or require Vax ceritificate and you can hop on board.

 

That rules out majority of folks that would need intensive care (if you study the CDC statistics/reporting)

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Just now, TheMastodon said:

 

Easy answer - don't let a certain demographic cruise.

 

1.) over 70

2.) obese

3.) diabetic

4.) other health factors

 

Or require Vax ceritificate and you can hop on board.

 

That rules out majority of folks that would need intensive care (if you study the CDC statistics/reporting)

Wish it was that easy.  SARS-CoV-2 is really a very unique virus.  When you review the data, those who are up in age and have comorbidities represent most that are dying.  When I speak with my intensivist colleagues,  the problem seems to be the long lasting problems younger people are having.  

 

When I was in training (in the late 70's early 80s, we were getting patients with opportunistic infections.  This ended up being HIV/AIDs.  I had very respected Professors tell us, not too worry there will be a vaccine/immunization.  Heard similar things about Norovirus (since the 60s).  In order the have the level of immunity that will be effective, first, need immunizations that are safe and effective, second, need at least 70 percent of the population to immunized or show immunity.  The interesting thing we are seeing with this unique virus,  is the lack of antibodies consistent to provide immunity .

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20 minutes ago, howiefrommd said:

Albeit, I have not been in clinical practice for quite some time, I have been involved in medical/healthcare quality analytics for over 40 years.  In briefly reviewing the Onboard Medical Capabilities, Clinic Design and Operations, Case Management, Contact Tracing, Isolation/Quarantine , Evacuation, Debarkation Scenarios this will represent a herculean effort on behalf of cruise lines.  Possibly November 1, 2021?

 

Should these recommendations effectively become what the cruise lines and CDC agree on, the level of care that would be required is very equivalent to what we know as an ICU level of care.  Where possibly can we get the amount of physicians and nurses that are trained and are able to provide this level of care to a very large potential number of patients.  

 

Several thousand customers shop at each of our local supermarkets during any single day. 

 

Most wear masks, others don't.

Some use the sanitizer to wipe down their shopping carts, others don't.

Some use the hand sanitizers provided, others don't.

Some pick through all the fruits and vegetables and touch EVEYTHING in the store, others don't.

Some follow the footsteps on the floor and do the ONE-WAY thing, others don't

Some stand on the 6 foot spacing markers when checking out, others don't.. 

 

During the SENIOR hours in the morning the stores here are packed with seniors and I am sure they aren't all free from any of the comorbidities yet they are there in force almost each and every morning...

 

 

There isn't and hasn't been any large or even small scale need for ICU facilities or even hospitalizations in the area?

European lines will be sailing the Caribbean in November and enforcing their rules, which are basically the same as RCCL has presented to the CDC. 

 

Let's just do it... Be careful, follow the procedures and protocols and have a Covid-19 and a NORO free cruise...

 

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13 minutes ago, boscobeans said:

 

Several thousand customers shop at each of our local supermarkets during any single day. 

 

Most wear masks, others don't.

Some use the sanitizer to wipe down their shopping carts, others don't.

Some use the hand sanitizers provided, others don't.

Some pick through all the fruits and vegetables and touch EVEYTHING in the store, others don't.

Some follow the footsteps on the floor and do the ONE-WAY thing, others don't

Some stand on the 6 foot spacing markers when checking out, others don't.. 

 

During the SENIOR hours in the morning the stores here are packed with seniors and I am sure they aren't all free from any of the comorbidities yet they are there in force almost each and every morning...

 

 

There isn't and hasn't been any large or even small scale need for ICU facilities or even hospitalizations in the area?

European lines will be sailing the Caribbean in November and enforcing their rules, which are basically the same as RCCL has presented to the CDC. 

 

Let's just do it... Be careful, follow the procedures and protocols and have a Covid-19 and a NORO free cruise...

 

Everything has risk.  What I was commenting on is now that this report has been published, CDC will have to do their thing with the public comments they received, review the plans that the cruise lines will submit, deal with the politics, etc. Unfortunately his process is not efficient nor speedy.   In my opinion, to think that we will be cruising relatively soon, is beyond optimistic.  

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1 hour ago, howiefrommd said:

Wish it was that easy.  SARS-CoV-2 is really a very unique virus.  When you review the data, those who are up in age and have comorbidities represent most that are dying.  When I speak with my intensivist colleagues,  the problem seems to be the long lasting problems younger people are having.  

 

When I was in training (in the late 70's early 80s, we were getting patients with opportunistic infections.  This ended up being HIV/AIDs.  I had very respected Professors tell us, not too worry there will be a vaccine/immunization.  Heard similar things about Norovirus (since the 60s).  In order the have the level of immunity that will be effective, first, need immunizations that are safe and effective, second, need at least 70 percent of the population to immunized or show immunity.  The interesting thing we are seeing with this unique virus,  is the lack of antibodies consistent to provide immunity .

But, did HIV/AIDS and Norovirus vaccines ever make it to trials?   If so, trials that were going well?   As well as a lot of people don't seem to understand they're not looking for a cure.  They're looking to get the immune response that will greatly reduce the symptoms so it's more like a common cold.

Edited by BND
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2 hours ago, howiefrommd said:

Wish it was that easy.  SARS-CoV-2 is really a very unique virus.  When you review the data, those who are up in age and have comorbidities represent most that are dying.  When I speak with my intensivist colleagues,  the problem seems to be the long lasting problems younger people are having.  

 

When I was in training (in the late 70's early 80s, we were getting patients with opportunistic infections.  This ended up being HIV/AIDs.  I had very respected Professors tell us, not too worry there will be a vaccine/immunization.  Heard similar things about Norovirus (since the 60s).  In order the have the level of immunity that will be effective, first, need immunizations that are safe and effective, second, need at least 70 percent of the population to immunized or show immunity.  The interesting thing we are seeing with this unique virus,  is the lack of antibodies consistent to provide immunity .

In regard to "long lasting problems younger people are having" - how many?  

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