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sail7seas

Niggly little Annoyances.........

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I hate it when people refer to the Zuiderdam as the Zuidi, the Westerdam as the Westy, etc.

 

Worse even, referring to the Zuiderdam simply as "Zui."

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The one who differed pointed out there is one province (county) which is not technically included in Holland but is in The Netherlands.

 

Actually the Netherlands is divided into 12 provinces. Two provinces in the western region are North Holland and South Holland. Amsterdam is the largest city in North Holland and Rotterdam is the largest in South Holland. There is also a suburb of Chicago named South Holland.

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Or referring to Holland America Line as Holland?

Holland is a country.

 

Actually no, Holland is a part of the country call The Netherlands (North Holland and South Holland are provinces). :D

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Learn something new every day. I thought aft meant the back. I rarely hear anyone using stern. Thanks for the info...and I'll try not to say aft anymore:o :D .

At least my TA understands me when I ask for an aft cabin.;)

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Or, Copper, folks who use the word "there" instead of the word "their" in their avatar :D (no offense intended)

 

Some people say 'here here!' instead of 'hear hear!' :D

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My greatest pet peeve aboard ship would have to be people who speak rudely and/or dismissively to the Indonesian crew, and to the beverage staff. Honestly!:mad:

 

Another would have to be cigarette butts stuck in used coffee cups, and then left on the open decks. Ick and a half. :eek:

 

Since others have mentioned spoken language, I wonder about the declining use of the word "are." So many times speakers use the word "is" with a plural subject. Yikes.:confused:

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My greatest pet peeve aboard ship would have to be people who speak rudely and/or dismissively to the Indonesian crew, and to the beverage staff. Honestly!:mad:
Absolutely! This chaps me to no end. There's no excuse for it.

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People who use Maitre 'd or Maitre'd instead of Maitre d' ... because it's short for Maitre d'hotel!

 

Gangplank......

Though there are times a gangplank (instead of a gangway) might come in handy. :D

Actually, gangplank is a perfectly good synonym for gangway. Merriam-Webster says:

 

gang·plank

Pronunciation: \ˈgaŋ-ˌplaŋk\

Function: noun

Date: 1846

 

: a movable bridge used in boarding or leaving a ship at a pier

 

 

I overheard a discussion re "aft cabins", when they obviously meant "stern cabins".

 

Rarely do I see posts re cabins at the stern, but often about aft cabins, which may be anything to the rear of your relative position. Aft is a direction, not a location.

Hear, Hear! That's a pet peeve of mine too! I was even criticized once for referring to cabins at the "aft bends" (as opposed to the forward ones) because they weren't on the stern!! :eek:

 

 

As one CD said, "You can put a boat on a ship but you can't put a ship on a boat." :)
But you can put a boat on a boat if the larger one is a submarine or a small-ish yacht. :D

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Those people in the buffet line that have to take one of everything,and then ask the server "What's That" regarding every item.

 

Those at the buffet who can't put salad dressing on, without dribbling it all over everything.

 

cluelesslady1.jpg

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My greatest pet peeve aboard ship would have to be people who speak rudely and/or dismissively to the Indonesian crew, and to the beverage staff. Honestly!:mad:

 

.

 

Agree!!

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Those people in the buffet line that have to take one of everything,and then ask the server "What's That" regarding every item.

 

Those at the buffet who can't put salad dressing on, without dribbling it all over everything.

 

 

Oh Oh -- we have surely seen many of them in line!!

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People who say "I could care less" when they really mean "I couldn't care less".

I really hate that! I had a disagreement with a guy at work about this. I told him it's I couldn't care less.....but he wouldn't agree with me. I finally found something on the internet to support my position. Beats working any day however:D .

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Oh, thank you, KK. I've always cringed when I read these abbreviated ship names. I'm so glad I'm not the only one who cringes!!!!

 

What would that make the Rotterdam? The Rotty?

 

Rick

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In Nautical terms: Aft simply refers to the space toward or close to the Stern..One can have an Aft cabin which is not in the Stern..

I agree with JTL ... In Nautical terms: A Gangplank is a board or ramp used as a removable footway between a ship and a pier. Also called gangway..

A Gangway is a passageway along either side of a ship's upper deck. See gangplank. An opening in the bulwark of a ship through which passengers may board. 2. A narrow passageway, as of boards laid on the ground. 3. The main level of a mine. 4. Chiefly British. The aisle that divides the front and rear seating sections of the House of Commons. An aisle between seating sections, as in a theater.

According to Dictionary.Com..." Gangplank is a noun

a flat plank or small, movable, bridge like structure for use by persons boarding or leaving a ship at a pier.

Also called brow, gangway.

[Origin: 1840–50, Americanism; gang1 + plankthinsp.png]

Therefore I believe that Gangplank & Gangway are inter-changable... Also believe when we embark & disembark our ship in Ft. Lauderdale we use a Gangway..However in Port the ship uses a Gangplank from the ship to the dock...

Like cruzincurt & Lorekauf I also grind my teeth when I hear someone saying "I could care Less" instead of "I couldn't care less."

But having an English teacher in my immediate family never broke me of the habit of saying "Gist a minute" instead of "Just a minute." That drove my Dearest Mom & Aunt crazy..;)

JMO...:) Betty

 

 

 

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People who don't know the difference between then and than. Or like I said instead of the proper as I said.

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What would that make the Rotterdam? The Rotty?

 

Rick

 

 

lolol .... now my mind is spinning: The Prinsey, The Statey, The Veeny ... sound like names from "Happy Days" .... lolol ...

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How about "mute" point instead of moot point?

 

Or taking a different "tact" rather than "tack"?

 

On this board, however, the "dinning" abuse is very high. Of course, no one on this thread is guilty ;)

 

My favorite word use situation came up when I was employed by a British company. We had all agreed in a meeting to "table" an issue. Well, the one guy from the UK kept talking about it! Drove us all nuts until someone asked why, and it turns out that in the UK, "tabling" an issue means that you have put it on the table to talk about further, not to delay for a later date:rolleyes:

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One of my pet peeves is the incorrect use of "Begs the question" to mean "Raises the question". "Begging the question" is a term used in the field of logic to describe a form of circular reasoning; it has very limited relevance in general conversation.

I have noticed the misuse of this term to be on the upswing, having heard it recently from numerous journalists, politicians, and talk show hosts.

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In Nautical terms: Aft simply refers to the space toward or close to the Stern..One can have an Aft cabin which is not in the Stern..

 

I agree with JTL ... In Nautical terms: A Gangplank is a board or ramp used as a removable footway between a ship and a pier. Also called gangway..

 

A Gangway is a passageway along either side of a ship's upper deck. See gangplank. An opening in the bulwark of a ship through which passengers may board. 2. A narrow passageway, as of boards laid on the ground. 3. The main level of a mine. 4. Chiefly British. The aisle that divides the front and rear seating sections of the House of Commons. An aisle between seating sections, as in a theater.

 

According to Dictionary.Com..." Gangplank is a noun

a flat plank or small, movable, bridge like structure for use by persons boarding or leaving a ship at a pier.

Also called brow, gangway.

 

[Origin: 1840–50, Americanism; gang1 + plankthinsp.png]

 

Therefore I believe that Gangplank & Gangway are inter-changable... Also believe when we embark & disembark our ship in Ft. Lauderdale we use a Gangway..However in Port the ship uses a Gangplank from the ship to the dock...

 

Like cruzincurt & Lorekauf I also grind my teeth when I hear someone saying "I could care Less" instead of "I couldn't care less."

 

But having an English teacher in my immediate family never broke me of the habit of saying "Gist a minute" instead of "Just a minute." That drove my Dearest Mom & Aunt crazy..;)

 

JMO...:) Betty

 

 

 

 

 

So, just to clear this up for me. If HAL calls my cabin a veranda aft, (VA) and it was really at the stern, do I say I have a stern cabin or an aft cabin? I guess I had an aft stern veranda cabin that I loved.

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The official name of the country is the Kingdom of the Netherlands (Koninkrijk der Nederlanden in Dutch) which has twelve provinces; those twelve are (in alphabetical order):

 

Drenthe

Flevoland (the newest one)

Friesland

Gelderland

Groningen

Limburg

Noord (North) Brabant

Noord (North) Holland

Overijssel

Utrecht

Zeeland

Zuid (South) Holland

 

Now, even though officially it's incorrect to call the Kingdom of the Netherlands "Holland", a lot of the Dutchies themselves do it, especially in athletic events. You will hear them yelling "Holland, Holland" in cheering on the "voetbal" (football/soccer) team of the Netherlands and not "Nederland, Nederland" (Dutch for the Netherlands) so it's really not that black & white but it's similar to using "England" for "the United Kingdom" (Don't tell a Scot he lives in England), and "America" for "the United States of America"

 

 

Here's some background:

 

Holland used to be an independent country. It had a "Count", its own coinage (until the 19th century), its own measuring units and time - but it gave up that independence in the 16th century, when it allied with the Northern and Southern Netherlands against the armies of the King of Spain whom at the time was officially the "Count of Holland" and ruled over this whole area. The main reasons for war were religious differences, disputes over taxes and the fact that when some cities wanted to break free, the King's army was quite brutal to civilians.

dotclear.gif

 

Eventually the Southern Netherlands gave up the fight and stayed occupied by foreign forces until 1830. That area is now called Belgium. The Northern Netherlands fought on and won. Then, along with the counties of (Holland, Drente, Groningen, Friesland, Gelderland, Zeeland and Utrecht) became a free Republic, including the occupied regions of Brabant and Limburg. All these counties (called provinces today, together with some new ones) are now called "The Kingdom of the Netherlands."

dotclear.gif

 

Today the province of Limburg still has a Governor and to say to someone from Limburg or Friesland that he or she is from Holland, is considered an insult. They are not! They consider themselves to be from the Netherlands. They even have their own language.

dotclear.gif

People from other Provinces (except North and South Holland) will perhaps not consider it a real insult, but still they're not from Holland.

dotclear.gif

 

Now, if you really want to muddy the waters, why are citizens of the Kingdom of the Netherlands called "Dutch?"

 

"Dutch" is actually older than "the Netherlands". Until the sixteenth century, inhabitants of the Netherlands called themselves Diets (which means "the people"). This word, pronounced "deets", was corrupted in English as "Dutch". The British continued to use the medieval name long after Netherlanders stopped using it themselves.

 

Americans tend to use the word "Dutch" not only to describe Netherlands, but also Germans. Thus, while the Holland Dutch from Michigan are true descendants of Netherlands, the Pennsylvania Dutch are actually German. (The "Dutch" in Pennsylvania Dutch almost certainly stems from the corruption of the German name for their country, Deutschland.) "To stop this confusing multiplicity of names the Netherlands Government has tried to use the words "The Netherlands' as the name for the country and "Netherlander" as the name for an inhabitant of the Netherlands. It is easy to decree such a thing, but it takes much time to suppress a time-honored word used in foreign countries".

 

Netherlanders have to deal with confusion not only about the name of their country, but about the name of their capital. Amsterdam is the official capital, but the seat of government is The Hague. The official name of The Hague is 's-Gravenhage, "the count's hedge", except nobody calls the city 's-Gravenhage, preferring Den Haag (the hedge) instead.

 

Still confused? How 'bout "cloggies?" or a "Kaaskop?"

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