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P&O Cruisers - What are things like where YOU are?


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12 hours ago, wowzz said:

Total rip off  - you pay extra for the legs that aren't there!

Hardly a total rip off, wowzz. Tesco small frozen turkey £14, turkey crown roughly the same size £20, but with hardly any waste, cooks faster, easier to carve, takes up less oven space, and fits better in a normal roasting tin. As most of us only buy turkey once a year, this makes a difference in cost of 0.016p per day (a little less in leap years), or 11.5p per week.

 

And before anyone asks, I'm stuck in waiting for a delivery and have nothing better to do.😂

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3 hours ago, Angel57 said:

Oh goodness.... I had a mental image of you doing that and nearly spat my tea out. I’ve obviously got a warped sense of humour.......🤣

Any sense of humour is a good sense of humour, it's the only way to get by😄 Well that and a very thick skin😉

Avril

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12 hours ago, wowzz said:

Death rate per 100,000 children under 5 in 1940 was 75.84. Today it is 0.4.

https://www.statista.com/statistics/1041714/united-kingdom-all-time-child-mortality-rate/

Sorry, the facts don't support your rose tinted view of the past.

The other thing about healthy diet in those days is that most people worked off the calories they consumed, how many do that today aust sat in front of computers for the most of the working day and youngsters were out playing in the fresh air.

Edited by Bloodaxe
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6 minutes ago, Bloodaxe said:

The other thing about healthy diet in those days is that most people worked off the calories they consumed, how many do that today just sat in front of computers for the most of the working day

Like the Hovis advert,riding that bike up that bloody great hill.It'd be on a bus route now.

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7 minutes ago, Bloodaxe said:

The other thing about healthy diet in those days is that most people worked off the calories they consumed, how many do that today just sat in front of computers for the most of the working day

That’s true enough but .... it didn’t help the miners who contracted pneumoconiosis or builders who suffered from asbestos poisoning. We all tend to look back at the ‘good old days’ but many things are much better these days.

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37 minutes ago, Eglesbrech said:

My mum used to use the syrup from the fruit to mix in with jelly. I had forgotten all about that so thanks for  bringing back a nice childhood memory.

Another memory for me,Mum and Dad only bought the fruit in syrup.When I got married my OH educated me to the fruit in juice,I would never go back to the sickly goo,lol.

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A crown in this house too, so much easier to deal with, and more than enough for two a couple of meals.  Never too keen on the legs, either carving or eating.

 

To get back to tinned fruit, it is now in either 'light' syrup, or juice, either of the fruit or grape.  Obviously meant to be healthier than the very sweet syrup of the old days.

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2 minutes ago, brian1 said:

Another memory for me,Mum and Dad only bought the fruit in syrup.When I got married my OH educated me to the fruit in juice,I would never go back to the sickly goo,lol.

Yes I have bought only fresh or canned in fruit juice since being in charge of my own kitchen but my mum bought the syrupy stuff all her life. 
 

Generational trends I suppose.

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2 hours ago, brian1 said:

The both of us were not war babies sis.My Dad lived on lard all his life and I unwittingly was raised on it till  I got married.He lived to 92,so perhaps it wasn't that bad.He would never buy tinned pineapple,cos in the war it was just flavoured turnips and still thought it was now.Cheers,bro.

Dad always told me that rasberry jam was flavoured apple with wood chips in it. I didn't believe him, but now you've made me think😁 He told me a lot about the war years as he was a mechanical engineer on huge earth moving vehicles that constucted  and repaired runways in and around London. He never thought he did enough during the war because he didn't serve, and so he also helped out after air raids searching for and rescuing any survivours. There were some harrowing stories, and dad suffered from occasional nightmares for the rest of his life. It triggered my interest in the home war effort and it's an interest of mine, researching war on the home front. Sorry about that blather bro, I seem to have gone off on one. Again😊

Sis

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2 hours ago, lincslady said:

I didn't know about the tinned pineapple which was turnip!  We do have for breakfast some tined fruit in juice, to which I add banana and grapes or satsumas, plus yogurt for me.  I think tinned pineapple chunks, especially Dole when you can get them, are the very nicest tinned fruit, and pretty well comparable to fresh.  I don't feel like dealing with a fresh  pineapple at 7.30 a.m.!  Do any of you approve of tinned fruit?  I know some people, including my daughter, think it is the lowest of the low.

I always have several  tins of various fruits in the pantry and replace them as they're used, only the ones in natural fruit juice though, never in syrup. A really handy standby to keep in.

Avril

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33 minutes ago, Bloodaxe said:

The other thing about healthy diet in those days is that most people worked off the calories they consumed, how many do that today aust sat in front of computers for the most of the working day and youngsters were out playing in the fresh air.

Thanks for that Bloodaxe. I was posting about the healthy diet too, but it was taken over by mortality rates. It's refreshing when someone actually reads a post. 

Avril

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29 minutes ago, Ardennais said:

That’s true enough but .... it didn’t help the miners who contracted pneumoconiosis or builders who suffered from asbestos poisoning. We all tend to look back at the ‘good old days’ but many things are much better these days.

I would be darned annoyed if that wasn't the case, but there were things which were better then, just as well as the benefits that far better health care and improved knowledge of work hazards have brought.

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51 minutes ago, Adawn47 said:

Any sense of humour is a good sense of humour, it's the only way to get by😄 Well that and a very thick skin😉

Avril

Also a good pair of rosy glasses helps as some say :classic_unsure::classic_biggrin::classic_biggrin:

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6 minutes ago, kalos said:

Also a good pair of rosy glasses helps as some say :classic_unsure::classic_biggrin::classic_biggrin:

Don't you start kalos😁 I've enough thinking I'm an silly woman who doesn't know what she's talking about, and lives in cloud cuckoo land as it is🤣🤣😉

Avril

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2 hours ago, Adawn47 said:

I suppose it all depends on what you read, and how you personally interpret it. I enjoy an intelligent disccusion wowzz, which I thought this was going to be, but for some reason you seem to be extra testy, along with a few others, recently and your sniping at the end or your replies aren't imho necessary. Maybe it wasn't mean't how I read it,  and if so I apologise, but it's pointless entering into a discussion where I feel my views are totally dismissed as baseless because they don't agree with yours, and that I'm 'looking through rose-tinted glasses' 

Avril

 

I agree with you Avril.

I usually read and respond to nearly every post but some posts do not deserve reading never mind responding to.

Graham.

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1 hour ago, AnnieC said:

Hardly a total rip off, wowzz. Tesco small frozen turkey £14, turkey crown roughly the same size £20, but with hardly any waste, cooks faster, easier to carve, takes up less oven space, and fits better in a normal roasting tin. As most of us only buy turkey once a year, this makes a difference in cost of 0.016p per day (a little less in leap years), or 11.5p per week.

 

And before anyone asks, I'm stuck in waiting for a delivery and have nothing better to do.😂

Our Wagu beef cost more than your turkey crown - sorry, that came across a little wrong ! I mean that price is not the reason we don't buy turkey.  

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7 minutes ago, wowzz said:

Our Wagu beef cost more than your turkey crown - sorry, that came across a little wrong ! I mean that price is not the reason we don't buy turkey.  

I'm not having turkey this year - we held a vote and the gammon joint won. It is legless.🙂

Edited by AnnieC
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Rib of beef for us, roasted rare, with YPs, roasters, parsnips and sprouts

 

I’ve never rated turkey breast, though I enjoy the thigh meat.  It tastes like roast lamb to me.  Out of the festive season a thigh weighing about 3lbs costs £3.35 and (over)feeds the two of us, twice.  Roast, then a curry or stir-fry.  Tesco everyday bargain

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2 hours ago, Eglesbrech said:

I read an interesting article about Christmas traditions and while most of us now eat Turkey if we were Victorians it would have been goose, if Elizabethans beef, haunches of venison and lots of March-pane.

 

We have a turkey for Christmas Day but we will be having a Brexit Christmas dinner this year, same as a normal one but with no Brussels.
 

Actually seriously I can’t get hold of Brussels sprouts so far, not even frozen ones. My husband is delighted as he can’t stand them but I have pointed out that they are on order for next week again so he is not getting off that lightly! Given that everything else I ordered came I’m beginning to wonder if he has bribed the delivery driver to ditch the sprouts.
 

I also have venison on order for the Christmas week so going slightly Elizabethan. Nothing beats a venison stew on a cold day.


We usually get a large turkey and freeze what is left to make curries or chowder in the new year. 
 

Getting hungry talking about all this food.

I have been to Tesco earlier and there were loads of sprouts, loose pick your own, bags of prepared ones, bags of not prepared ones and the sticks of sprouts.

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I think some people find roast turkey quite dry, but prepared well to keep all the juices in, it can be delicious. I cover mine in lots of streaky bacon, and cook it in a pan of oranges and onion with a good slug or two of cider.

My favourite part of Christmas dinner is sausage-meat stuffing wrapped in bacon and bread sauce.

I'm not used to cooking Christmas dinner for only 6 of us so I'm sure we'll be eating left overs for ages.

Edited by SarahHben
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